Page 7 of 12 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 175 of 281
  1. #151
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    18
    Just picked up our Mundo on Sunday and have put it right to work. Yesterday my wife carted the kids around town on it - gym, library, bank, swimming pool - and they all had tons of fun while I was at work. I was jealous, so I got up early this morning,I strapped a milk crate full of tools to the side and a weedwacker on the deck and headed out to cut back some of the overgrowth on our local single-track. It handles single track well and the low gears make it possible to cruise up even the steep climbs. The Mundo's one-size-fits-most makes if perfect for sharing. I don't love re-installing the peanut shell, but I figured out how to do it in under 10 minutes and still use all 16 of those little plastic pieces.

  2. #152
    I am Bob
    Reputation: chongoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,810

    big orange on big orange

    towing the XC bike to the shop for shock service.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-tow-bike.jpg  


  3. #153
    Disabled Vet
    Reputation: longhaultrucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,021
    That's just too cool,my friend! I always dig seeing bikes hauling bikes
    '11 Origin 8 700CX
    '14 Surly Troll

  4. #154
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    919
    I just built up my yuba mundo v4 frame. It was a long build, but I'm thrilled with the result.

    The only thing that isn't fully kosher is that I could not find a 31.8mm seatpost. 31.6's abound, but out of 3 main suppliers our shop uses (hawley, j&b, qbp) only j&b and qbp had a post, and each had precisely 1. of course 27.2 to 31.8 shims are available, but I easily bend cheap 27.2 posts and a thomson is not in the budget at the moment. My main complaint with the design of the frame is that they chose such a strange seatpost size, I presume it is inspired by the 31.8 oversize handlebar standard. Future iterations, imho, should be 31.6 or some similarly near standard size (but no 27.2, b/c most seatposts bend easily in this diameter if you're near 200lbs (surly, you should take this advice too!)

    The bb is supposed to be 68mm, and my calipers indicate its about .5mm too narrow. But the threads were clear of paint, so no big deal.

    The side bars that bolt to the bottom of the frame squish the tube that the bolts go through, leading to dimples, at least they do if you put a reasonable amount of torque on the m5 bolts. its not a big deal, but less than ideal.

    too few m6 bolts(2 out of 4) were supplied to clamp the side bars at the rear of the frame. another tiny gripe.

    instructions are terrible, but not particularly necessary. Just a few pictures that don't even indicate what you're supposed to notice.

    the kickstand is awesome, but sharp on the bottom, and being dumb, I already scratched our bamboo floor. It was great that the bike stood upright while I attached my touring bike in towing mode. And speaking of towing, it took about 30 seconds to securely attach my touring bike(the front wheel stuck in the side loaders and a long bungee attaching the headtube area of the touring bike to the yuba. Its almost secure enough to be a 3wheel tandem ! (but not when attached with just a bungee)

    2.5 hookworms fit the fork with about 3/8" clearance on each side. cannot get wheel from between brake pads b/c of tire interference w/o letting air out of tire, I will probably install my big dummy fork that's laying around at some point.

    I'm using rim brakes and a rear drum brake, so I can't comment on the unusual disc brake adapter setup. Still need to hook up the drum brake as well.

    My inertia designs panniers hooked up to the frame perfectly. I just put a bungee cord horizontal to catch the hook that usually attaches to the bottom of your rack to keep the bags attached securely. Since I didn't buy any of the prefab cargo solutions, this was a nice surprise.

    My rear wheel is a 145mm o.l.d. tandem wheel. It would not fit in between the dropouts. I put the frame upside down with the sidebars removed, then I put my feet on the far side of the frame as far back as possible, grabbed the other frame, and pulled as hard as possible. I thought that it surely would not be possible to open up the rear end of a mundo with 1 man's strength alone, but after about ten minutes of several intense efforts I won! If I go back to 135mm hub, I'll just use the qr to pull the dropouts together or put the axle converter on the inside of the dropout rather than the outside.

