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  1. #1
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    The Yuba Mundo Thread

    Yuba Mundo is now a fully established cargo bike with many owners worldwide. Let's share our experience from riding her, loading her and upgrading her. Here is mine with a fixie in a tow, with a 1940 vintage S&K velocipede, parked at home next to a coat rack, and a detail of her winter shoe. Mine is stock V3 with a front rack, Avid bb5 upgrade and few small things to make the ride for my kids more comfortable. Post pictures of yours, show us the improvements you made on her...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0118.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0117.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0121.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0100.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0094.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0097.jpg  

    Last edited by fox1965; 11-12-2011 at 01:15 AM.

  2. #2
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    My Yuba Mundo v4.0



    250 pound passenger, dirt road, passenger movement steers bike... not a good experience for me. 140 pound passenger, dirt road, passenger movement effects bike... this is near maximum comfortable live load. 40 pound passenger, basically no effect on handling or me.

    Mundo is used for hauling and recreational riding, 140 pound passenger (grandson) wants one of his own. From a bulk standpoint, two large square bales of hay is a maximum load (for me) and the weight is a 130 ~ 140 pounds.. (This is a maximum load that I can transport a useful distance.)
    Phil
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    Cargo Bike
    Touring / Commuter

  3. #3
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    How do I post Pictures? Whats a url?

  4. #4
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    Love the Yuba in Orange wish the BD came in that color.

  5. #5
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    front rack

    A front rack - a "bread platform" becomes very useful when one carries two kids on the rear rack and needs to pick up a bulky item in the store on the way home. It is easy to attach - just two brackets with 4 screws.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0122.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0131.jpg  


  6. #6
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    Hi Fox, thanks for starting this thread Here are my Mundos, my Orange for daily all around commuter


    Here is my Black Mundo for off-road / single track / fire road use.
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  7. #7
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    stand alone kickstand

    Just a short advice to anybody considering Yuba Mundo. Whatever configuration you get, make sure you buy a stand alone kickstand. It gives the bike incredible stability whenever you need it - be it kids or a load of shopping bags.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-mundo_low-08.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-mundo_low-01.jpg  


  8. #8
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    Very nice front rack...

    Where did you source it and what brand?

  9. #9
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    The rack is Yuba's own, available from their website. I bought it directly with my bicycle. Given a standard head tube, it will fit most mountain bikes with 1 1/8" headset.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-mundo_low-03.jpg  

    Last edited by fox1965; 11-13-2011 at 06:12 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    The rack is Yuba's own, available from their website. I bought it directly with my bicycle. Given a standard head tube, it will fit most mountain bikes with 1 1/8" headset.
    Nice, I really want one of those for my Mundo. After a bit of googling I found out that the rack is made for Yuba by Steco, a Dutch Company.

  11. #11
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    Almost to 10 posts

    After this post I'll be able to post pics!

  12. #12
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    OK Then! Now I can post pics!

