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  1. #1
    Don't skid
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    Any clydes ride steel frames

    I bought a On-One Inbread sliding dropout frame a few months back. The idea was to build a SS and try it out and if I didn't like SS I could convert it the a geared XC hardtail (that's the advantage of the sliding droputs). Well long story short, I didn't like the SS so tonight I just finished put a SRAM X.9 drivetrain on it.
    Now I have two problems.

    1) I am running Avid BB7 mech. disc brakes. When I use the brake at medium stopping power (or stronger) both the front and rear wheel will shift in their dropouts. I have QR both front and rear. I have owed two other bikes with QR and disc (mech and hydo) and have not experieced this problem. And before you say it, I am sure the QR's are tight enough. Has anoyone else had this problem? I am thinking that converting to bolt on axles will solve this. Any thoughts?

    2) This is the biggest prolem I am having. The new X.9 rear derailer so far seems great (limited ride timer) BUT when I mash on the pedals, way less than race intensity, I get ghost shifting. I have had this happen on an old bike, it turned out the gears where old and the chain was stretched and worn out. I don't think that's the case here since I have a new chain but the cassette is one I swapped off one of my other bikes that did not have this problem. What I think is causing the problem is frame flex. The Inbread is my first steel frame and the very first thing I noticed when I rode it was the flexy frame, especially lateral flex at the BB. So I will of course try to eliminate every other possibility but I am wondering if steel is just not for Clydesdales. Any thoughts on this? I really liked this frame and don't want to sell it but I can't have a bike that throws a chain every time I stand up on the pedals.

    Thanks in advance,
    Wil.
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

  2. #2
    Papa T
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    If your rear wheel is shifting from the braking action, it will throw your rear cassette out of square. Check to see if your cassette wobbles back in forth when the rear wheel is rotating.

    I had a similar problem, but it wasn't because of wheel movement in the dropout, just a badly built up rear wheel. I had just enough wobble in my cassette to cause ghost shifting under heavy pedaling. I tried everything to fix it, but could never get rid of it until I got a new wheelset, problem solved. =) This was on my GF surgar 3+. The frame flexes alot laterally on me so I thought for sure that was the problem. Turned out to be the cassette wobble.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Stray Bullet
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    What kind of rear hub are you running?

  4. #4
    Can Tree Member
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    Let me try a few ideas here...

    Regarding your ghost shifting...are you getting "skipping" under load, where it feels like the bike is trying to shift but not quite making it? Or are you getting a complete shift into a different gear? If you are experiencing the former, your problem is most likely the used cassette (unless you are telling us that you put a new chain on the old cassette on the old bike and it ran fine there). If you are getting true "ghost shifting" I'd work over the entire drivetrain carefully before deciding that a flexy steel frame is the problem...and if that turns out to be the issue, it's not because steel is the wrong material...it's because that frame was built too light for you. But I'd look at a lot of other stuff before concluding that.

    Regarding the wheels being pulled from the dropouts under "moderate" braking...something is definitely wrong there. Maybe more clamping pressure with a bolt-on axle will solve the problem but I would not want to really have to wail on them because that has some impact on the bearing pre-load...it would be better to get it right with proper clamping pressure (QR or bolts). You didn't mention what type of QR you are using and what the frame finish is on the dropouts. I have a set of XT plasticy dropouts that worked great in my aluminum powder-coated frame, but I have no idea how well they would hold on a chrome dropout with disc brakes. Maybe try a good set of aftermarket QR's like Salsa's. They have a machined serration on the clamping surface that should bite pretty well into the steel faces of the dropouts.
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  5. #5
    TheWebGuy
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    Ahhh, I'm a steel loving clyde. My steel monocog has never given my 250 lbs any trouble at all. Read wheel is bolted on, not QR.
    Just ride the bike.

  6. #6
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    265# on custom steel Gunnar Rockhound. I like steel for clydes on theory that flexing is better than snapping.

    My lbs put a washer on the dropout (QR) after rear wheel kept scooting out under medium pedaling. That seems to have fixed the problem. Maybe it will work for you.
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  7. #7
    Don't skid
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    Thanks for the responses guys. I may have been a little quick to jump to conclusions last night about the cause of my problems, I have been so anxiuos to get this thing ridable that I was really bummed to have these problems. Its good to hear that others are riding steel. The frame feels really nice in the rough stuff so I would like to keep it.

