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Thread: Beefy Wheelset?

  1. #1
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    Beefy Wheelset?

    I'm looking for a winning combination of hubs, spokes, and rims for a rider who's hovering over 200. Currently I'm considering building up on a set of dt swiss rims with industry nine classic hubs. I'm open for suggestions/criticisms. These are going on a hard-tail and my local trails don't really send me in the air more than about two feet to flat.

  2. #2
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    Start with Salsa Gordo Rims if you want something beefy with a nice solid footprint.
    I am 6'4" 240, and I love them.

    Add some double butted spokes, high flange hubs, and they will be unstoppable.


    M

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    Believe it or not.... But I've been running a set of Mavic Crossmax's for a yr and I absolutely love them. I bought them used with some miles already on them (I was a little worried to say the least). I've had Zero problems with them. in fact I only had to true them 1 time and thats because I completely blasted a tree. I race motocross, so I'm not exactly easy on them either...

    BTW, I'm 6'3" and 235.
    "Drive Drunk...Drive Fast!!!"

  4. #4
    slow uphill
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    +1 for the Gordos. Riding weight is 260-270lbs and these things are bombproof. I've ridden them flat a couple of times.

  5. #5
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    I am not quite clear on what you are seeking with a 'winning combination'. For me, that is a very durable wheelset (especially the freehub) that isn't terribly portly given my size and history of freehub issues. 'Bling' factor is relatively immaterial to me. I want decent performance, reasonable weight and superb relaibility. YMMV.

    I have a similar riding style to that of the OP, and I am about 260lbs currently and have been loving the DT 240s/Stans Flow wheels I am riding (tubeless) right now on my 29er HT.

  6. #6
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    +1 for Gordos. And personally, I would steer clear of the I-9's. Have heard/read good, but just as much bad. And with clydes, replacing spokes at, what, $5 a shot doesn't seem like such a hot idea. I would go with a 36h using some kind of "standard" spoke. I just got a set of 36h Hadley/Gordos and don't expect to have to worry about wheels until I'm under 200...which will be far off in the distance...
    What I do for a living doesn't define me....

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    With regards to spokes, I had a question. Assuming the material is the same, wouldn't a 14 straight-gauge be stronger than a single or double butted 14/15 gauge? Also, will most rims/hubs not accept anything larger than the standard 14 gauge? I notice Phil Wood makes a 13/14 gauge single butted spoke, but if you were to go this route, would the hub options severely limited (tandem hubs only)?

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    I ride the 36 hole phil wood tandem hub,14gauge spokes and ryno lite dh rims. heavy and clunky too sum but I like going for a ride and knowing that me and the bike will come home in one pieace. the wheels are on a old ibis alibi frame with race face diablous cranks.

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Peccary
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    I've been beating on a set of 29er flows with a hope front/hadley rear for a while now without issue.. I'm running somewhere around 210-215 when I'm riding.. although with being laid up now, I suspect I'll be closer to the 225 range again when I get to ride again.
    mike

  10. #10
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    Rims-Stans Flows...200#'s is nothing and they give you a tubeless option
    Premium Hubs-King with stainless steel FH Body or Hadley
    Spokes-DT Swiss Comps or (my preference) Wheelsmith DB14

  11. #11
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    Any current deals for a wheelset that would accomodate a 225 lb rider for all mountain use? Or do you recommend having a set of wheels built up? The wheels will go on a chainlove XL Santa Cruz Blur LT2.

  12. #12
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    Your weight isn't that much, your power might be.
    Only you know if you are a strong rider.

    Most rims designed for AM/DH will be plenty strong.
    Double butted spokes are stronger than single butted due to the way they are drawn. Some wheel builders disagree with this obvious fact, but it says it in black and white on the DT Swiss/ Sapim website.
    One of the theories is that they stretch a bit more before snapping, all I know is that I have never snapped a DB spoke, and generally destroy equipment.

    Hub could be a tough one, if you produce a lot of torque you can shatter the engagement system (I do this more often than you would believe). Hope makes excellent hubs, as does hadely (CK is the best for a powerful rider, but so so pricey). If you want the silly high engagement look at the offerings from superstar.co.uk. Probably come out of the same taiwan factory as I9, just half the price.

    I would stress that if you want to up your level on riding you really want solid axles eg 20mm front and 12mm back. They stiffen up steering a lot for a heavy rider.

    It is also worth building your own wheels as this gives you the knowledge you need to keep them true. It is very very easy, watch a few vids on youtube. You do not need a wheel building jog, I have one but do not do it, just mount in frame and do it there.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  13. #13
    Control Freak
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    I was running the 317's that came with my bike...I ripped the rear hub housing from the shimona rear hub...needless to say its taken a while to get the warranty items from Shimano and fixed...so I bought a set of crossmax ST. I had these on my older bike and couldnt beat them up...230lbs with gear is what I weigh and I dont take it easy on my bike. They have held up well.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaveGiant
    Probably come out of the same taiwan factory as I9
    Really, and here I thought I9 was machined in Asheville, NC.

    From the About page at I9:

    What separates Industry Nine wheels from the competition?

    First and foremost our wheels are 100% made in our Asheville, NC facility. We outsource rims and bearings…that’s it. Design, manufacturing, quality control, sales, assembly, truing and tensioning are all done in house where we can keep close tabs on tolerances and quality. In a time where the bike industry is constantly moving production overseas to increase margins, we firmly believe in keeping our production in house.

  15. #15
    OSM
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    I would not suggest Syncros DS28 rims as i taco'd mine bad. You will want a hand built wheelset no matter what because that is what ensures a strong build. I run mavic ex 721 with 14g straight spokes 32 cross on a sealed high flange hubs. i race Dh and jump these wheels regularly and have not even trued them in a whole year. 225lbs and charging the hardtail through the rock gardens.
    Bicycles D'opinion/ COMMENCAL /Principat D'Andorra

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaddSquirrel
    Really, and here I thought I9 was machined in Asheville, NC.

    From the About page at I9:

    What separates Industry Nine wheels from the competition?

    First and foremost our wheels are 100% made in our Asheville, NC facility. We outsource rims and bearings…that’s it. Design, manufacturing, quality control, sales, assembly, truing and tensioning are all done in house where we can keep close tabs on tolerances and quality. In a time where the bike industry is constantly moving production overseas to increase margins, we firmly believe in keeping our production in house.
    Guess you are right =-)
    The superstar hub is very good though.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

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