    I replaced my 29er w/BOB trailer with a Mundo. The Mundo goes anywhere the old bike did. The Mundo takes "hike-a-bike" to a new level with the rear handlebars to grab hold of. Shown here with about 80lb of camping gear, and a custom four water bottle capacity bar bag system. I run downhill tires with slime because everything has thorns where I live. I did have Hookworms front and back but the wire bead broke on the front tire and it would dismount itself from the rim on occasion, something I'm glad didn't happen while I was bombing down some hill! Anyway I threw a $5 almost bald Kenda Nevegal 2.35 on the front and it grabs the ground a little better than the Hookworm but offers slightly less floatation at low psi. Pretty happy with the combo actualy. I want one of those front racks, just not sure if I want the black one that clamps to head tube or the new one that bolts to the braze-ons. The black one looks more solid to me. I'd also really like to rebuid my bike with a pugsley fork up front and Endomorphs or Black Floyds (fat tires, for those who dont know check out the fatbikes forum) A fat tired Mundo would be the ultimate go anywhere do anything bike. I think you would have to run an internal gear hub because of chain rub. If anyone has done this I'd love to see pics. Also, For anyone who wants to tow a bob trailer, The main tubes at the very back of the bike have an I.D. of 7/8in. so you can put quill stems in them and possibly rig up a spot to put a BOB skewer.
    Last edited by Lone Desert Walker; 11-24-2011 at 06:39 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    A front rack - a "bread platform" becomes very useful when one carries two kids on the rear rack and needs to pick up a bulky item in the store on the way home. It is easy to attach - just two brackets with 4 screws.
    Dude, I would totaly plug those braze-on holes in that cold looking place in the pics. I would take a sharp pencil and jam it into the holes and then snap it off so the tip stays in there and prevents rust. Kidding, I would put some anti seize on some hardware and seal it up. I dont know if the braze-ons are open to the inside of the frame but that would suck if the uncoated inside of the frame started to rust from the inside out. Or someone could have a small flexible tube full of lead bird shot and fill your frame when you were not looking! Nice bike, and totaly dig the front rack.
    Last edited by Lone Desert Walker; 11-23-2011 at 06:31 PM.

  14. #14
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    I, too, ended up with 2.35 downhill tires with slime. For that I played with the chain line a bit. I put a 2 mm washer under the right BB cup and under the freewheel. Still at a small-front large-rear combination, the chain sometimes rubs. I measured other possibilities such as a wider BB spindle or a 6 cog freewheel at the back, but you would not get a chain line for a tire much bigger than 2.3-2,5" at the back. The reason you can get a better chain line with regular bikes is that a tire is right behind the BB, therefore you use the entire space behind it. On Yuba the tire is actually halfway between the BB and the rear axle, therefore on the largest cog on the freewheel you always get the chain closer to the tire. Conclusion: for anything larger, like say 2.5 - 3" you must use an internal gear hub. Then it becomes a matter of strength. I am afraid that 440#-plus-a-rider weight is too much for the hubs on the market. Nu Vinci hub may be capable of that. Tried one on a tandem and works just fine.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0371.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0372.jpg  

    Last edited by fox1965; 11-14-2011 at 10:45 AM.

  15. #15
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    Igh

    I have heard good things about the Sram P5 Cargo hub. Yeah the 2.5 Hookworm hits the chain in the lowest gear but I am in that gear so seldom that for me its not worth worrying about, and the friction/outcome is so minimal that it doesn't matter for me anyway. Whats that thing sticking out in front of your front rotor? Some kind of guard? Has anyone ever unloaded their bike to get through a tuff spot, like a crazy rocky hill and then went back to carry their cargo up to the top? Or maybe across a deep wash? Carrying a Yuba Mundo up hiking trails is realy good exersise and will make you feel "hardcore" or sometimes crazy.

  16. #16
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    It is a Reelight (Shop) - a LED light with a friction free electricity generator. You just attach a pair of magnets on wheel spokes and enough electricity is generated to run a LED light. A small condenser (capacitor) stores small amounts of energy and decharges during stops keeping the light on for several minutes after stopping the bike. Unlike hub dynamo or BB dynamo or tire dynamo there is no contact point. You only have to overcome the force of magnetic field that is negligible compared to air resistance, rolling resistance or bearing friction. No batteries, no upkeep. Always on.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0373.jpg  

    Last edited by fox1965; 11-15-2011 at 01:39 AM.

  17. #17
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    Cool light.

    Thats a pretty cool light. There is a thread in Fat Bikes about fat tired yuba Mundos, heres the link: http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/fat-tire-cargo-bike-552339.html#post8635105

  18. #18
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    Here's my v.1.1 Yuba Mundo 1st generation...paid $300 used from a college Student.

