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  1. #1
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    280 pounder needs a bike

    Hi everyone
    Jon here from Minnesota, I am looking at getting back into riding. I am around 6'2 280#, I am working on lightening the load but have a body type that will more than likely never get lower than 215-220. I used to ride bmx in my younger years, along with some mt biking. I am afraid that I might be spending a lot of time fixing the bike that I choose. I am very competative with friends so being last in line does not work for me, so I am going to need help choosing a bike that will not fold under the stresses that I will most certainly put it through. The primary riding location will be at the cuyuna trails in Crosby Minnesota, any advice would be much appreciated.

    Budget is 1000.00-1500.00
    XC Hard tail

  2. #2
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    You will really need to test ride as many bikes as possible. If I were in your spot, I would consider putting $1000 into an entry-level hardtail, and then another $300-$400 on a burlier wheelset like the Azonic Outlaws. You aren't going to get a sweet fork at your pricepoint, and wheels are the things I used to break most before getting a bomb-proof set handbuilt for me. Don't forget to budget for a helmet and some gloves. If you anticipate breaking things, you can save a lot of money by buying a basic toolkit like this.

    XLC 33 Piece Tool Kit at JensonUSA.com
    "So let's recap here:
    You asked a question.
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    You proceed to make an ass out of yourself."

  3. #3
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    Do you have any mechanical aptitude? I would by a motobecane fantom pro sl 29er hardtail from bikes direct. At that pricepoint you could get a nice carbon hardtail from performance bike also. There are a ton of options. Your weight is not that bad. You would probably be okay with either stock wheelset.

    29er Mountain Bikes: Rugged, Responsive & Fun 29er MTN Bikes

    29er Mountain Bikes | Full Suspension 29er | Hardtail 29er Mountain bikes | Titanium 29er Mountain Bikes | Singlespeed 29er Bikes

  4. #4
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    Excellent advice so far.

    One important thing to remember is to hit the same 'spec' type as your friends (so you can enjoy the same terrain they do and keep up) but as a big big Clyde go one spec higher on wheels, since those are the single most under-built stock component for Clyde weight-class riders. I know, I'm your height/weight and taco wheels.

    So, if they're riding XC bikes, get an XC bike but get, say, Halo Freedom Disc wheels, or get your LBS to build something up with Sun MTX-33 or Salsa Gordo or WTB Dual Duty. A lot of 200-ish Clydes will tell you to go with Flows, but those are not strong enough, especially if you are competitive with fast riders and start taking chances.

    Also remember the cost of your helmet, shorts, shoes, shirts, gloves, pump, extra tubes, tools, and probably camelbak.To get that all fired up, look at a minimum of $500. Otherwise your ass, feet, and hands will suffer.

    One last consideration: saddle. Most MTB have tiny ass hatchet saddles. Look into a Specialized BG saddle in a 155mm width if your hips are anything like mine. A sore taint is the single thing that will keep you from riding and with the mass you have sitting on it compared to a normal man, you need to protect it. Very, very carefully.
    Last edited by schnee; 10-15-2011 at 12:42 PM.

  5. #5
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    Thanks everyone very helpful! Is there a frame in particular I should look for, that is going to take abuse better than others or will any name brand due?

  6. #6
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    The frame is usually not the weakest link when considering a Clyde bike.

  7. #7
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    Would building the bike I want be a better alternative to buying one from a local bike shop or could the price tag get to far out of hand. After all winter is upon us here in MN so its not like I will be riding it right away. Maybe choose a frame then fork, wheels etc. Then by spring/ summer be ready to roll with a beefy beast that I wont have to work on as much. Or am I dreaming?

  8. #8
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    I am just kinda picky and tend to research all my alternatives especially when I could end up spending money fixing things that are inferior to start with. It sucks spending money to fix something that I could have spent a little more on to start with. Then on top of it having to sit out cuz I am waiting for parts.

  9. #9
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    taint lol

    [QUOTE=schnee;8540291]Excellent advice so far.

