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  1. #1
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well *ouch* my bum hurts!

    Well after only an hour on my new Hardrock i've got saddle-sore butt-bones. Right now I'm looking at Brooks B-17 and the new B-68 saddles from Wallbike. Has anyone used that B-68? I think wider is better, like they used to say in those car commercials, but that 68 might be too much like a beach cruiser seat, and chafe more than is worth all the support. I've read good things so far about the B-17.

    Thoughts? Opinions? keep in mind im 6'5" and 355 lbs, so my sitting bones are a little wider than most. but im in good company here in clydesville.

  2. #2
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    I'm close in size to you (6'7" 320) I run a brooks B-17 on my touring bike. From day 1 it's been good and only gotten better. I did a road century earlier this year, and after 6.5 hours, yeah, I was hurting, but not nearly as bad as I was expecting. The B-17 seems a little wide for mountain bike use IMHO. I like to be able to get back behind the saddle easily. I've had good experiences with WTB saddles. I am currently running a WTB (I can't remember the specific one, but WTB does make a few different widths. It is on the wider end) and dig it. I do not typically ride for any longer than three hours, and it seems alright for that. At our size, stay away from titanium seat rails. I've killed a couple of saddles with them through normal use.

    If your new to riding... It'll get better, trust me. Your body will adjust.

    -Badger242

  3. #3
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    Don't sleep on the Brooks B72 saddle...it's wider at the back then the B17, has a unique spring design that doesn't "pogo"

  4. #4
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    Check out Koobi Saddles as well

    Just another option for you. Try out the Koobi saddles as well. I am 6'6'' 205# so I don't have quite the girth you do but I still had my saddle challenges until I found Koobi. A little wider than most mountain bike saddles but you get use to it after a while. There is a great pressure relief channel for little to no numbness of the neitherlands. i ride the au enduro on all of my bikes: hard tail ss, road, and FS 29er. I have hundreds of hours on these saddles and couldn't be more happy.

    A saddle is a personal gear item and not easy to get right. Good luck in your quest for a great saddle. Koobi can not be purchased in LBS, so if you are interested in checking out their saddles you will have to go to their website. The guy running the USA branch of the company is a stand up guy and gets you your product fast. He even included a small thank you gift when I purchased my third saddle from him.

    Cheers,
    BFE

  5. #5
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    thanks for all the replies fellas!

    I've looked into your recommendations and found that WTB is a cheaper alternative, Koobi is more pricey than even Brooks. I think i'll try out the WTB Comfort V Comp, since I'm mostly doing just flatland fitness riding, and no trails yet. Gotta make sure I can keep up the riding, and not get sidelined by a sore rear end.

    thanks again guys.

    Jim

  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    You have one ride on your bike?

    Having a sore bum during the first few rides is normal, to be expected, and not cause for getting out your credit card.

    Small adjustments to the position or angle might help if you can spot a part of the saddle that is causing you problems.

    I will not buy a wide saddle (unless I geta beach cruiser bike): it would restrict my movement on the bike.

  7. #7
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    Another vote for Koobi, I also searched for a long time to find a better one for me and the au enduro is the best one so far, and like BIGfatED i also got great service from the KOOBI person.

  8. #8
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    perttime, it's not that it hurts too much already, but that I can tell after one ride that the seat is to narrow and hard for me. While riding i could feel strain on my pelvis as the bones were wedged apart by the saddle. I do realize there will be an adjustment period, but I can safely say that the discomfort I felt would not go away after a time. The Comfort V Comp is only 3cm wider than the seat now, but it is softer and that may be all the additional width I'd need. Now i just need to find a bike shop around here to get it at so I can be sure before I buy (either that or buy online from a returnable dealer).

    again, thanks for the replies all.

    Jim

  9. #9
    Double-metric mtb man
    Reputation: Psycho Mike's Avatar
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    I'm only 6' and 240-ish, but I've got a large frame just the same.

    I've swapped the stocker on my Fisher for a WTB Lazer V saddle. It is fairly wide (like the 2nd widest that WTB makes in a mtb saddle) and I recently did a Century on it. At the end of 100 miles, my butt hurt, but it was more of the "I've never ridden for 7+ hours at a time with few breaks before" rather than the "this saddle sucks" type of pain.

    Maybe have a gander at a Lazer V, Pure V or similar on the wide end of WTB's line.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  10. #10
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    Saddle-soreness is pretty common when you first start riding. Make sure you're wearing proper riding shorts with a padded chamois as the padding will help absorb some of the vibrations and minimize friction.

    If the soreness continues, go to your LBS and try to get a recommendation for a new saddle. Keep in mind that being heavy might not translate to wide sit-bones. Specialized has a tool, that hopefully your LBS will also have, called an ass-o-meter that will measure the width of your sit-bones. At that point, your LBS could recommend a saddle that would come close to the measured width of your sit-bones, or they could put you on a Specialized BG saddle that matches the measured width. I've had good luck with this process and was put on a Specialized Alias 155 (for my road bike).

    Hope you get the sore-butt solved. It definitely sucks.
    :wq

  11. #11
    You know, for kids
    Reputation: madcap's Avatar
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    WTB Speed V Pro Gel for me. Kinda heavy but super comfy.

  12. #12
    Captain Underpants
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    WTB have always treated me right, just go with one of the wider saddles and you will be OK. I think I am using a WTB Laser as well.

  13. #13
    mtbr Buckeye...in Austin
    Reputation: eokerholm's Avatar
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mike
    I'm only 6' and 240-ish, but I've got a large frame just the same.

    I've swapped the stocker on my Fisher for a WTB Lazer V saddle. It is fairly wide (like the 2nd widest that WTB makes in a mtb saddle) and I recently did a Century on it. At the end of 100 miles, my butt hurt, but it was more of the "I've never ridden for 7+ hours at a time with few breaks before" rather than the "this saddle sucks" type of pain.

    Maybe have a gander at a Lazer V, Pure V or similar on the wide end of WTB's line.
    just upgraded from the Speed V (no issues) (3 seasons) to a Pure V.
    it tilts the pelvic bones moreso and correctly than the SpeedV.

    Great seat, great construction and the PureV is 250 g lighter!!

    I beat the crap out of my old Speed V.
    You can pick them up from wheelworld or performance cheap.
    Good stuff!

    The PureV was $120 from my LBS.
    The saddles have 30 day return policy, so you can try them out if you keep them in good shape.

    took the new seat on my trip and no issues with 4+ hours in the saddle for 5 straight days!

    Thought I'd share!

    Two Cheeks up vote for WTB!

  14. #14
    I plead the fizif
    Reputation: TronCarter's Avatar
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    I'm 6', 295lbs and after one or two rides on my Gary Fisher Wahoo with stock Bontrager Select saddle, I was convinced that I needed something wider. I have heard some describe this seat as a "thong". I ended up ordering a highly reviewed, wider seat with extra padding. I rode every day in the two weeks it took for it to get here and by that time I was used to the Bontrager. The new seat still sits in it's box in the closet.

    It takes a little while, but your seat will get used to your bike's seat.

  15. #15
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    One thing to bear in mind is that the wider the saddle the harder it can be to get "off the back" when you're going downhill. This is even more noticeable for clydes like myself with horse-sized thighs. I'm just riding the stock saddle on my bike at the moment. It hurt like hell for the first few rides, but now I can go for a few hours without pain. Padded shorts are a must, IMO.

  16. #16
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    Good job! I take it back!

    I'm getting more used to my stock Body Geometry saddle now. Last monday I rode 13+ miles sitting in the seat the whole time (XC/road rider two towns over) and had little to no discomfort afterwards. I have no experience with downhill riding, but I think i'd probably need to upgrade some of my stock parts before doing that. I think I'm sticking with my stock BG saddle for now.

    I also rode the bike lanes around town on Thursday for 1.5 hours or so, and again, little to no saddle-sore cheeks. All i can say is I LOVE my new bike. Cant imagine a better way to get your exercise, or to just enjoy the outdoors. Even if I do currently live in a jungle of the semi-urban variety.

    I'll be moving up the coast to San Luis Obispo to go back to Cal Poly, and I cant wait to explore the trails up there. There's a few loops of single track that actually begin and end on campus. Not to mention the city is a lot more bike friendly than the Inland Empire.

    Anyway, I know this thread started on a different topic, but hey, thanks for keeping it going guys. I've not made any progress in the weight department (as outlined in my blog and noted in the "Fat Boy Challenge" thread here), but I feel more energized, I'm eating better, and I feel as if this lifestyle change will be a permanent one. Which is what I was going for.

    Thanks for helping me find my way to better health and longer life. Not to mention all the sweet hours riding.

    Cheers,

    Jim

  17. #17
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    Also agree that you need to make sure you're wearing proper GOOD cycling shorts. I have a smallish saddle on my bike, a Terry Liberator Ti, and in my old shorts (a set of Zoic double shorts) my butt was fine, but rides two days in a row couldn't happen, because my butt didn't recover.

    I'm now riding a set of MEC Rapide shorts (in the MEC Huck outers) and have to say they are the best pair of shorts I have ridden...a nice THICK chamois pad that makes it very comfy to ride the bike. I ride every day to work now and there is zero discomfort with the new shorts.

    If you don't have many rides in on your bike, and you're not wearing good shorts, try giving a pair of decent biking shorts a try. The Rapides that I wear come in an XXL size which is big on me, so they should fit you as well, and the price won't break the bank. If you're "allergic" to wearing spandex as an outer layer (like I am hehe) then team 'em up with a second layer and you'll be laughing.

    Tim

  18. #18
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    thanks for the info there, tim.

    I took a look at those MEC shorts and according to their size chart, even the XXL wont fit. I have a 50-52 waist and huge thick thighs. Know anybody who makes em that big?

    I am currently just wearing gym shorts, but for now thats enough. I'm not riding more than 2 hours at a time, and with the heat creeping up early in the day and staying late, I cant always get up early enough to get a comfortable ride in. Work has me sleeping from 5am till noon some nights, and my sleep schedule is somewhat irregular as a result.

    Anyway, enough excuses. I'm hoping to get a ride in today after a bit of shut eye.

    Cheers!

    Jim
    Last edited by jimboyzguy; 07-31-2007 at 02:21 AM.

  19. #19
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    Jim, I think you'll find they fit REALLY big, much bigger than what the sizing chart from MEC says. I'm about a 40-42 waist, big tree trunk thighs, and I find they almost fit LOOSE on me. I "tried" to get some XL regular bike shorts on, and that was just not happening...while as I said the Rapides feel almost loose, so you MIGHT want to consider them, as they just might fit.

    If you're riding un-padded, I'll bet that is exactly why you're saddle is such a pain in the butt You can replace your saddle, but I don't know if that will fix the problem for you. You'll need riding shorts anyway, so why not try to find a pair of padded shorts, give 'em a go, and if that still doesn't work, then spring for a new seat.

    Hope that helps!

    tim

  20. #20
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    saddle soreness is the price you have to pay when starting out.. it takes a couple weeks of regular riding to overcome it.. (at least that is my experience)... Bear down and saddle up... it will go away eventually..

    Not sure what seat you have but I noticed a big improvement with the split saddles or whatever they are called..
    2007 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Expert
    Check out my rides/routes on Geoladders.com

    8/23/2007 292 lbs.
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