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dsc01281.jpg
    Yeah, well, you know...that's just like your opinion man! -The Dude- 1998
    Trex

  19. #19
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    Just picked up four Yuba's at my shop. We have two Big Dummy's in our fleet currently. Looking forward to doing a full comparo between the two. So far Surly feels faster but flexy. Yuba's an impossible deal to beat. Good to see the cargo stuff catching on.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by swpisstol View Post
    Just picked up four Yuba's at my shop. We have two Big Dummy's in our fleet currently. Looking forward to doing a full comparo between the two. So far Surly feels faster but flexy. Yuba's an impossible deal to beat. Good to see the cargo stuff catching on.
    Mr SW...you're right about the Big Dummy being a faster bike, but for the money you really can't beat the Yuba line of bikes. Plus they are doing great things in Africa with them.... the company gives them away to locals, who use them to start-up a delivery business. The following is some information on one the Africa projects, that's on-going....

    Name:  bspw-006-234x178[1].jpg
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    Mundos going to Tanzania -
    Yeah, well, you know...that's just like your opinion man! -The Dude- 1998
    Trex

  21. #21
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    Wrap around deck

    So check this out. I think I am going to replace my side loader boards with one big wrap around board of a little thicker wood. (I think my current boards are 3/8 inch) Then I can attach one of those fork mounts that people put in the back of their truck to the deck for a towing attachment! Also, if the pugsley 135mm adapter is used I can tow my bob trailer. Plus that extra deck space could be useful. If someone is sitting backwards on the rack they can rest their feet or the board. Like I said though, the board will have to be pretty stout. Also a little caution will have to be exercised so that not too much weight is behind the axle, so loading up the bob trailer with a lot of weight will be ify. Usualy the bob trailer puts its weight right over the axle but now the yuba will be taking some tounge weight. Maybe if my wife does not task me over the holiday break I can sneak out to my garage and work on it. Will post pics when its done. Here are my artistic renderings The last one I took from google images and adjusted, so I give the photographer credit whoever they are:



    Last edited by Lone Desert Walker; 11-23-2011 at 11:34 AM.

  22. #22
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    This is a very interesting idea. Just watch out for the curb! One reason why Yuba is designed this way is, that the separation of side loaders at the back of the bike prevents you from getting stuck when you ride down a step, be it a curb or a natural step on a stony trail. I am really interested in your experience with this design.

  23. #23
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    Oh yeah, and check this out!

    If you are pulling a bike with the new "wrap around deck" and towing attachment, someone could conceivably be pedaling that bike thereby making it a trail-a-bike! Here is another crude drawing. So if you had a ton of cargo and didnt think you could make it up a hill on your route you could just recruit a buddy to be a "pusher." Or how about adding another Yuba on the back! If you add a front rack and load it down with rocks you will be able to put more tounge weight on the deck hitch.

  24. #24
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    Oh,yeah, that could be an issue.......

    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    This is a very interesting idea. Just watch out for the curb! One reason why Yuba is designed this way is, that the separation of side loaders at the back of the bike prevents you from getting stuck when you ride down a step, be it a curb or a natural step on a stony trail. I am really interested in your experience with this design.
    I see your point. I think I try to avoid curbs for the most part but when I do go off one I use my brakes so the rear tire goes off in slow-mo and does not slam down. That is when it would totally get hung up. On the other hand if you let the wrap around rest on the curb it would be parked there solid as heck so you could load the bike up. Might actualy be a good urban bike thing for that very reason. Would probably be just as stable or more stable than the stand alone. It would be a good way to stabilize your bike when kids are climbing up on it.
    Now I'm starting to get board here at work and am doing this with paint:

    I guess you could just cut a slot in a 4x8 sheet of plywood and slap that on too!!!!!!!!!!

  25. #25
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    My latest design

    The "Full" "Wrap Around Deck!!!!!!!!!!" Notice the support wires for the front. This takes things to a whole new level!!!!!!!!!


  26. #26
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    OK, I've got a Wrap Around now !!!!

    I had nothing to do today but eat food, drink coffee, and mess around in my garage so I built the Wrap Around. Its got so much deck space its unbelievable. I just need to get one of those fork mounts for the trail-a-bike. I'm going to drill a few smaller holes for tie downs and I still need to get some longer hardware to bolt it down. Its pretty thick wood and it feels super heavy duty. I cant wait to haul some loads with it.