    Using a 10mm qr axles with a bmx 3/8" to 14mm axle adapter required a bit of dremmeling, as 10mm qr is larger than the inner diameter of the converter (mfg by profile), but only a thin layer needed removing. Because the yuba has a diagonal dropout, I had to tighten the qr as much as possible to keep it from slipping. Despite doing this, with a heavy enough load and in the granny gear, I'm confident the axle will slip. Perhaps the only solution is to replace the qr axle with a solid one, but I don't have the time at the moment, and the super tight qr is sufficient for 95% of conceivable loads.
    Last edited by PretendGentleman; 07-25-2012 at 12:16 PM.

  5. #155
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    39

    1.25 inch stoker stem

    My Yuba V4 frameset is on it's way and I'm looking forward to building it up with wheels and transmission from my xtracycle.

    One issue I've realised is that the seat post is 1.25 inch size (I have a Yuba one coming) and I'm having trouble sourcing a 1.25 inch stem to use as a stoker stem. I could get the Yuba stoker kit of course, but was hoping to get a stem cheaper. An alternative would be to use a more common 1.5 inch stem and a 1.5 inch to 1.25 inch reducer.

    But neither the 1.25 inch stems or 1.5 to 1.25 reducers seem easy to come by. Does anyone have any pointers?

  6. #156
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GuruAtma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,455
    I looked for a long time to find a stem that would fit on the fat Yuba seat post. I ended up just getting the Yuba one. The closest I could come was clamping on some aero bar extensions I had laying around, but they were kind of awkward.

    Now I'm looking for a longer back sweep handle bar so that 2 kids on the back can both hold on to it.
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  7. #157
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    39
    I've given up looking and done the same

  8. #158
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    919
    My plan to make a "stoker" handlebar is to get a 0 rise stem that takes 31.8 bars, which will clamp to the seatpost. Then I'll find an old used 28.6mm seatpost and cut it down to a reasonable width and remove the head and use it as a large diameter handlebar. presumably with a little elbow grease a rubber grip will go on, but if not, bartape will be easy. Hopefully I can find a nice symmetrical stem so everything is good and centered.

  9. #159
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    919
    If I could only find my bluetooth dongle, I'd post pictures.

    Usually I do a 6.30 group ride on tuesdays. Because I carry a laptop and a bunch of other crap to work with me, I usually ride my commuter to work and then leave early so I have time to ride home, get my mtb and stuff and then ride back to the shop (which is close to my work). I waste about an hour just going back and forth, meaning I never get as much done on a Tuesday as I should.

    But this tuesday, I put my front wheel in the sideloader of my yuba, wrapped a couple of bungie cords around, threw my camelbak and shoes on top of the rack, 2 panniers with laptop, rainjacket, tools, etc on the other side. I'm sure it looks insane to people driving by, but I'm stoked on saving an hour and I'm sure the guys at the shop will get a kick out of this contraption. Another benefit is that Instead of 7 miles of asphalt riding on my 29er back and forth from home to group ride (unnecessary wear on expensive tubeless tires), my back tire is barely loaded cruising the same distance. I can barely tell that I'm carrying more weight.

    This is a revolution for me!

    and like chongoman, my bikes match nicely, black on black.

  10. #160
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    39

    V4 forks

    So I've just received my V4 frameset and am looking forward to building it up and getting on the road. On unpacking the frame looks much better than the V1 I had when they first came out. Whilst I know blade shaped forks seem to be in vogue it doesn't have the same sense of sturdiness as the rest of the package. It's an aheadset fork which means it will be compatible with stems and bars I already have. Then I came across this;
    Endless-sphere.com • View topic - Warning to Yuba Owners - don't use large rotors

    Now straight away I notice that the failure was with a 203mm rotor and Yuba recommend a 160mm max, but all the same I now have that nagging doubt.

    At the moment I'm considering partnering the frame with a Big Dummy fork for peace of mind. I'd be interested to hear from the voices of experience here.

  11. #161
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    39
    Looking into a BD fork as a possibility reveals this from Surly;

    .... It should be noted that using the front brake only could cause the fork or frame to fail under heavy load conditions. Use both brakes and keep your speed under control .....

    So this could be more a general issue with cargo bikes than specific to Yuba. I don't know about all the physics stuff but I imagine that not only does the extra weight often carried on cargo bikes mean the brakes have to work harder and in turn potentially stress the fork / frame more, but also the extra weight means the brakes can work a lot harder because it enables the tyres to grip for longer before skidding.