    Dad man Walking I think might be on to something. Today I got a chance to ride it to school and experience the problem more thoroughly. First off, you're correct in that it is not in fact ghost shifting but rather skipping, like its trying to shift. And in addition it turns out it seems to only do this in the middle of my cassette, where I spent most of my time on the old bike. So indeed a worn cassette might be the culprit. I have a new one at home I can throw on this weekend and see if that helps. I really hope that is all it is.
    For whoever asked it's an XT rear hub.

    Now as for the QR and wheel shift, I urked the QR levers really tight and didn't have the problem on the short, flat road ride today but on the trail may be a different story. The weather is sh!tty this weekend and I probably won't get a chance to trail ride it until the middle of next week. The skewers are an XT in the rear and one from an Azonic Outlaw wheelset up front. If the problem persists I may just look into some higher quality skewers. I do like Salsa's stuff .
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

  8. #8
    Stray Bullet
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    Quote Originally Posted by KONA_in_SB
    Thanks for the responses guys. I may have been a little quick to jump to conclusions last night about the cause of my problems, I have been so anxiuos to get this thing ridable that I was really bummed to have these problems. Its good to hear that others are riding steel. The frame feels really nice in the rough stuff so I would like to keep it.

    Dad man Walking I think might be on to something. Today I got a chance to ride it to school and experience the problem more thoroughly. First off, you're correct in that it is not in fact ghost shifting but rather skipping, like its trying to shift. And in addition it turns out it seems to only do this in the middle of my cassette, where I spent most of my time on the old bike. So indeed a worn cassette might be the culprit. I have a new one at home I can throw on this weekend and see if that helps. I really hope that is all it is.
    For whoever asked it's an XT rear hub.

    Now as for the QR and wheel shift, I urked the QR levers really tight and didn't have the problem on the short, flat road ride today but on the trail may be a different story. The weather is sh!tty this weekend and I probably won't get a chance to trail ride it until the middle of next week. The skewers are an XT in the rear and one from an Azonic Outlaw wheelset up front. If the problem persists I may just look into some higher quality skewers. I do like Salsa's stuff .
    Ditch the QR for this http://www.unrealcycles.com/item.php?view=141. It will stiffen the rear of the bike up a lot!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    Could be sub-optimal, but a Surly Tugg Nut should stop the slippage.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by KONA_in_SB
    I bought a On-One Inbread sliding dropout frame a few months back. The idea was to build a SS and try it out and if I didn't like SS I could convert it the a geared XC hardtail (that's the advantage of the sliding droputs). Well long story short, I didn't like the SS so tonight I just finished put a SRAM X.9 drivetrain on it.
    Now I have two problems.

    1) I am running Avid BB7 mech. disc brakes. When I use the brake at medium stopping power (or stronger) both the front and rear wheel will shift in their dropouts. I have QR both front and rear. I have owed two other bikes with QR and disc (mech and hydo) and have not experieced this problem. And before you say it, I am sure the QR's are tight enough. Has anoyone else had this problem? I am thinking that converting to bolt on axles will solve this. Any thoughts?

    2) This is the biggest prolem I am having. The new X.9 rear derailer so far seems great (limited ride timer) BUT when I mash on the pedals, way less than race intensity, I get ghost shifting. I have had this happen on an old bike, it turned out the gears where old and the chain was stretched and worn out. I don't think that's the case here since I have a new chain but the cassette is one I swapped off one of my other bikes that did not have this problem. What I think is causing the problem is frame flex. The Inbread is my first steel frame and the very first thing I noticed when I rode it was the flexy frame, especially lateral flex at the BB. So I will of course try to eliminate every other possibility but I am wondering if steel is just not for Clydesdales. Any thoughts on this? I really liked this frame and don't want to sell it but I can't have a bike that throws a chain every time I stand up on the pedals.

    Thanks in advance,
    Wil.
    I cannot see why the Front wheel will move??? that is very strange.

  11. #11
    Don't skid
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    Quote Originally Posted by wickerman1
    I cannot see why the Front wheel will move??? that is very strange.
    I believe it is quite common among QR and disc brake combos. In fact if you go to the On-One web site they give a sales pitch about how their dropouts in their rigid forks are designed to counter balance the forces of a disc brakes on a QR dropout.
    Point is QR's are not desgined to handle the forces a disc brake can generate. Not to say that they will fail every time but they can slip.
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

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