    One important thing to remember is to hit the same 'spec' type as your friends (so you can enjoy the same terrain they do and keep up) but as a big big Clyde go one spec higher on wheels, since those are the single most under-built stock component for Clyde weight-class riders. I know, I'm your height/weight and taco wheels.

    So, if they're riding XC bikes, get an XC bike but get, say, Halo Freedom Disc wheels, or get your LBS to build something up with Sun MTX-33 or Salsa Gordo or WTB Dual Duty. A lot of 200-ish Clydes will tell you to go with Flows, but those are not strong enough, especially if you are competitive with fast riders and start taking chances.

    Also remember the cost of your helmet, shorts, shoes, shirts, gloves, pump, extra tubes, tools, and probably camelbak.To get that all fired up, look at a minimum of $500. Otherwise your ass, feet, and hands will suffer.

    One last consideration: saddle. Most MTB have tiny ass hatchet saddles. Look into a Specialized BG saddle in a 155mm width if your hips are anything like mine. A sore taint is the single thing that will keep you from riding and with the mass you have sitting on it compared to a normal man, you need to protect it. Very, very carefully.[/QUOTE

    Lol I am aware I used a rental rocky mountain last weekend my legs were not sore but damn my ass still kinda hurts. Lol by the way what size nine do you ride that rocky was a 19.5 and I kinda felt like a bear riding a unicycle. Thanks for the help.

  10. #10
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    I'm 6-3, ride a Large Niner RIP9. I'm usually on an XL (or 22") but the Niner brand runs large.

    Really, for your first bike I wouldn't over-analyze it. You can't really afford to with that budget, because building yourself is more expensive than getting a new full bike. Most components are fine for a clyde, it's just wheels that really suck. I'd work with an LBS and see if they'd make a wheel swap part of the purchase and buy back the original wheels (or just eBay 'em yourself).

    Ride that for a little while, and if you want to start swapping in burlier parts, then check out Pricepoint (love that place) or start crawling the classifieds here for deals. That's what I've generally done and it works out well because I only buy the stuff that I obviously need.

    In a year or a few, if you get really into riding, then you'll have a lot better idea of what you want/need in your second bike and you'll probably be a lot more informed too.

    Good luck. Hope that helps.

  11. #11
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    I would recommend buying a bike with a lifetime warranty on the frame and expect to upgrade the wheels. If you ride hard you will crack the frame at some point. Trek has swapped out two frames for me and have upgraded them each time.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesspal View Post
    The frame is usually not the weakest link when considering a Clyde bike.
    wheels?

  13. #13
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    Jon,

    You're getting some good advice here. Like most have said, I would focus on picking up a good set of wheels and work from there. Most other parts will hold up to your weight and at your price point you're not really going to be able to buy a lot of weight weenie stuff anyhow.
    As far as frame goes see if you can't pick up a last years model for cheap or find a good used one on this site, etc. Frames for the most part will be fine for your weight and torque that you'll be putting out. I'm 6'6" and 290 ish and after taccoing my stock DT Swiss 29er wheels that came on my Stumpy FSR I went ahead and just dropped the cash on a hand built wheel set and haven't looked back. I went with Flows and King hubs with 36 spoke count (butted DT Swiss with brass nips). They've been absolutely bomb proof. You could go with Hope hubs or another cheaper brand to keep the cost down. Other than a hand built set I've heard the Mavic rims (not sure which ones) were holding up pretty good. They're the rims with the bladed spokes?? Maybe somebody here knows which ones they are.
    Best is to just get into a bike and start riding. If something breaks, replace it with a more stout part when the funds are available. That's the price we pay for beeing Clydes...

    I wish I was into biking when I lived in MN. I bet you have some nice trails up there near you.
    Good luck with your build/purchase.

  14. #14
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    Thanks Bunyan I think the plan is I am going to build a bike I have all winter to buy parts as I go so I think I am going to go bomb proof from the start. A buddy of mine is a very good builder so he is going to help me put it together when I get everything. I am currently looking for a kona hoss frame to start with. My buddy has talked me into the hoss and I think it suits me for obvious reasons, if you know of a 20"hoss hoss let me know.

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