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  1. #1
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    400lbs BIG newbie needs help on bike

    I went to the bike shop and got on a bike for the first time in 15 years. I tried a Giant and it was ok but didn't know if it can handle me for long rides.

    So my question is who makes the best bike.

    or

    What parts do I need to build a bike that can handle me to help me lose the weight?

  2. #2
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    It will help if you provide your height and how you intend to ride? Bike paths, fire roads, are you looking at going off any drops or jumps? What is your budget?
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  3. #3
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    At your weight, unless just riding on road, you will need quite a sizable budget.

    It is worth the investment, cycling burns off calories.

    I have had to start lifting a lot of weights to stay clyde.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  4. #4
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    Giant makes a good bike at good price points. They usually don't skimp out on parts.

    Specialized makes an excellent bike but you pay for what you get.

    Norco feels the same, but as a Norco rider in my heavy Clyde days, I can tell you that they're bomb proof.

    If you're riding to lose weight, a hybrid bike may work better then mountain for you.

    What kind of riding to you want to do? Where? How long do you see your longest rides?
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  5. #5
    Fat Biker
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    I've been riding for nearly 5 years and when I started i weighed 265 pounds. Over the years I've learned what will hold up to the weight and what won't. My opinion is that wheels and your seat rails are usually the first to go when you're overweight. Wheels take a pounding while your riding so you need to make sure you buy some strong ones. Stronger wheels are usually heavier but I'd much rather have a heavier bike rather than have taco'd wheels. Every bit of your weights ends up pressing on the seat rails so you'll need a saddle with Cro-Moly rails. Cheaper saddles come with steel rails and you will bend them on the first ride. Some people may tell you that you need a strong chain but to be honest most all chains will be strong enough for you. Chains wear out due to people not cleaning and lubricating them. Sand gets inbetween the rollers and the links and causes a sandpaper effect that wears them out and causes them to snap. Get a good chain that is nickel plated to prevent rust and always clean your chain after a hard ride.

    Alot of people will say that a new rider should buy a hardtail over a full suspension and usually I disagree with them but in your case I think a hardtail would be your best option. If you must have a full suspension you'll want one with a coil shock and not an air shock. Have the shop upgrade the coil to accomodate your weight. An air shock might work but you will be running extremely high air pressure and it may blow the seals. As for what bike to buy you have lots of choices. Giant, Haro, Specialized, Trek, Gary Fisher, Marin, etc all make excellent bikes with great warranties. Avoid bikes from Wal-Mart, Target, Dick's, Costco, Academy, or any other big box store (REI is ok) as they sell cheaply made bikes that have no business being on a real mtb trail. I have a friend who rode a Wal-Mart special and he weighs 185. He destroyed that thing in 2 months of moderate riding. It broke in half in the middle of the top tube. Cheap made and not worth 10 cents.

    Most important is to find a bike that fits. If it doesn't fit then it will be uncomfortable to ride and you won't want to ride it. It will be a new work of art hanging off your garage wall. Go to all the local bike shops in town and try out any bike that is in your price range. See what fits and what doesn't. As many here on mtbr will tell you it's it's cheaper to buy a bike with all the components you want already on it rather than upgrade them later.

    If you have any questions please PM me.

    Mike S.

  6. #6
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    I joined this forum just from reading this thread.

    I'm so glad I'm not the odd ball out. I was thinking of picking up a new mountain bike later this year to help me lose weight. At 342lbs though I am having a little trouble finding bikes I feel comfortable with.

    I'm actually quite active these days. I gained a LOT of weight when I went back to college, and am looking for activities to get into to help keep me active now that I'm about done with school. I started back up at my old Taekwondo school last year which has been a good start (when I went back i was 400+).

    Now I'm looking for another non-gym related (I find the gym to be incredibly boring) activity that will help me lose more weight. I used to mountain bike when I was a bit younger so I thought that'd be a good fit because I used to enjoy it quite a bit. I also figure it'll benefit my TKD as a cardiovascular workout.

    I've never even heard of the "Clydesdale" class of bikers, but I'm happy that there seems to be a lot of info out there. I was getting discouraged though because the heaviest I've seen on the different sites I've looked at is about 270lbs which is substantially lighter than I currently am. This thread is encouraging.

  7. #7
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    If you look down through the threads, there was two page thread last week concerning some good bike recommendations for a gentleman that is approximately 400 pounds. Hope you find something you like and don't let your weight dissuade you from riding; there are lots of bikes that will work, you just have to be selective when purchasing.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the info.

    I am 6 feet 1.
    I am looking for a b@mb proof mtb.
    I want to spend good money on good parts that will handle my weight up front.
    I want to ride in urban/parks mountain trails.

    I was looking at Giant and Surly.
    Whats the best way to go about it.

    build it up or buy and upgrade the weak parts?

    a 29er would be sweet

    am liking the Specialized Rockhopper, Kona Big Kahuna, and Kona Hoss.

    on rims am looking on KH 29 with some maxxis

    the seat : Comfort V Comp Saddle
    Last edited by bikedna; 04-11-2011 at 03:52 PM.

  9. #9
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    I am the same height and when i was approx $480 I bought a Giant Faith freeride bike and had to order a spring for the rear and pump the psi in the forks as much as i could ad the bike handled it like a champ. when i got down to about 400lbs I got a Giant Yukon hardtail its an entry level bike and that bike kicked major butt too. So much so that I have upgraded everything (only part that is stock is the frame.) I have gotten down lower in weight but recently have gained again but I was never under 276lbs. I would say most of my riding has been done at about 320lbs and I beat the crap out of my bike. Even though I am a fatty I can ride pretty good and the Giant keeps rolling without a problem. So obviously I am a diehard Giant guy. The bike is fantastic. Good luck and you can do it.

