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  1. #101
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  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    Instead of mounting a chain link to a bolt, which seems kind of odd. I would have mounted a plate to the rack, with a hole for the bolt and a whole on the bottom for a carabiner.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neseth View Post
    Instead of mounting a chain link to a bolt, which seems kind of odd. I would have mounted a plate to the rack, with a hole for the bolt and a whole on the bottom for a carabiner.
    I just use two Velcro straps from Home Depot and each one is rated in excess of 100lbs.

    Simple and safe!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Think twice before going for 1UP racks-308ef960-1ddd-4218-be08-8196be6c79f2.jpeg  


  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I just use two Velcro straps from Home Depot and each one is rated in excess of 100lbs.

    Simple and safe!
    Do you have a picture of it mounted? Would love to get those straps for mine.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neseth View Post
    Instead of mounting a chain link to a bolt, which seems kind of odd. I would have mounted a plate to the rack, with a hole for the bolt and a whole on the bottom for a carabiner.
    Chain link is easier to find and cut/modify than a steep plate I guess.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    Chain link is easier to find and cut/modify than a steep plate I guess.
    No, I don't agree with that. It's pretty easy to get a peice of plate steel or aluminum. I'd probably try aluminum first to prevent galvanic corrosion and be sure to use stainless steel bolts. Here's a 1/2" thick plate of aluminum for $20. https://www.amazon.com/TEMCo-Aluminu...6KFGPJ4GJKFQJC

    You can just use an angle grinder with a cutting wheel to cut it, then drill a couple holes. Here's a cutting wheel: https://www.harborfreight.com/4-12-i...-pc-62804.html

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    Do you have a picture of it mounted? Would love to get those straps for mine.
    The carabiner end drops in the plate hole on the hitch and the Velcro strap just wraps around the horizontal tube on the 1Up rack. Itís a snap and one would even be enough.

    Even if the ball anchoring device failed, the rack momentum/force is always towards the vehicle and doubt it could slide back far enough to pull out. The weight is downward, it would not slide but all of that being said, one 100 pound Velcro strap would ensure that it would never pull out!

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neseth View Post
    No, I don't agree with that. It's pretty easy to get a peice of plate steel or aluminum. I'd probably try aluminum first to prevent galvanic corrosion and be sure to use stainless steel bolts. Here's a 1/2" thick plate of aluminum for $20. https://www.amazon.com/TEMCo-Aluminu...6KFGPJ4GJKFQJC

    You can just use an angle grinder with a cutting wheel to cut it, then drill a couple holes. Here's a cutting wheel: https://www.harborfreight.com/4-12-i...-pc-62804.html
    But why all the work and effort and drilling ( modifying) the rack when it can simply be strapped to your vehicle, IMO.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    But why all the work and effort and drilling ( modifying) the rack when it can simply be strapped to your vehicle, IMO.
    Or ulocked. Which adds a level of security.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    Or ulocked. Which adds a level of security.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    If security is an issue,

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    If security is an issue,
    It's ALWAYS an issue.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    It's ALWAYS an issue.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I guess for some more than others.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neseth View Post
    No, I don't agree with that. It's pretty easy to get a peice of plate steel or aluminum. I'd probably try aluminum first to prevent galvanic corrosion and be sure to use stainless steel bolts. Here's a 1/2" thick plate of aluminum for $20. https://www.amazon.com/TEMCo-Aluminu...6KFGPJ4GJKFQJC

    You can just use an angle grinder with a cutting wheel to cut it, then drill a couple holes. Here's a cutting wheel: https://www.harborfreight.com/4-12-i...-pc-62804.html
    Just a little safety note: Cutoff wheels are great for ferrous materials (iron, steel etc) but is NOT the right tool for cutting aluminum. The wheel will get "loaded up" and in extreme cases, it can cause the wheel to break apart. A fairly dangerous situation.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    But why all the work and effort and drilling ( modifying) the rack when it can simply be strapped to your vehicle, IMO.
    I've been using the velcro strap that 1up supplied, seems strong enough to me, I'm sure 1up has done some rigorous testing otherwise they wouldn't supply that. No need to go through all that extra effort.

  15. #115
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    Lots of discussion about the security of the 1up system and how well it does or does not work. Why not just drill a hole in the thing and use a standard 3$ hitch pin???

    Think twice before going for 1UP racks-1up.jpg
    In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pains.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalkerfiveo View Post
    Lots of discussion about the security of the 1up system and how well it does or does not work. Why not just drill a hole in the thing and use a standard 3$ hitch pin???

