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  1. #1
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    143mm Sit bone measurement, please help with saddle / seat selections and fitment!

    Hello everyone, I recently got back into mountain biking, and I was wondering if you all could help me out?

    I just bought a new old stock 2012 Cannondale Flash 1 Alloy 26er and the stock seat is just killing me. I know i have to train the muscles down there to get used to riding again, but man even with padded shorts, it's like riding on wood.

    I am 5'9" and 270lbs with 21% body fat. I got my sit bones measured today and they were 143mm. Well low and behold that's the exact measurement of my saddle currently on bike.

    Can you all with similar sit bone measurements please recommend me a saddle?

    I searched but nothing came of it. I know people ask similar questions daily, but I'm not flying blindly, as I've already got my sit bone measurements.

    Thanks for any help in advance.

  2. #2
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    WTB Vigo Pro
    WTB Products – Saddles – Racing – Vigo
    143mm and replaceable Cro-Mo rails.

    The Pure V Pro is also very popular with the Clyde crowd, 148mm wide
    WTB Products – Saddles – Performance – Pure V
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  3. #3
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by idohcvtecexi View Post
    Hello everyone, I recently got back into mountain biking, and I was wondering if you all could help me out?

    I just bought a new old stock 2012 Cannondale Flash 1 Alloy 26er and the stock seat is just killing me. I know i have to train the muscles down there to get used to riding again, but man even with padded shorts, it's like riding on wood.

    I am 5'9" and 270lbs with 21% body fat. I got my sit bones measured today and they were 143mm. Well low and behold that's the exact measurement of my saddle currently on bike.

    Can you all with similar sit bone measurements please recommend me a saddle?

    I searched but nothing came of it. I know people ask similar questions daily, but I'm not flying blindly, as I've already got my sit bone measurements.

    Thanks for any help in advance.
    I have found the sit bone width measurements to be useless.
    I was measured by Bontrager to demo their new saddles. Was just barely in the "wide" range. Started with the "medium".
    Painful after an hour. Bonty sent a wide. Even more painful.
    Went back to my old saddles, which are MUCH narrower than even the "narrow" Bonty. No pain.
    Add in that different brands measure their sit bone widths differently and sheel shapes vary, they are not directly comparable.

    The ONLY way you can know if a saddle works for you is to ride it.

    I think one of the issues I had is the measuring system had me sit with my pelvis fairly upright, and I ride with it tilted forward.
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  4. #4
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    Goes to show how your mileage may vary. I suffered from pain and numbness in my crotch for a long time with various saddles before I got myself measured. Because I have a very slender build I always assumed my sit bones were narrow, but lo and behold, they were actually further apart from each other compared to average.

    When I had my sit bone width measured, the LBS guy put a box under my feet and I leaned forward, so the angle of my thighs were more comparable to a riding position instead of just sitting upright on a chair.

    My result was 143 mm as well, but that means the saddle should be wider. The sit bones should be on the saddle, not on its sides. From the Specialized website:
    If your sit bones measure out between 130mm and 160mm, and you ride a very Aerodynamic, racing or triathlon position, you should ride a 143mm saddle. All other riding positions should use a 155.
    So I got a 155 mm Romin Comp Evo (just level 2 padding, so it's quite hard) and never felt that good on a bike. The hardness took some getting used to without padded shorts, but at least now I felt like I was actually on my sit bones and the initial sore butt started hardening. Now I can ride the bike for hours straight without any trouble and no more fear of becoming impotent.

    My advice for anyone who suffers on the saddle is to get your sit bones measured, get a saddle of the proper width, avoid excessive padding and choose a model with a pressure relief recess or opening. It's not necessarily 100% accurate, but if you're currently in trouble, it's worth a try.

    Of course no amount of theory and measuring compares to actually riding, but it helped me look into a direction I hadn't observed before.
    Last edited by Saul Lumikko; 02-25-2013 at 02:38 PM.

  5. #5
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    I've been measured 3 different times at 3 different shops, came up w/ 3 different measurements. I'm a heavyweight, to me the shell has to be somewhat stiff, w/ some padding but not a lot. Many are way to flexy to me, which means uncomfortable after 30 minutes. Too much padding works the same way. Finding the right saddle is not easy

  6. #6
    Frys With That, Please
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Goes to show how your mileage may vary. I suffered from pain and numbness in my crotch for a long time with various saddles before I got myself measured. Because I have a very slender build I always assumed my sit bones were narrow, but lo and behold, they were actually further apart from each other compared to average.

    When I had my sit bone width measured, the LBS guy put a box under my feet and I leaned forward, so the angle of my thighs were more comparable to a riding position instead of just sitting upright on a chair.

    My result was 143 mm as well, but that means the saddle should be wider. The sit bones should be on the saddle, not on its sides. From the Specialized website:

    So I got a 155 mm Romin Comp Evo (just level 2 padding, so it's quite hard) and never felt that good on a bike. The hardness took some getting used to without padded shorts, but at least now I felt like I was actually on my sit bones and the initial sore butt started hardening. Now I can ride the bike for hours straight without any trouble and no more fear of becoming impotent.

    My advice for anyone who suffers on the saddle is to get your sit bones measured, get a saddle of the proper width, avoid excessive padding and choose a model with a pressure relief recess or opening. It's not necessarily 100% accurate, but if you're currently in trouble, it's worth a try.

    Of course no amount of theory and measuring compares to actually riding, but it helped me look into a direction I hadn't observed before.

    Good tech tips ! Thanks.
    2012 Cannondale Trail SL 29ER 4

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  7. #7
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    I'm a super-clyde that switched to a 143mm Specialized Henge saddle myself a year or so ago and have found it to be pretty comfortable - for a bike saddle anyway. (I've got two actually: one on my MTB and and one on my touring bike.) There's some flex to it but the seat isn't over padded. You also need to consider whether or not you need some type of arrangement to accomodate your "ahem" anatomy. The recessed groove in the center works well for me, but some prefer full-blown cut outs, and others are OK with just flat saddles. I ran a Brooks B17 on my touring bike for a couple of years but found that there was too much pressure on the center of seat for me and it was causing problems on longer rides. Good luck - let us know what you find!

  8. #8
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    I have been on an Ergon Saddle for about 4 months and it is rad. I measured at 144. It is very unique shape and design, very flat and pretty hard. I have ridden WTB saddles and Specialized saddles, both are ok, but not as comfortable as the Ergon. I offer this only as a lesser known alternative to the more popular brands. FYI, Ergon has 2 sizes(L and SM), I purchased the large. I believe it is 143, but I am not 100% on that. Hope it helps.

  9. #9
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    Koobi Classic Gel Sl. Stated width is 160, but it looks quite sleek. While padded well, the padding is quite dense, so you don't sink into it at all. It felt too firm at first, but I absolutely love it now.

    AM.

  10. #10
    Ergon Bike
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    Measurements for the SM3 saddles are....

    Small: 287 L x 135 W
    Large: 287 L x 146 W

    These measurements are taken from the longest and widest parts of the saddle. Most consumers are on the Large. Personally, I am 170 lbs with a 32 inch waist, I ride the Large.

    Jeff K
    Ergon USA

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