  27. #27
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    I thought the new racks were suppose to attach to the frame?

  28. #28
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    Wrong rack

    Quote Originally Posted by Fresno View Post
    I thought the new racks were suppose to attach to the frame?
    The new one from Yuba does attach to the frame via the braze-ons in the pic. The black rack above is the one made in denmark available for like $35. the one from yuba is like $125 I think. I think I like the Dannish one myself.

  29. #29
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    The modified wood racks looks great.

  30. #30
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    Merry Xmas!

    This is how I got our tree home!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0426.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0427.jpg  


  31. #31
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    Has anyone tried to put 29" wheels on their Yuba Mundo?
    Has anyone tried one of the Surly's wide tires/wheels?

  32. #32
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    Soon, very soon.

    I am getting closer to getting some fatties under my YuMu. I want to do a 135mm non offset pug fork and run interchangeable front and rear wheels, each built with no dish, 48 spokes and free-free hubs with single speed freewheels. Four gears baby! You have to pull over and flip or swap tires around to change gears!!!!! A four option single speed fat tire YuMu will be an unstoppable expedition machine. I will have to run a chain tensioner though, but they are simple and strong and its not unthinkable to carry a spare on long desert crossings. Strong, durable, simple. There is 4in of clearance in the back so I think endos will run fine. I would like to see some pics but I might just have to measure an endo on a 65mm LM to see what the width is. I might end up running some 44mm snowcats or something to get the tires to clear.

  33. #33
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    How about using a gear hub at the back and having a 135mm non offset in the front? That way you will have whatever amount of gear the rear hub has and no chainline problems plus a spare wheel in the front in case rear hub fails. Just a suggestion. (Cause changing or flipping wheels on loaded YuMu can be a challenge.)

  34. #34
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    Like an alfine 8?

    Yeah, maybe that would be optimal. It would not be as hard core but maybe that is a good thing! I like the way you think. It would be a real pain to switch wheels if I was loaded, especially with my wrap-around deck which is always getting in my way. I guess the only issue is finding the right crank set so that the single chain ring is set far enough out that the chain line is good. looking at the surly website I see that the endos are 3.7 in on 65mm rims so there should not be a problem when running slightly more narrow rims. Theoretically they will run fine on 65mm but will have only 1.5mm of clearance on either side, so if a rim gets out of true or conditions are muddy I think I would want a little more margin than that. I am thinking 30mm to 50mm rims will be better. Of course with a more narrow rim the handling might get squirmy at low psi. I bet the 44mm snowcat rims would do well. And the more narrow the rim the greater the diameter of the tire so there is some playing around to do here. I do not know what the max diameter would be. Just looking at the bike I would say you could squeeze in a 700c wheel with conservatively sized tires.
    Last edited by Lone Desert Walker; 01-06-2012 at 09:39 PM.

  35. #35
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    I thing the best crank is one with a good old square taper bottom bracket. That way you can choose any chainline you want.

  36. #36
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    Hi! I'm new here, just bought my Mundo home a few days ago. Love the thread and the different pics and projects, very inspiring!

    I need a little advice and I'm hoping you folks can give me an idea- Firstly everywhere I go my 20 month old will be in tow. Ive ordered a peanut seat but have to wait until the end of feb for it to be in stock.
    I would like my son to be set back on the platform a little so he's not squished against me and also so I can still swing my leg over the back. This is important because I don't feel very stable putting it over the cross bar without his weight added, so I think once he's loaded it could be potentially dangerous for me to put my leg over (I'm quite short and out of shape). Secondly I'm getting two of the Go-Getters and want to use them too...but I've heard the panniers and the seat are hard to utilize together. So heres my ideas and I would appreciate other Mundoer's views, thank you!

    1- Could I potentially extend the deck out the rear on each side to incorporate the panniers being placed back and extended past the rear a little? I don't intend on carrying huge loads in them or extremely heavy stuff and won't be going off curbs as my little one would get whiplash. I thought I could rig something with thinner PVC pipe and wrap it around from one side to the other. It would be easier if I had the seat and the bags in front of me, but I don't as they are both being ordered.

    2- I considered raising the baby seat so his leg holders do not hang so low on the sides but was concerned raising him wold throw of the center of gravity making it harder to ride.

    I totally realize its a long stretch that anyone here has dealt with this. I also cant upload pics yet so cant really show the complications Im dealing with. At the moment Im trying to rig a trailer up to the bike so I can get cycling, but that defeats the whole object of getting a cargo bike for me. My main buying point with the mundo was a baby seat and panniers- now that is looking a little tough to utilize I'm determined to solve the problem.

  37. #37
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    Long tail bikes are excellent for transporting kids - the long wheel base gives a much more stable ride.

    I don't have any experience of the Mundo, but use an Xtracycle to transport two kids and believe that the experience is the same for both bikes.

    Putting any of the kids behind the center of the rear wheel affects handling negatively. I also found that raising the child seat by only a few centimeters, say an inch, affected the handling. Because of this I have the child seat of the second kid as close to the deck as possible and just above the center of the rear wheel. The older kid sits on her own, between me and the youngest kid.

    The child seat reduces the amount of other stuff you can carry, but it's possible to find room in the panniers infront and behind the child seat. I think that a good alternative is a front rack because it balances the bike.

    Getting on the bike I use the kick stand, raising it only after having mounted the bike. I find getting of the bike is always easier.

    Having said that, half the fun of having a cargo-bike is modifying it to suit you own needs!

  38. #38
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    I've tried an Endo on the rear of my Mundo V3. It fit, but with barely any clearance for mud, wobble, or snow. I actually have a Pugsley fork laying around that was supposed to be used to make the Mundo fat. Just haven't gotten around to it. Too many other projects and trails to ride.
    baker

  39. #39
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    Regarding carrying kids...I've carried my preschooler and elementary kids around a bit on my Mundo. Initially, I thought I'd get a "car seat" type thing for the kids, but I didn't.

    I put a handlebar on the back for the kids to hang onto. If there is a second kid, they have to hang onto the first and/or the rack.

    To keep their feet outta the wheel, I installed a lower mounted rail and put grocery panniers on that. Then the kids put their feet in the grocery panniers. Works fine and I can throw their backpacks, etc in the panniers, too.

    Stability while getting on/off is definitely an issue. I installed a two legged kickstand, which helped immensely. I still have to be careful, especially on dirt roads (which is pretty much the only place I ride the Mundo). Also, the leg swing to mount/dismount is an issue. After nearly taking out the kids a couple times, I started mounting differently (lifting the leg over the top-tube).

    As my kids got bigger, I actually installed an electric motor front wheel and a couple RC car batteries to drive it. Pretty fun and I can revert to pedal power very easily.

    Here are a couple links that show my Mundo:

    Monumentally Afflicted: Yuba Mundo...Schwing!!!

    Monumentally Afflicted: Yuba Mundo V3 Upgrades

    The Electric Pig
    baker

  40. #40
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    thanks folks for the ideas- if you go to my blog spot and look on the right there is a link for my DIY kids seat.


    You Ain't Got Jack

    Last edited by YouAin'tGotJack; 01-28-2012 at 10:13 AM.

  41. #41
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    heres pics- slowly figuring this site out
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-3rd-trip-002.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-3rd-trip-007.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-first-trip-diy-bike-seat.jpg  


  42. #42
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    The seat is set back just far enough that I can swing my leg on and off which is SO much easier than trying to step over the bar for a shorty like me. I have a pair of wheel skirts that I need to attach to, probably get to it today.

    I'm also waiting for a double kickstand- does anyone here know if I can use the double kickstand that E-bikes sells rather than the Yuba one and if they are of similar construction. I hate to have to wait until March for the Yuba stand.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    Yeah, maybe that would be optimal. It would not be as hard core but maybe that is a good thing! I like the way you think. It would be a real pain to switch wheels if I was loaded, especially with my wrap-around deck which is always getting in my way. I guess the only issue is finding the right crank set so that the single chain ring is set far enough out that the chain line is good. looking at the surly website I see that the endos are 3.7 in on 65mm rims so there should not be a problem when running slightly more narrow rims. Theoretically they will run fine on 65mm but will have only 1.5mm of clearance on either side, so if a rim gets out of true or conditions are muddy I think I would want a little more margin than that. I am thinking 30mm to 50mm rims will be better. Of course with a more narrow rim the handling might get squirmy at low psi. I bet the 44mm snowcat rims would do well. And the more narrow the rim the greater the diameter of the tire so there is some playing around to do here. I do not know what the max diameter would be. Just looking at the bike I would say you could squeeze in a 700c wheel with conservatively sized tires.
    If that frame has 4 inches of clearance in the back it is your civil duty to the world of bike nerds to make it an Alfine Fattie. SS would just be a dumb idea on that machine.
    I just built up a front wheel with a Echo Trials 44mm rim from webcyclery and an Endo measures to either 84 or 86 mm (can't remember). For a little while I had the Endo on a 29 mm rim.... that was a little squirrely and lost a lot of tire volume - not all the tread would hit the ground even at low pressure.
    I'd say go for the 44mm rims and don't look back. Mud clearance is a good thing.



  44. #44
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    I looked at those awhile back. I'm very suspicious of the 14mm rear axle. Suspicious that its a p.o.s. that will be hard to replace. 14mm to 10mm converters are an ok workaround, but I still would prefer a frame designed to take conventional quick-release 10mm axles.

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    Dude,

    Half the bmx bikes out there have 14mm axles, they are just thicker axles, whats to be suspicious about? The 14mm dropouts are more universal and adaptable than any other dropouts. It is not a problem to run any axle in the mundo frame.

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    The Mundo has a 400 lb cargo rating... PLUS the rider! You don't get there with a hollow 10 mm axle. We bent the Phil Wood axle on our tandem, no luggage, my stoker is fairly petit, and yells at me if I do anything that SHOULD bend an axle. That 14mm hunk of solid steel is very reassuring when the Mundo is loaded up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    Half the bmx bikes out there have 14mm axles, they are just thicker axles, whats to be suspicious about? The 14mm dropouts are more universal and adaptable than any other dropouts. It is not a problem to run any axle in the mundo frame.
    Quote Originally Posted by gumby_kevbo View Post
    The Mundo has a 400 lb cargo rating... PLUS the rider! You don't get there with a hollow 10 mm axle. We bent the Phil Wood axle on our tandem, no luggage, my stoker is fairly petit, and yells at me if I do anything that SHOULD bend an axle. That 14mm hunk of solid steel is very reassuring when the Mundo is loaded up.
    a lot of bmx folks have moved away from 14mm axles, but yes they still are used. bmx rear uses 110mm o.l.d. hubs, and you wouldn't want to lace that to a 26" rim... too narrow of flange spacing, not to mention unavailability of hub with 8sp freehub body.

    Many 14mm axles use low quality steel. a 10mm axle with a nice heat treatment and the right material can be far stronger than a crappy 14mm axle. I've seen this over and over again on bmx bikes. My perspective comes from 10 years of serious riding semi-professionally (getting payed, but not living off it) and working at a dozen bike shops (I moved around a lot while going to college).

    Most people are running quick release on their big dummies and tandems without any problems. I've done some tandem touring with quick release front and rear with no problems.

    semi-proprietary components are a huge pain in the ass. If its not broke, don't create a new part that breaks it!

    axle converters get smooshed and gummed up over time. Say you buy a new hub after the cheapo one it (I'm assuming its low quality since this is a relatively cheap bike and we are speaking of the bicycle industry) comes with fails after only a few thousand miles. Perhaps you buy a nice solid axle to replace the qr axle. You install it with some 14mm to 10mm adapter and ride for awhile. Then one day you want to overhaul the hub or tighten a loose cone or locknut, but that damn adapters bunged up the threads on the axle and you can't get the locknut and cones off without stripping them or trying to find a die to clean up the threads. This kind of ordeal has plagued bmx riders for years. Why bring their problems to the bigger wheeled bicycle world?


    edit: and i also wanted to mention that one of the great things about 10mm dropouts is that you can file them to accommodate a 14mm axle without much trouble (assuming the dropout design leaves enough material remaining). adding material to go the other way, now that's tricky.

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    Good points here.

    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    a lot of bmx folks have moved away from 14mm axles, but yes they still are used. bmx rear uses 110mm o.l.d. hubs, and you wouldn't want to lace that to a 26" rim... too narrow of flange spacing, not to mention unavailability of hub with 8sp freehub body.

    Many 14mm axles use low quality steel. a 10mm axle with a nice heat treatment and the right material can be far stronger than a crappy 14mm axle. I've seen this over and over again on bmx bikes. My perspective comes from 10 years of serious riding semi-professionally (getting payed, but not living off it) and working at a dozen bike shops (I moved around a lot while going to college).

    Most people are running quick release on their big dummies and tandems without any problems. I've done some tandem touring with quick release front and rear with no problems.

    semi-proprietary components are a huge pain in the ass. If its not broke, don't create a new part that breaks it!

    axle converters get smooshed and gummed up over time. Say you buy a new hub after the cheapo one it (I'm assuming its low quality since this is a relatively cheap bike and we are speaking of the bicycle industry) comes with fails after only a few thousand miles. Perhaps you buy a nice solid axle to replace the qr axle. You install it with some 14mm to 10mm adapter and ride for awhile. Then one day you want to overhaul the hub or tighten a loose cone or locknut, but that damn adapters bunged up the threads on the axle and you can't get the locknut and cones off without stripping them or trying to find a die to clean up the threads. This kind of ordeal has plagued bmx riders for years. Why bring their problems to the bigger wheeled bicycle world?


    edit: and i also wanted to mention that one of the great things about 10mm dropouts is that you can file them to accommodate a 14mm axle without much trouble (assuming the dropout design leaves enough material remaining). adding material to go the other way, now that's tricky.
    I never thought about steel quality, I hope the yuba axles are quality. If they are not they could be replaced with quality ones, and quality 14mm axles will be stronger than quality 10mm axles. I think all those people running hollow 10mm axles on their cargo bikes are not loading them up like you could with a solid high quality 14mm axle. The fact is thicker steel (steel quality being equal) is stronger, so if you want a serious cargo bike 14mm might be the way to go. If you never plan to use it to its full capacity go with whatever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Desert Walker View Post
    I never thought about steel quality, I hope the yuba axles are quality. If they are not they could be replaced with quality ones, and quality 14mm axles will be stronger than quality 10mm axles. I think all those people running hollow 10mm axles on their cargo bikes are not loading them up like you could with a solid high quality 14mm axle. The fact is thicker steel (steel quality being equal) is stronger, so if you want a serious cargo bike 14mm might be the way to go. If you never plan to use it to its full capacity go with whatever.
    All this is true.

    However it may be very difficult to find another axle(of higher quality), let alone a replacement axle. I've seen 12 year old kids bend solid 14mm axles, and I've put some 10mm axle wheels through the ringer with no bending.

    If the hub is unsealed, there will be no problem replacing the axle, but good luck finding a nice one. Suzue replacement axles are an option, but they're probably rare now.

    If the hub is sealed, then you have to find an axle with shoulders that have the same spacing. I can pretty much guarantee you that you will not find this, as no bmx hub will have shoulders for the inner race of the bearings in a comparable location due to narrower old.

    So the idea is fantastic in the abstract, but the real-life trade-offs make it highly questionable.

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    This is a revelation!

    We now have a picture of a Yuba with Endomorphs on it, yes thats right, photographic evidence of a fat yuba!!!!!!!!!! Fat rims

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