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  1. #1
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    2 rides, 2 broken spokes

    This blows. I have only had my bike back for one day after the frame swap and replacing of a broken spoke in the rear wheel and guess what, I broke another one. I think it's time for my to invest in a new rear wheel. If these spokes aren't going to make it through a 3 hour XC ride under my 6'3" 215 lb butt, they have got to go. Are they the weak link, or is it flexing of my rim and/or hub that could be putting extra stress on that 14ga stainless wire? It was the same scene as the first failure. It looks like it just tore out of the nipple.

    I know there have been posts like this before and they're full of useful info, but I just wanted to b!tch a little bit. I'll search for a good cheap and moderately light set of wheels in those old posts.

    Ian
    from the ATX

    *EDIT* - I'm riding a 2005 Kona Kikapu with the stock Shimano FH-M475 rear hub and Sun Black Eye rims.
    Last edited by hallin222; 03-05-2006 at 05:34 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallin222
    This blows. I have only had my bike back for one day after the frame swap and replacing of a broken spoke in the rear wheel and guess what, I broke another one. I think it's time for my to invest in a new rear wheel. If these spokes aren't going to make it through a 3 hour XC ride under my 6'3" 215 lb butt, they have got to go. Are they the weak link, or is it flexing of my rim and/or hub that could be putting extra stress on that 14ga stainless wire? It was the same scene as the first failure. It looks like it just tore out of the nipple.

    I know there have been posts like this before and they're full of useful info, but I just wanted to b!tch a little bit. I'll search for a good cheap and moderately light set of wheels in those old posts.

    Ian
    from the ATX

    *EDIT* - I'm riding a 2005 Kona Kikapu with the stock Deore rear hub and Sun Black Eye rims.
    I'm about your size and I had really good luck with Sun Rhyno Lites on XT disc hubs. I puts lots of XC miles on these w/o touching them. You can get a set of these fairly inexpensively, i believe

  3. #3
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    www.Jensonusa.com has a good price on the rhynolites with xt hubs, especially if you want to go with the 36 spoke version. I got those on clearance for $130 and I think they are down to 120 if they still have them. Otherwise they cary the 32 spoke version as well. So far I like them and the general concensus of this forum seems to be that they are great wheels.

    Chris

  4. #4
    Slowest Rider
    Reputation: BigLarry's Avatar
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    What works for me

    I'm not an expert, but you may want to check the wheel build at another shop. It could be all the spokes are too tight or not uniform enough and adding to the stress. I've heard elsewhere on the drivetrain forum that a 32 spoke wheel is as strong as a 36 spoke build, with a strong rim and a good build.

    I used to weigh 270, over 300 with gear, and destroy parts regularly, even though I never do more than a 2' drop, but lots of technical XC riding.

    I had a Bontrager disk rim on my previous Fuel, and it never broke or bent in over 1500 miles, even though the frame broke three times now. The spokes never broke either.

    Nevertheless, to make sure of a strong rim on my new Heckler to reduce potential problems, I went with the Mavic XM321 (on an XT Hub), which was recommended on many posts here. It's done great for me with 1500 tough miles on it in just over a year (but I'm now ~230 - 255 with gear). No breaks or warps on wheel or 14 guage spokes.

    It makes sense that wheel flex could enhance spoke breakage. So a strong rim can help with wheel flex relative to the hub.

    As for overall steering flex, a 20 mm front axle can help, which I don't have with my Marz AM1 fork. The AM1 has 32 mm fork arms so its QR is plenty stiff though. It's even rated for 8" disk brakes with QR.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  5. #5
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    Correction: 2 RIDES = 3 BROKEN SPOKES!!!

    I just yanked off my rear wheel to take a closer look and it appears that there was ANOTHER busted spoke that I hadn't noticed before. It was still in it's proper location somehow, but had also snapped at the nipple end, drive side,

    I picked up Zinn's book today and plan to do more of my own work, so this is a good place to start I guess. Argh!

    Ian

  6. #6
    Don't skid
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    I wieght 260 and used to brake spokes on my rear wheels, both road and mtb. I have a good wheel buider at the my LBS and had him rebuild my wheels and haven't had a problem since. For wheels the build quality is what matters the most. If you are looking for a cheap(er) fix then just rebuild what you have. Of course that would be a good time to upgrade hubs or rims. Currently I am running XM321 (32 holes) on XT hubs with no problems (except for freehubs siezing up).
    I have Zinn's book too and it is very useful but replacing spokes is not the best place to start learning, as a novice you won't be able to get the tension balanced. If you want to learn how to build wheels start from scratch and build a complete wheel, its not that difficult just be patient.
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

  7. #7
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    I have found that once spokes start to break, then replacing individual spokes is really a waste of time: the others just break over a period of time. If you are happy with the hub and rim why not just get new double butted spokes and rebuild?

    Wombat

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat
    I have found that once spokes start to break, then replacing individual spokes is really a waste of time: the others just break over a period of time. If you are happy with the hub and rim why not just get new double butted spokes and rebuild?

    Wombat
    I'm stopping by my LBS tonight to discuss options. This time I'm just going to replace them again, but it's time to start looking at an alternative action. I don't want to have to make a stop by the LBS every Monday to fix the stuff I broke over the weekend.

    I know someone else said this isn't the type of thing a noob should atempt, but is is worth me looking into also purchasing a wheel truing stand and spoke torque wrench. What exactly does a spoke torque wrench look like. I have 2 traditional long-handled 3/8" drive ft-lbs and in-lbs ones, but this bicycle stuff is still relatively new to me. Harleys, I've got down. MTBs, I'm still learning.

    Ian

  9. #9
    are we there yet?
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    [

    I know someone else said this isn't the type of thing a noob should atempt, but is is worth me looking into also purchasing a wheel truing stand and spoke torque wrench. What exactly does a spoke torque wrench look like.

    It's called a spoke tension meter. Look here for description:
    http://www.parktool.com/products/det...16&item=TM%2D1
    This is an excellent resource for wheelbuilding:
    http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/
    Good luck & cheers!
    Day, n. A period of twenty-four hours, mostly misspent.
    Ambrose Bierce

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