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You forgot the mechanism inside that tightens the ball to snug it up on the hitch receiver. Drilling a hole through the shaft is NOT AN OPTION

  17. #117
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    1UP needs to incorporate something like what Thule T2 Pros have.

    Think twice before going for 1UP racks-fullpage_fullpage_thule-t2-pro-hitch-rack-close-up-2017.jpg

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    1UP needs to incorporate something like what Thule T2 Pros have.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That is basically what the Quik Rack Mach 2 has. I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for any changes from 1up.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    You forgot the mechanism inside that tightens the ball to snug it up on the hitch receiver. Drilling a hole through the shaft is NOT AN OPTION
    I don't own one and wasn't aware of that. Hence my asking. Sounds like 1up tried to reinvent the wheel and got a little too fancy for their own good.
    In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pains.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    Do you have a picture of it mounted? Would love to get those straps for mine.
    Here it is in action!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Think twice before going for 1UP racks-f79c1eff-607b-4d86-87d5-829213227d98.jpg  


  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    1UP needs to incorporate something like what Thule T2 Pros have.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Hate those damn things. I can't use a rack with one of those side pivot pins because the subie has an ecohitch that's hidden in the bumper.

    A plain pin works fine. To use a 1up hitch rack, I would have to use chain for security to reach the loops on the hitch. Ulock would not work. But it is a viable solution. Those damn side pivot pins that seem to be becoming ubiquitous will never work.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottarex View Post
    1UP needs to incorporate something like what Thule T2 Pros have.
    Guaranteed rust after a few years? Lol

  23. #123
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    I still get notifications for this post (even though I wrote it back in 2014).
    I have to say that having this rack for over 3.5 years made me appreciate it more and more. It's the best rack I ever had and I think I just got some bad sales rep when I first called them. Since then I contacted 1Up for service parts and locks (someone hit the rack) and they were super fast to respond and made sure I got all of my stuff with next day delivery.

    If I had to buy a new rack today, it would be a 1UP for sure!

  24. #124
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    I bought a 1up for my wife's car four years ago and it has been removed probably once a year. It has never loosened so I am not really concerned, but we also use the Velcro strap as recommended by the manufacturer.

    My 1up gets removed a couple of times a month so I can pull my utility trailer so I never worry about it loosening. I use the factory strap for it but think rickcin's method may be faster to connect, saving me at least 10 seconds per change. That adds up to a few minutes per year. Seriously, I do like those straps more, looping the velcro through the back loop on the strap and then the safety loops on the receiver can be a pain. I will pick one up for my car while my wife keeps her factory strap.
    Last edited by mtpisgah; 04-30-2018 at 06:33 PM.

  25. #125
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    After installation of my 1 Up rack, I decided to modify rickcin's idea and just use 4 chain links attached to the rack by attaching the chain to the bottom bold on the side ( no drilling) and a carabiner, good to go. $4.00 and 15min to fab and install.

  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalkerfiveo View Post
    I don't own one and wasn't aware of that. Hence my asking. Sounds like 1up tried to reinvent the wheel and got a little too fancy for their own good.
    this thread is full of people trying to solve something thats not really a problem. the provided strap that comes with the rack is perfectly capable of holding the rack in the hitch if the tightening mechanism were to fail.

  27. #127
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    I've had my rack for about 8 months. Probably used it for 20 day trips. Left it on for the weekend and noticed on Tuesday night the single tongue bolt had loosened up and all that was holding the rack to the car was the safety strap. What are you guys doing to prevent the bolt from loosening?

  28. #128
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    I appreciate Sooner518's opinion, however, i feel with just a little fore thought, I might be able to beat the effects of mother nature (velcro deteriorating and the inevitable potholes that plague our streets each spring). I'm a big fan of the 6 P's, and if I can buy a little peace of mind for $4 and 15 min, it's a cheap investment. I haven't noticed the bolt loosening yet, although I do check for looseness each time I load up.

  29. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by guido316 View Post
    After installation of my 1 Up rack, I decided to modify rickcin's idea and just use 4 chain links attached to the rack by attaching the chain to the bottom bold on the side ( no drilling) and a carabiner, good to go. $4.00 and 15min to fab and install.
    Definitely a last long option and I would never be an advocate of drilling or changing the rack in any way. Like you stated, itís just easy and cheap to provide a safety line with materials other than Velcro.

