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  1. #1
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    20mm axel conversion

    I'm a 260lb guy who rides all mountain and gonna try some downhill this year. I'm buying a new fork and was wondering if I should upgrade to a 20mm from my standard 9mm axel because of my weight and riding style? Also if I do can I just get a new hub and use my exsisting rim as long as whole number is the same? and is there any downsides to 20mm cause I also do some casual riding around. thanks

  2. #2
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    if you upgrade the fork you will need new hubs if the fork only has 20TA. there is not that much to worry about it is just going to feel a lot stiffer and not twichy

  3. #3
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    If you were 100lb less, Id still say going to a 20mm axle would be a great upgrade. At your weight, 9mm shouldnt even be a consideration. No downsides, all upsides!

    You'll more than likely need new spokes with your new hub.

  4. #4
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    ok. just wish there were more used 20mm out there. If i get new spokes do I need new rims?

  5. #5
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    Some hubs can be converted to 20mm, but we would need to know which you have. If its not convertible, it might be cheaper to buy a new wheel than rebuild your old wheel with the new hub.

    Also 15mm is becoming the new norm, and I would say it perform just as well as 20mm. And it'll be easier to find 15mm stuff.
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  6. #6
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    You should go to a thru axle, regardless of your weight or riding style, if you have a suspension fork, it should have a thru axle. They are better than qr in every way.

    15 or 20 is mostly a matter of what travel you want to run. There aren't that many options in shorter travel 20mm forks. I believe what matters is the thru axle, and how it attaches to the fork, more so than the diameter.

  7. #7
    Swimming thru the Smog
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    20mm hubs/wheels are not hard to find. All DH forks have 20mm, as well as the fox 36, Lyrik, basically any fork you should have on a clyde AM bike will have a 20mm axle.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qubo_2408 View Post
    ok. just wish there were more used 20mm out there. If i get new spokes do I need new rims?
    No, you won't need a new rim per-se.

    You will get a much better value buying a complete wheel than you will trying to rebuild a rim onto a new hub and spokes. Unless this rim is brand new and something special I would just buy a complete.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  9. #9
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    FWIW- I don't even let my kids ride with qr anymore.
    I have their bikes setup with Marzocchi 4x WC forks that are 100mm and 20mm axles. I run rear 10mm thru axles as well.

    QR do not belong on MTB bikes IMO.

  10. #10
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    Qubo, If you are going to get a new fork, then changing to 20mm (or even 15mm) will result in less fork flex (for a number of reasons).

    Tell us something about yourself, and we will be able to give you better advice. Reply back on what fork, rim, and hub you are using now, and generally what kind of riding you are doing, and what kind of riding you think you are moving to.

    FYI, I was at 260 for a long time (now getting less). I use 9mm QR, 15mm, and 20mm depending on the bike and riding. I doubt I will never change my XC hardtail from a 9mm, but found 20mm forks on my bigger bikes provide much less flex through the rocks. What is appropriate really depends on the bike/fork, the type of riding, and the rider.

  11. #11
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    If you front wheel rack mount your bike for transporting, don't forget to pickup the 20mm or 15mm rack adapter...

    FWIW i definitely notice the stiffness going from my QR Fox to my 20mm Marz!
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  12. #12
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    Here you go--new front wheel with 20mm hub for $172

    Flow 26in Wheel ZTR HD Hub Front Wheel Only - WS183F
    Last edited by Trackho; 03-06-2012 at 05:10 PM.

  13. #13
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    While I definitely think going to a through axle is an excellent idea, people (very large people included) have been getting by with 9mm QR for quite a long time with a minimum of catastrophic failures. Many, many DH races have been won with 9mmQR over the years.

    What bike are you riding now?

    Not too long ago, there were 'AM' type forks still being made with 9mmQR. That said, I am curious because if it is a fairly new bike that came with a 9mmQR fork, it's not likely to be a great candidate for DH racing. Hanging a big fork on a bike not designed for it isn't really the answer.

    If we know what we're dealing with, it will be easier to offer well considered suggestions.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    Not too long ago, there were 'AM' type forks still being made with 9mmQR. That said, I am curious because if it is a fairly new bike that came with a 9mmQR fork, it's not likely to be a great candidate for DH racing. Hanging a big fork on a bike not designed for it isn't really the answer.

    If we know what we're dealing with, it will be easier to offer well considered suggestions.
    This is a really good point. You can't just put a longer fork on any bike and expect it to be instantly able to be a DH bike, usually you end up with a bike that is unrideable.

    In addition to telling us what bike you're dealing with, maybe you could shed some light on what trails you'll be looking to do. When you say "downhill" the people who are very familiar with bikes get a very specific type of terrain in their head which usually involves very high speed and a chairlift ride to the top. Is that what your idea of downhill is? Because if it is, that's not the kind of terrain you want a cobbled together bike for.
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