  10. #10
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    If you were a little taller, I have a Kona Hoss Dee-Lux that I am thinking about liquidating(mine is a 22"). Great Clyde bike... Maybe keep an eye on eBay for a used one?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedna
    Thanks for all the info.

    I am 6 feet 1.
    I am looking for a b@mb proof mtb.
    I want to spend good money on good parts that will handle my weight up front.
    I want to ride in urban/parks mountain trails.

    I was looking at Giant and Surly.
    Whats the best way to go about it.

    build it up or buy and upgrade the weak parts?

    a 29er would be sweet

    am liking the Specialized Rockhopper, Kona Big Kahuna, and Kona Hoss.

    on rims am looking on KH 29 with some maxxis

    the seat : Comfort V Comp Saddle
    Credit to you on the research!

    KH makes great rims; I have broken loads of rear hub, but kept putting the same KH rim back on, it was always true. The FR version is actually lighter than the XC due to being a drilled design. Looks cool too.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattp
    If you were a little taller, I have a Kona Hoss Dee-Lux that I am thinking about liquidating(mine is a 22"). Great Clyde bike... Maybe keep an eye on eBay for a used one?
    I do like tall bikes

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaveGiant
    Credit to you on the research!

    KH makes great rims; I have broken loads of rear hub, but kept putting the same KH rim back on, it was always true. The FR version is actually lighter than the XC due to being a drilled design. Looks cool too.
    Thanks

    So what frame does the KH fit on? What inner tube are the best to go with that rim. I looked all over and show nothing about inner tubes. Who makes the strongest thickest tubes? DH tube?

    Also do I go steel or alum?

    I know I got to go fully rigid hard tail.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedna

    I know I got to go fully rigid hard tail.
    Outside of singlespeeds, there aren't many fully-rigid geared mtb's out there. The GT peace 9R multi is one, but I believe it was discontinued after the 2010 models... may be able to find one discounted. The other I know of is the one I ended up getting... a Redline D440. I'm 6'1", 350ish and like it so far (although I only have around 20 or so miles on it). It's a CrMo frame, 2x10, 29er. Things seem to be holding up well so far... although I fully intend on replacing the wheels soon for something with 36 spokes and better hubs.

  15. #15
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    I'm a Clyde but lighter than the OP. I had a Giant Yukon (26") for two years with no problems. Just upgraded to a Giant Talon 29er 1. Both are stock and both have been fine.
    I also ride a Giant Defy 3 Road Bike. Three years and one broken spoke later it's doing fine.

    I personally like Giant but make sure you get something that feels comfortable.

  16. #16
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    I just sold my GT 9r great bike they are onsale now at bike
    sdirect

  17. #17
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    thanks for the great info

    on to my next questions

    who makes the best hubs b-proof

  18. #18
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    These are no longer available but may be able to find used. I have Forte Loco (Performance Bike in house brand) they have held up to my fat butt and very hard riding. I also like Saint hubs. They are not too bad on price and super beefy.

  19. #19
    Fueled by Tigerblood
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    Hadley makes some tough hubs too, honestly, if you know anyone. That can build wheels, you can get some built up for you. A through axle may not be a bad idea either.

    I deff give you props for getting back into it, that's a big step, and biking is a great way to get healthy!

    Ride on!

  20. #20
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    I also ride a Giant Yukon and have ridden it for three years. I am 6'1" and started at 343lbs. Now i am down to 290. My bike has been amazing. I ride around town and have actually spent more time on trails than I ever thought i would. It' has taken all of it in stride and it is still bone stock.

  21. #21
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    ]My Yukon when it still had the Toras on it. Now has Dirt Jumper 2 forks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 400lbs BIG newbie needs help on bike-41042_144137112287706_143962768971807_247603_943103_n.jpg  

    Last edited by motorider; 04-14-2011 at 08:30 PM.

  22. #22
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    @motorider

    what is your set-up?

  23. #23
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    2006 or 07 giant yukon, dirt jumper 2 forks, race face single ring front cranks, sram x7 shifter and derailuer, forte loco wheels, hayes hfx9 brakes, only the frame is stock I only upgraded the parts cuz I loved the frame so much. In stock setup it was great too.never had one issue. I have had way better brand bikes or higher level models but this has been my favorite I will never get rid of it.

  24. #24
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    for bomb proof hubs, I have the phil wood tandem style hub that is built for a 36 hole rim. expensive and heavy but the internal parts a very tough. it's put on a ryno lite dh rim that has 14 gauge spokes. 10 years trouble free. the axles on the hubs are very thick. my cranks are a DH race face diablous. no shocks. old school v brakes. anohter plus with phil wood is that the bearings are sealed one pieace unit. the hubs that have loose ball bearings wear a groove in the axle........don't ask how many time I have trashed hubs...big size.....make shure the cranks are cold forged. its a process that adds strength but no weight.

    my newer bike is a surly pugsley. same hubs and spoke size. these bike were made for big folks. the tires are 4.0 wide. you can run 29 wheels on them very versitile. I get too me 6' 1" and 350 pounds plus. my local bike shop is run my 1 guy. does all the work and wheel building himslef. only sells what works for you.

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