  30. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by guido316 View Post
    I appreciate Sooner518's opinion, however, i feel with just a little fore thought, I might be able to beat the effects of mother nature (velcro deteriorating and the inevitable potholes that plague our streets each spring). I'm a big fan of the 6 P's, and if I can buy a little peace of mind for $4 and 15 min, it's a cheap investment. I haven't noticed the bolt loosening yet, although I do check for looseness each time I load up.
    i dont think theres anything wrong with spending a bit of extra time and money to make 10000% sure it doesnt fall off. it just seems highly unlikely that it will come off if you tighten the bolt and secure the strap. ive had mine for 2 years straight and the strap doesnt seem even close to losing its efectiveness.

  31. #131
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    The thing is a nightmare when driving on back roads. Logging roads, dirt roads, rough roads. I used it for the first time this last weekend at Trans-Cascadia work event in the Gifford Pinchot NF and the roads can get pretty bumpy. I was having to stop and re-tighten the bolt often as it would loosen even after 5-10 miles of driving.

    Granted most people are not driving crappy roads, so it's maybe not an issue - but it's for sure a design flaw.

  32. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by sketchbook View Post
    The thing is a nightmare when driving on back roads. Logging roads, dirt roads, rough roads. I used it for the first time this last weekend at Trans-Cascadia work event in the Gifford Pinchot NF and the roads can get pretty bumpy. I was having to stop and re-tighten the bolt often as it would loosen even after 5-10 miles of driving.

    Granted most people are not driving crappy roads, so it's maybe not an issue - but it's for sure a design flaw.
    Mine does not loosen, drove miles and miles of bumpy forest service road over the past couple weeks.

    Are you lifting up on the rack as you tighten the bolt?

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by sketchbook View Post
    The thing is a nightmare when driving on back roads. Logging roads, dirt roads, rough roads. I used it for the first time this last weekend at Trans-Cascadia work event in the Gifford Pinchot NF and the roads can get pretty bumpy. I was having to stop and re-tighten the bolt often as it would loosen even after 5-10 miles of driving.

    Granted most people are not driving crappy roads, so it's maybe not an issue - but it's for sure a design flaw.
    Wanna sell it?

  34. #134
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    I took mine on the back of my trailer on some very rough and washboard roads and it never loosened at all. Did have an instance where my wife didn't get it mounted quite tight enough initially and it did loosen though. I just make sure to tighten as much as I can and then pull, push etc.. on the rack to make sure it is really secure.

  35. #135
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    I've had mine for four months now. I installed it and have left it on through dirt roads, Spokane pot holes, and interstate speeds, and I'm very impressed with its performance. No loosening for me.

  36. #136
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    Honestly, I have used my rack for over 4 years and have kept it on for most of that entire time. I have driven bikes on the highway for 1000's of miles. I check the rack every now and then but it has never come loose to a point of being an issue. The bolt does get looser and I tighten it but again, I would do that with any rack.
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  37. #137
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    When driving on the highway with a 1.25" Quick Single, the rack starts to vibrate up and down, especially on concrete pavement with expansion joints. On some roads, it seems to hit resonant frequency and just start vibrating like crazy. Pretty disconcerting to see in the rearview mirror!

    Bike is a Pole Evolink 140, XL, 52" WB, so it barely fits in the rack. The arms are at like 70d, but so far it has held.

    I'm thinking the combination of a 23lb rack and 31lb bike is not a good one.

    Anyone else experience this?

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada 29er View Post
    When driving on the highway with a 1.25" Quick Single, the rack starts to vibrate up and down, especially on concrete pavement with expansion joints. On some roads, it seems to hit resonant frequency and just start vibrating like crazy. Pretty disconcerting to see in the rearview mirror!

    Bike is a Pole Evolink 140, XL, 52" WB, so it barely fits in the rack. The arms are at like 70d, but so far it has held.

    I'm thinking the combination of a 23lb rack and 31lb bike is not a good one.

    Anyone else experience this?
    Somethings wrong. Doubt thereís a resonant frequency issue. Make sure itís snug in the receiver, if there is play, remove that. The aluminum rack is more springy than other racks.

    We have over 25,000 miles on ours at speeds up to 85mph with zero issues. Weíve carried 4 bikes on it even and every combination of mtb or road bike from 1 to 4 bikes. We also inadvertently almost took the SUV airborne when we hit an expansion ridge in pavement outside of Denver at 80mph. Nothing budged on the rack. That had four bikes on it.

