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  1. #1
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    29er HT vs. 26er FS for clydesdale

    I am looking to upgrade from my entry level HT 26er to either a 29er HT or 26er FS. I am more of a cruser than a speeder and take it pretty easy on technical terrain for now. I have been riding for about 8 months now and my current bike gets the job done but i would like something a little more comfortable for a bigger guy, I am 5' 11" and 245 lbs. I ride pretty mellow single ascent/decent tracks and flat XC trails. I would like a FS but i am a little concerned with how well a FS will work with my weight. I am looking at a specialized camber comp but have not narrowed it down to any 29ers yet. I am interested in 29ers and would gladly take a 29er HT if is the better option. My only concern with a 29er HT is its ease of climbing over my current 26er ht. Do they climb as well as a 26er HT? From what i have read a 29er takes a little more work to get up to speed so i am assuming that it will take quite a bit more to get started up a climb than a 26er, even more of an effort difference than that of the difference between the two wheels on a level surface.

    What does every one think would be the better option and why?

    Thanks,

    AB

  2. #2
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    I have a 29er HT. I've never really climbed on a 26" and noticed a difference. I might now I guess but from what I understand 29ers roll better, but climb worse. You may not notice it though if you stand and crank.

    A FS will require a lot of suspension tuning for a heavier guy. I sat on a trance and bottomed it out without tuning. Some FS have great climbing ability, some are heavy bob, it depends how much travel you decide to go with. Someone else much more in tune with FS bikes can help there.

    If you're riding pretty mellow stuff, then a HT 29er is going to cost less, and perform better then your current bike. A FS will be overkill for every day riding over mellow ground. Unless you wanna do some 4 hour rides, then it'd save your back a bit.

    /my $0.02

  3. #3
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    245 pounds is not too heavy for FS tuning and 5'11" is plenty big enough for a 29er to fit without issues. You need to ride the larger wheel and see what you think. There is no reason to make it a choice between FS and 29", you can do both. A 29" wheel is not significantly harder to accelerate and is not inherently poorer in climbing, it depends on the particular bikes you consider. It is possible for 29" wheels and tires to be quite light with great acceleration and rolling properties. Most of the negative generalizations of the larger wheels are meaningless once you get away from the smallest sizes. Try and see.

  4. #4
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    As you are a big guy, not that big, but a big guy you need to pay a bit more attention when getting a FS, but still quite easy.

    simple rule of thumb, but 1 level more hardcore than you ride.
    This will get you a stiffer ride that can take more abuse.

    I ride a Niner WFO with a Dorado, most of my riding is XC/trail and the bike works great. If I rode an XC FS it would be floppy.

    Get something like a Niner WFO, or RIP9 and you will tick all your boxes.
    With your power (bigger guys have bigger legs) they will accelerate well, roll fast, climb well and be awesome on the DH.
    One other basic thing for a big guy, through axles front is a must, back is also important (I could bend my rear triangle enough to shift gear just by pushing hard.)
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  5. #5
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    Yeah, as said, go for a test ride on a 29er. I was interested a while back, so I rented a HT 29er (Specialized with good components) for a few days. Took it on trails that I take with my HT 26er, and just did not see much difference. A little easier to get over rocks (maybe) and a little harder to turn sharp (maybe). Not much difference to me. I don't remember any difference in climbing. I doubt I would see any other differences between my FS 26er and a FS 29er. I decided it wasn't worth the investment, especially since I have nice bikes already.

    And you should decide if you want a HT or FS, since, of course, they ride differently. Seems like a HT may still be good for your trails (and on xc trails, they are a lot more fun than FS). Seems to be some nice FS 29ers out there.

    I am 6'3" and 260lbs, and ride a couple of FSs, so, no, you are not too big for FS.

  6. #6
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    I am almost exactly your size. My advice; get a 29er FS. I came off a 26FS and the 29er outclimbs the 26er 6 days a week and twice on Sunday. The only time I wish I had a 29 HT is when I want to do a long ride on paved/fire/gravel roads and paths. I do them on the FS anyway. I would suggest getting the 29er FS and get a second bike(HT) later. BTW I ride a GF R-Fish. no problems at all. I am 5"11 - 6' depending on the time of day and whi os measuring me with 32" inseam and ride a 19" frame.

  7. #7
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    ok so the FS 29er has been brought up a few times. there is to reasons i havent looked at 29er FS bikes. First, the cost it is definatly the most expensive option of the three. secondly, from what i understand is the main benifit of the 29er is that it clears roots and rocks and things to make for a bit smoother ride but a FS 26er will also ride smoother over those obsticles smoothly. So what would intise me to go with a FS 29er and not just a 29er ht or 26er fs? obviously the 29er fs will carry momentum better than the 26er fs because of the biggers wheel base but is that going to be the only benifit over the 26er FS? i dont plan on racing and am not trying to fly through the trails so im not to concerned about losing a little speed over obstacles.

  8. #8
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    i also enjoy the longer rides and am rarely done before 5 hours so that fs will be better for that but i havent really been uncomfortable riding my HT for that amount of time.

  9. #9
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    Don't know how old you are, but I've found that as I enter my 40s, my back hurts under or after strain. I went FS and it makes a real difference. I haven't ridden a FS 29, so can't give you advice on one over the other. What I CAN tell you is that I own a Camber Comp and get a lot of bob out of the shock. I'm seriously considering buying a better shock or moving up to a DW link bike.

  10. #10
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    Thats a bumber about the camber. Has anyone else had this issue

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwrides
    What I CAN tell you is that I own a Camber Comp and get a lot of bob out of the shock. I'm seriously considering buying a better shock or moving up to a DW link bike.
    Have you tried the lock out?
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    Have you tried the lock out?
    Maybe on the street. On a section with multiple rooty and steep climbs and drops this isn't practical.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ab rider
    Thats a bumber about the camber. Has anyone else had this issue
    Most people buy better models that come with a shock that has pro-pedal, so doubt you will get much feedback.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwrides
    Maybe on the street. On a section with multiple rooty and steep climbs and drops this isn't practical.
    Do you have the sag set correctly for your weight? Too little air will add to the bob. Or, if you have the sag set correctly, you can turn the rebound down just to the point of the shock stacking and that will help reduce bob.

    The Cambers, even the Comp, are decent climbing bikes and even with the basic shock, some tuning is possible to reduce bob.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  15. #15
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    29er HT...I'll never ride another mini-bike under any circumstances.
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