    I guess the front end always has to work harder than usual, regardless of cargo carried, as the rider weight is more loaded on the front wheel than on a standard bike.

    Do V brakes give forks an easier time as they operate equally on both sides?

  12. #162
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    26
    On front vs. rear braking and cargo bikes:

    A normal bike on pavement will lift the rear wheel before the front wheel skids. That means you can stop in the shortest possible distance ising only the fromt brake. Long wheelbase bikes like cargo bikes and tandems can/will skid the front tire before the rear lifts. This means that the rear brake on such a bike is far more important. On a long wheelbase you need both brakes for maximum stopping power. Using only the front brake to make a hard stop risks skidding the front wheel which is almost certain to cause a crash.

  13. #163
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by andyh2 View Post
    So I've just received my V4 frameset and am looking forward to building it up and getting on the road. On unpacking the frame looks much better than the V1 I had when they first came out. Whilst I know blade shaped forks seem to be in vogue it doesn't have the same sense of sturdiness as the rest of the package. It's an aheadset fork which means it will be compatible with stems and bars I already have. Then I came across this;
    Endless-sphere.com • View topic - Warning to Yuba Owners - don't use large rotors

    Now straight away I notice that the failure was with a 203mm rotor and Yuba recommend a 160mm max, but all the same I now have that nagging doubt.

    At the moment I'm considering partnering the frame with a Big Dummy fork for peace of mind. I'd be interested to hear from the voices of experience here.
    I have a BD fork laying around, but seeing this, I think I'll replace my yuba fork soon. The forks do look a notch below the rest of the bike!

  14. #164
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    39
    One thing I noticed on my Xtracycle is that when riding with 2 x 35kg passengers in our hilly town I regularly have the brakes on fairly constantly to keep the speed down to what feels safe enough in traffic with side junctions. Since I'm getting a new rear wheel built for my Yuba I think I'll use your approach Pretend Gentleman and have V brakes front and rear with a rear Sturmey XRD-C drum brake that I can use with an old style thumbie as a drag brake. The XRD-C is 135mm so I shouldn't need any super human rear dropout widening

    My frame (inc side loaders), forks, headset, seat clamp weigh in at a shade under 25lb. A standard steel frame, fork and rack would be around 10lb so a 15lb weight 'penalty' seems pretty good for all that extra utility.

  15. #165
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    919
    My second attempt to carry pallets. This time it was much easier to get them on and off b/c I brought plenty of tie down straps rather than a bunch of bungie cords.


    Here you can see that I've put a big dummy fork on mine since I had it laying around. I think it looks a good deal better than the stock fork.



    This sort of happened on accident, (flat items on the right side tend to interfere with the dereailleur as it tries to move outwards to drop the chain to the smallest cog) as the right pallet leaned in to meet the left one, allowing a full range of shifting.




    the kickstand is doing a great job of holding these pallets up as long as I'm on nearly flat ground from side to side and mostly flat ground from front to back.


    it looks naked now


    my two inertia designs dryback panniers. The hooks fit right over the rack and I use horizontal tightly stretched bungie cords to catch the bottom hook.


    I found this bag for $20 at harbor freight. wheels help keep it on the bike, interferes with derailleur if on the right side.

    Last edited by PretendGentleman; 08-05-2012 at 04:52 PM.

  16. #166
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    39
    PG, the BD fork is a little longer. about 1cm I think, than stock, did you notice any handling difference or does it feel fine?

    Bike looking good by the way

  17. #167
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by andyh2 View Post
    PG, the BD fork is a little longer. about 1cm I think, than stock, did you notice any handling difference or does it feel fine?

    Bike looking good by the way
    If anything the fork feels like it turns a bit quicker. The difference is definitely subtle. The steerer tube on the yuba is an inch or two longer, so my stem ended up dropping some at the same time as my fork changed.

    Thanks! I just need to get around to hooking up the rear drum brake. This bike has been a blast so far. I'm using it as my daily commuter so I'm ready to carry whatever I find along the way.

    There have been a few surprises. I initially was thinking, " 440lbs weight limit, I can think of a gazillion things I want to move that weigh less than that", and then I've slowly come to realize that many things, like an 8' piece of lumber, don't fit on the back of the bike very easily if at all. It would seem that more cumbersome items need a big trailer.

