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  1. #1
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    Any clydes with a CTD fork? Question for you...

    I am 240lbs geared up and I'm running 100psi with rebound 2 clicks away from fastest in my 2013 Fox Float 32 EVO w/CTD.

    I simply can't use the descend mode... it's so squirrely and I've even come close to crashing a few times because the bike behaved so strangely. The Trek website offers suspension settings at my weight so I can't imagine I'm too big for it.

    Also--I set the bike up with 20% sag and I'm only getting 50-60% travel out of the fork. This could just be how I ride (mostly XC) but if I use any less air in the air chamber the bike bobs like crazy up hills (unless I put it in climb mode but sometimes don't have time).

    The bike performs how I want it to but I'm just wondering if I could like it even more with additional tweaking.

  2. #2
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    I have a Float 34 F29 that I purchased from http://www.mtbsuspensionexperts.com/

    The did a custom valve job on it to suit my 340lbs. I run 105psi and have full travel. I also leave the fork on descend all the time for a sweet smooth ride with minimal bob.
    Im sure they can get you set up right.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by desmo944 View Post
    I have a Float 34 F29 that I purchased from http://www.mtbsuspensionexperts.com/

    The did a custom valve job on it to suit my 340lbs. I run 105psi and have full travel. I also leave the fork on descend all the time for a sweet smooth ride with minimal bob.
    Im sure they can get you set up right.
    No bob even when standing up to mash up a hill? Mine only bobs in that situation in "trail" mode... standing/mashing up a hill in climb mode, or climbing while seated in "trail" are fine. I think I'll just set a 25% sag instead of 20% and go from there.

    Anyone have tips for getting to exact pressure you want? If I pump up the shock, disconnect it, reconnect it, I'm always 5-10psi less than where I left it. So I'll usually pump to 105 for the fork and 250 for the shock but especially with the shock I won't know how much I lost disconnecting the pump unless I reconnect it again.

  4. #4
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    I'm over 250lbs before gearing up and ride a 2013 Stache 8 frame with a 120mm F29 Evo CTD. I run about 90psi (IIRC) which puts me at about 30% sag and I prefer that to less sag. I am also only a couple clicks from full fast on the rebound setting. I rarely (if ever) run recommended pressures in air forks, always lower.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    I'm over 250lbs before gearing up and ride a 2013 Stache 8 frame with a 120mm F29 Evo CTD. I run about 90psi (IIRC) which puts me at about 30% sag and I prefer that to less sag. I am also only a couple clicks from full fast on the rebound setting. I rarely (if ever) run recommended pressures in air forks, always lower.
    The Trek website says 7 clicks out for the fork. I'm assuming this means clicks out from fully turned in clockwise. This is about halfway in between full fast and full slow (I think I counted about 14 total clicks). This is odd to me because the recommended for the rear is 2 clicks out from full fast.

    How do you properly measure fork stag, stand up on the pedals? How should you be leaning? Because my fork sags about 2% when I sit on the saddle so I'm assuming that can't be right.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    The Trek website says 7 clicks out for the fork. I'm assuming this means clicks out from fully turned in clockwise. This is about halfway in between full fast and full slow (I think I counted about 14 total clicks). This is odd to me because the recommended for the rear is 2 clicks out from full fast.

    How do you properly measure fork stag, stand up on the pedals? How should you be leaning? Because my fork sags about 2% when I sit on the saddle so I'm assuming that can't be right.
    Just sit on the bike in a normal pedaling position, and get off the bike, and see where the o-ring is.

    If you're riding full suspension, you want to the front and back to work together, and rebound at about the same speed. If the back rebounds faster than the front, it will try to buck you over the bars on a jump.

    I like a somewhat fast rebound speed for good small bump compliance. If you descend aggressively, and the speeds are set too slow, the fork (or shock) will 'pack up' after repeated hits. I ride with the CTD on the fork in descend ("D") most all the time. On the rear shock, I usually like the "T" (trail) setting for climbing, and go to "D" (descend) on the way down. If it's a mixed bag of a trail, I can hang in either "T" or "D". I rarely use "C", but YMMV.

    I like 30% sag on this Fox fork because I usually get close to full travel during my average ride (I descend fairly hard on an average ride), and the fork works well for me this way. I would try it at 30%, and then see how much travel you use on an average ride, and then adjust from there so you're using the travel you paid for (or at least 90% of it). Then get your front and rear rebound speeds sync'd so it acts right in the air.

    That's what works for me.

  7. #7
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    Sitting on the bike really only works the rear shock. I have to be standing for the front shock to move.

    Thanks a lot for the other suggestions.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Sitting on the bike really only works the rear shock. I have to be standing for the front shock to move.

    Thanks a lot for the other suggestions.
    It should work for the front too.

    How much air pressure do you have in the front fork's air spring?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    It should work for the front too.

    How much air pressure do you have in the front fork's air spring?
    It moves it a few mm. 100psi. Haven't tried lowering it to see if it goes down while sitting.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    It moves it a few mm. 100psi. Haven't tried lowering it to see if it goes down while sitting.
    I use right around 90psi and I'm closer to 260 before I get dressed. I'd let some air out until the static sag gets to 30% on that fork, and give it a try. See how much of the travel you use.

    Makes me curious about the air pressure in your tires. I see loads of people (that have bikes with way too much pressure in their tires) that tell me their LBS set them up like that.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    I use right around 90psi and I'm closer to 260 before I get dressed. I'd let some air out until the static sag gets to 30% on that fork, and give it a try. See how much of the travel you use.

    Makes me curious about the air pressure in your tires. I see loads of people (that have bikes with way too much pressure in their tires) that tell me their LBS set them up like that.
    How are you supposed to test fork sag? At 100psi and sitting in the saddle, the fork really doesn't even move. If I'm standing on the pedals I'll get about 15% sag at 100psi.

    I'm set up tubeless with 29x2.2 Conti X-King Protection model and I run 30-32psi. Wouldn't too high of pressure force the bike to use MORE travel?

  12. #12
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    Just sit on it in the same position you would pedal down the street in. Carefully climb on, sit in the riding position without bouncing, and then carefully climb off. If you don't have an o-ring on the stanchion, you could put a zip-tie on there as an indicator.

    In my estimation, going by your description, you have quite a bit more air pressure in there than I would recommend.

  13. #13
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    This is probably a stupid question but are you setting up your sag in Descend mode?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaholbro20 View Post
    This is probably a stupid question but are you setting up your sag in Descend mode?
    No, should I be? Always in trail mode for sag

  15. #15
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    Yea you should be setting both sag and rebound in descend mode

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    also not sure how you are setting your rebound, but after you set your sag in descend mode, start the rebound at full open (slow or more damping) and go from there. when you get to high you'll notice the fork top out on rebound and you'll hear a distinct sound, you don't want it to top out. Then you can adjust from there for personal preference.

  17. #17
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    Seems like it would be even worse if I set sag in descend...

    25% sag in D might only be 20% in T

  18. #18
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    Well the way your doing it now isn't really setting "sag".

  19. #19
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    Still won't make it any better. If it takes 240psi to get me to 25% sag now it might take 260psi if I start doing it in descend mode and I'll use even less travel. Real world circumstance is more important than the manufacturer telling me how I should do something when what they're saying will clearly make it worse.

  20. #20
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    Call me crazy for saying to set the sag and rebound as suggested, which apparently you haven't done yet... Plus Standing on the pedals and transferring weight to the front is not how you set sag.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaholbro20 View Post
    Call me crazy for saying to set the sag and rebound as suggested, which apparently you haven't done yet... Plus Standing on the pedals and transferring weight to the front is not how you set sag.
    Call me crazy for skipping a process I already know the end result of. If I'm not using as much travel as I want now, how is adding MORE air pressure going to help?

    I get what you're saying, but it simply won't help. I'll paypal you $100 if you can convincingly describe to me how doing what you are suggesting will do me any good with my goals (using more travel) in mind.

  22. #22
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    Why is it that you think you need MORE pressure???

    "How are you supposed to test fork sag? At 100psi and sitting in the saddle, the fork really doesn't even move. If I'm standing on the pedals I'll get about 15% sag at 100psi."

    "How do you properly measure fork stag, stand up on the pedals? How should you be leaning? Because my fork sags about 2% when I sit on the saddle so I'm assuming that can't be right."

    "Sitting on the bike really only works the rear shock. I have to be standing for the front shock to move."

    "It moves it a few mm. 100psi. Haven't tried lowering it to see if it goes down while sitting."

    And it was already suggested that: "In my estimation, going by your description, you have quite a bit more air pressure in there than I would recommend."

    I'll go double or nothing that if you put the bike in descend, and just sit in the saddle like your supposed to, no standing up, no bouncing that you still won't get enough sag, you have too much pressure.

  23. #23
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    I'm only using 50-60% of travel both front and rear. That's with 20-25% sag in the back and I don't know what amount of sag in the front because I'm getting conflicting answers as to the appropriate method of measuring.

    If I change to D mode in the rear my sag will only increase, meaning I wouldn't be taking any air out and might even have to add to get back to 25%

    My point was that whatever sag I'm at in T is going to be a lower number than in D, so I'm either already there or might have to add.

  24. #24
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    Keep arguing and doing it your way. You came in here asking about your front fork, which you've been told multiple times that your running too much pressure in your front fork, and I'm also going to say that your not running enough damping for that high of pressure.
    I'm running 105 psi, and have to be 2 clicks from full damping as to not top out. And I weigh more. I'm not going to comment again but when you figure it out you can PM me for my paypal address.

  25. #25
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    My point was that I'm already at the suggested sag level (at least in the rear) so if I go into D mode it'll say I have more sag than I should, so at least for my riding style and trails, sag is not a guideline to bet your life on.

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