  39. #139
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    Yeah, I'm kind of scratching my head. There is no play between the hitch and receiver arm. The hitch seems solids to the frame. Its a Curt hitch. I ordered the Curt stabilizer strap, which I think may help or eliminate the vibration. https://www.amazon.com/CURT-18050-Bi.../dp/B003721CC8

    Its definitely a resonant frequency issue between the rack/hitch/and car. Certain roads and wind can initiate it. I'm curious if a heavier rack would be more stable, not that I like heavy racks from a practical standpoint.

  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada 29er View Post
    Yeah, I'm kind of scratching my head. There is no play between the hitch and receiver arm. The hitch seems solids to the frame. Its a Curt hitch. I ordered the Curt stabilizer strap, which I think may help or eliminate the vibration. https://www.amazon.com/CURT-18050-Bi.../dp/B003721CC8

    Its definitely a resonant frequency issue between the rack/hitch/and car. Certain roads and wind can initiate it. I'm curious if a heavier rack would be more stable, not that I like heavy racks from a practical standpoint.
    I doubt the resonance issue. If so, add more weight to the rack and/or change the length the rack is inserted into the receiver and it will dramatically change the resonance frequency to validate your claim.

    Take video of it from another car alongside. You may be surprised to find there is far less movement than you think there is. I did just that and was quite surprised. Big difference looking at it through the rear view mirror vs from alongside.

    And contact 1up and talk with them.

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada 29er View Post
    When driving on the highway with a 1.25" Quick Single, the rack starts to vibrate up and down, especially on concrete pavement with expansion joints. On some roads, it seems to hit resonant frequency and just start vibrating like crazy. Pretty disconcerting to see in the rearview mirror!

    Bike is a Pole Evolink 140, XL, 52" WB, so it barely fits in the rack. The arms are at like 70d, but so far it has held.

    I'm thinking the combination of a 23lb rack and 31lb bike is not a good one.

    Anyone else experience this?
    This may not be an issue with the 1UP rack but with the hitch receiver. My previous daily driver, a 2007 Impreza, had a Class I hitch and the hitch would flex a lot (should note I do not have a 1UP and this is with a 1.25" Dr Tray). The bike also sat a lot higher than the roofline of the car. The amount of drag caused by the bike would cause the hitch receiver to flex quite a bit at higher speeds and high or gusty wind conditions. I had tried two different hitch receivers, both Class I, and both flexed. Originally started with a Curt hitch which had a flat bar over the exhaust. Switched to a Draw-tite which had a single piece of box tube and while it flexed less, was still very noticable.

    Have since changed daily drivers and now have a 2004 Grand Cherokee with a Class IV hitch and the bike doesn't not stick above the roofline. Everything is rock solid and validates that all of the flexing was coming from the Class I hitch I was using.

  42. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada 29er View Post
    When driving on the highway with a 1.25" Quick Single, the rack starts to vibrate up and down, especially on concrete pavement with expansion joints. On some roads, it seems to hit resonant frequency and just start vibrating like crazy. Pretty disconcerting to see in the rearview mirror!

    Bike is a Pole Evolink 140, XL, 52" WB, so it barely fits in the rack. The arms are at like 70d, but so far it has held.

    I'm thinking the combination of a 23lb rack and 31lb bike is not a good one.

    Anyone else experience this?
    Yes! I have this issue too. My hitch and rack to hitch connection are solid but there seems to be a lot of play in between the black bar and tray position interface. I mostly notice it at around 65mph on concrete highways, adding a second bike (more weight) makes it worse (or feel worse at least). Did you buy yours in the last few months? I'm wondering if they had a batch with the tolerance of the bar/tray position slots a bit off?

  43. #143
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    FWIW Iíve had my 1up on two different vehicles with two different hitches. On one it never loosened in 3 years; on the other it loosens significantly after a few miles of (really) rough roads.

  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by chize View Post
    Yes! I have this issue too. My hitch and rack to hitch connection are solid but there seems to be a lot of play in between the black bar and tray position interface. I mostly notice it at around 65mph on concrete highways, adding a second bike (more weight) makes it worse (or feel worse at least). Did you buy yours in the last few months? I'm wondering if they had a batch with the tolerance of the bar/tray position slots a bit off?
    Not saying this is the issue - but just to comment on the black bar tolerance. I bought my rack many years ago and it seems to have some play there. I don't think it can be really tight - it already binds when you try to release/tilt it as it is. I don't think that play has really ever been a problem, although it always bugged me a bit because the entire system is so "tight" except for that!

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