  18. #168
    mtbr member
    Reputation: motorman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    552
    For those of you running fat frank or hookworms, how much room is there between the tyre & chain in 1st gear? Is there any room for a bigger tyre, such as a 26x3"? with the stock gearing?
    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  19. #169
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    8
    Hello!

    I bought a Yuba Mundo in June 2012. I love it so far! My kids love it to

    At first I used a trekkinghandlebar but it was a bit to narrow so I changed it for my old Kona Ute handlebar.



    Now my bike looks like this:

    I've used plasticairhose to protect the paint.

    The Avid BB7 (200mm front, 180mm rear) works perfect!

    My kids rides in their seats. I can use one or two seats. They are fast to mount on the bike.


    After reading in a forum about borken forks I was worried my fork would snap so I've bought a Surly Big Dummy fork instead. As you can se in the picture it locks much sturdier than the yuba. The yuba looks very cheap and I had to bend it a bit to make the wheel and brake fit when it was new. The yuba fork bends flexes when braking and I'm scared every time I have to brake hard. I use the rear brake most of the time. With the extra weight in the rear it's quite effecitve.

  20. #170
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    919
    whoa, surly must have really lengthened the big dummy fork steerer tube! Mine was like 2" shorter than the yuba fork, but my dummy fork is also ~6 yrs old.

    I didn't get what you meant about using hose to protect paint. Can you explain?

  21. #171
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    8
    I use it on the rack to prevent the childseats rubbing the paint. I cut it open and put it on the rack with zipties. Look at the picture below. (excuse my bad English. my language is Swedish)


  22. #172
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GuruAtma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,455
    I've noticed my Yuba fork flexing like crazy. I take 2 kids to school every day on it, so I think i'll get a Big Dummy fork as well.
    Question: The Yuba fork seems to sweep forward a bit. Does the Big Dummy fork do that too? If not, does it affect handling a lot? Or is the BD fork a bit longer so that it makes up for the lack of sweep?
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  23. #173
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    39
    I did a bit of measuring with my Yuba fork and reckon the rake is 59mm. The BD fork axle to crown is 425mm and Yuba 418mm so the it's only just over 1/4" longer, but the rake is 43mm compared to the yuba's 59mm.

    Plugging the numbers into a trail calculator the std yuba would be 54mm trail and with a BD fork 73mm. Which seems like quite a difference. And would imply it would be less stable. I wonder if this would be exacerbated with more of a front load?

    On the other hand Yuba + BD fork gives the same trail measurement as my rigid MTB and perhaps the long wheelbase provides plenty of stability anyway.

    Those running the BD fork seem happy with it, which is the important measure I guess.

    It is a shame as the frame really looks like it's up to the job, whereas the fork just doesn't. Kicking myself for not jumping at an unused BD fork that came up on ebay recently!

  24. #174
    mtbr member
    Reputation: motorman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    552
    How long is that BD fork steerer? I have an uncut pugsley fork waiting to be fitted to my yuba when it arrives, but it looks a lot shorter than that?

    Edit - Answered !
    Drink coffee....ride bikes....eat cake
    http://morayfatbike.blogspot.com

  25. #175
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GuruAtma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,455
    Quote Originally Posted by motorman View Post
    How long is that BD fork steerer? I have an uncut pugsley fork waiting to be fitted to my yuba when it arrives, but it looks a lot shorter than that?

    Edit - Answered !
    So are the steerers about the same?
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

Page 7 of 12 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Big Dummy or Yuba Mundo for suburbia
    By jason300b in forum Cargo Bikes
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-06-2012, 07:37 PM
  2. Yuba Mundo V.4 Frameset on sale!
    By Solrider in forum Cargo Bikes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-07-2011, 10:24 AM
  3. entrando al mundo 29
    By brunomu in forum Mexico
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-09-2011, 01:59 AM
  4. Paid Spam: Yuba Mundo V3.3 Cargo Bike - latest version
    By Fatboy Joe in forum Cargo Bikes
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-14-2011, 12:28 AM
  5. Cargo Bike Yuba Mundo
    By Drblack in forum Cargo Bikes
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-31-2010, 12:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •