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  1. #201
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    Depending on which generation Mundo you have, you may also need a new headset. At the back you may have a hard time shifting to low gears, so a longer bottom bracket axle or a different rear hub may be needed (take a look at my Yuba at the beginning of this thread.

  2. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    Depending on which generation Mundo you have, you may also need a new headset. At the back you may have a hard time shifting to low gears, so a longer bottom bracket axle or a different rear hub may be needed (take a look at my Yuba at the beginning of this thread.
    It is a version 4 (2011). Any difference between the Moonlander or Necro forks? I think they are the same except for paint.

  3. #203
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    You have to look at these fork characteristics - axle to crown distance, width, offset, trail (trail is a result of fork-frame-wheel combo, so you will not find it). Both Yuba and Surly should be able to tell you other data. Then choose an offset and the axle-crown distance closest to your current fork. My old version Surly fork came pretty close. It put the bottom bracket a bit higher and gave my Yuba a livelier feel, which I find as a good think in the end. Good luck and post the picture after you are done.

  4. #204
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    Fresno check out Motormans Fat Mundo thread for some more detail of his build.

    Some fork comparison numbers;
    Yuba standard v4 fork axle to crown 418mm, fork offset 59mm
    Surly Pugs fork axle to crown 447mm, fork offset 43mm
    Surly Big Dummy fork axle to crown 425mm, fork offset 43mm

    I imagine that the higher than usual fork offset if the Yuba is designed to give a more stable ride. I don't know, but that it might be more important if using the big front rack loaded?

    When I put the numbers through a trail calculator putting a BD fork on gave the same trail numbers as my rigid MTB, which is probably why folk with that set up report it feeling more nimble. I guess it also makes it feel more normal.

    The Clown shoe rim and Moonlander fork are probably overkill unless you have a specific purpose.

    If you go with the Pugs 100mm fork you could use the standard rim or perhaps a standard front wheel with a 42mm - 50mm.

    It's worth considering the effect of much larger tyres and longer forks raising the BB. Good for off road clearance, but harder to control the loaded weight when starting and stopping

  5. #205
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    My Yuba has two months and around 800 km. It serves well and during its operation I am identifying things to improve. One of them is the gear ratio. On my way to the downtown there is a long, moderate descent. On my road bike I use to go there around 60 kmph. Yuba has a 24/34/44 chainwheel and that in the combination with the 14 rings on the smallest freewheel means, that the bike is slower in the traffic. (I realized this when I tried to overtake the bus leaving the stop: we were going side by side around 200 meters and I was not able to go before it, pedaling as fast as I could. )

    A solution could be changing the chainwheel to something like 22/39/53. I don't need small differences in the possible gear ratios but I still need light ratio to go uphill with a loaded bike.

    Do you have some experiences in changing the front chainwheel? Should I expect any complications?

    Thanks

  6. #206
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    I would not recommend switching to a much bigger chainring. Since Mundo's wheels are further apart than on a regular bicycle, it's bottom bracket (and the largest chainwheel) is relatively lower to the ground when riding over bumps on a changing slope off-road. Would a 13 tooth freewheel fit over the rear axel? Or next time ride behind the bus and overtake it while it stops to un/load passengers:-)

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    My Yuba has two months and around 800 km. It serves well and during its operation I am identifying things to improve. One of them is the gear ratio. On my way to the downtown there is a long, moderate descent. On my road bike I use to go there around 60 kmph. Yuba has a 24/34/44 chainwheel and that in the combination with the 14 rings on the smallest freewheel means, that the bike is slower in the traffic. (I realized this when I tried to overtake the bus leaving the stop: we were going side by side around 200 meters and I was not able to go before it, pedaling as fast as I could. )

    A solution could be changing the chainwheel to something like 22/39/53. I don't need small differences in the possible gear ratios but I still need light ratio to go uphill with a loaded bike.

    Do you have some experiences in changing the front chainwheel? Should I expect any complications?

    Thanks
    I'm not sure what kind of cranks the stock mundo has. If the rings are removable, you could get a 48t chainring and maybe a 50t if you're lucky, assuming 4 bolt 104mm bcd (bolt circle diameter).

    The more pricey but easy option would be to get a road triple crank and chainring setup, such as a sora or tiagra one. (it's 9sp but that won't matter, worst case scenario, you might need to upgrade the chain too, I don't know what the stock yuba has and can't tell from pics on their site, 8sp chain will work great as upgrade)
    I google it and found one for <90, but you can probably do a bit better looking around
    Shimano 2011 Sora 9-Speed Triple Road Bicycle Crank Set - FC-3403 : Browse All Products
    (edit: just noticed this one doesn't include the necessary hollowtech II bottom bracket, look around as I think you can find a road triple for around this price that does include bb.)
    Sugino makes a nice forged square taper crankset that *might* work with your current bb, but this depends on its length and once again, can't tell this spec from the yuba site (though no manufacturer gives this detail)
    here's the sugino: Sugino XD600 26/36/46 Triple Crankset in Tree Fort Bikes Cranks (cat119)
    and you might need to buy a new bb too, but you won't know until you measure the old one (spindle length[~100-125mm range]) and compare it to what the sugino requires.
    Once you have 5 bolt 110mm bcd you have a lot more chainring options. I have a cheapo steel 50t 5 bolt ring I got for nearly free from a shop that does used bikes.

    The complication is that your front derailleur should roughly match the curvature of the big ring for good shifting. If you go substantially bigger than what you have now, your derailleur might be sub optimal, but you can probably live with that. You just have slide it up the seat-tube until the derailleur cage clears the big ring.

    I'm not sure about how small of a gear you can have on the rear wheel, as this is an unusual wheel, but you do have the option of putting a regular cassette w/ 3/8" to 14mm axle adaptors and then you can go up to 10sp and down to 11t, though changing the number of gears would require new chain, shifters, etc. Replacing your cranks would be the cheap place to start.

    Regarding Fox's comment, yes high bottoming will be more problematic in off-road situations, so this could be applicable, depending on where you take the bike.

  8. #208
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    Xmas Tree

    Xmas Tree
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0801.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0800.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0799.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0803.jpg  

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0802.jpg  


  9. #209
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    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    Xmas Tree
    Nice. Unfortunately, we have an artificial christmas tree, so I can't make this type of transport with my Yuba. But maybe someone from my relatives will need a tree, I must ask them, if they need a transporter

  10. #210
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    Does anybody have a child seat for larger child (5+ yrs) mounted on a Yuba? I hope my daughter will ride her own bike as much as she can, but for longer rides or for travelling through the dense traffic and with no child-safe bike routes the seat is necessary.

    The only applicable product that I have found so far is the GMG Classic 911 (sorry, I can't post link here , you must substitute dot for .: www dot rijwielreus dot nl/yepp/1351-kinderzitje-achter-911-met-voetsteun-8715362002075.html). I am not sure about the mounting. Can be the seat mounted to the rear carrier as is delivered, or some special adapter/DIY work is needed?

    Is the width between the seat's leg supporters sufficient for Yuba?
    Sometimes it can be useful to have only the child seat without the leg supporters (for a big box or Go-getters mounting) - is it possible to remove the supporters? I have found a picture (again, I can't attach the picture www dot senselife dot co dot uk/GMG/GMG_911_underside_2500.jpg), it looks like the horizontal part of the supporters can be unscrewed, but what about the vertical one?

    Perhaps there is another child seat like GMG Classic 911, you can recommend it to me

  11. #211
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    Nice. Unfortunately, we have an artificial christmas tree, so I can't make this type of transport with my Yuba. But maybe someone from my relatives will need a tree, I must ask them, if they need a transporter
    There's absolutely no reason you can't give your artificial tree a ride around the block!

  12. #212
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    The Bionx was fun for awhile but I ended up selling it. Having the drive wheel up front meant my bike was actually two wheel drive. I am going to have some 65mm rims on this bad boy soon.

  13. #213
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    heavy bulky load

    Just brought home two shoe cabinets, about under hundred pounds each on the loaders. The bike handled just fine. Cabinets seemed to be easier to carry when tied on the bike in the tall position and forward rather than low and partly beyond the rear axle. Looks like getting the center of gravity higher is less of a problem than moving it backwards. Happy new year!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0806.jpg  


  14. #214
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    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    Looks like getting the center of gravity higher is less of a problem than moving it backwards.
    Good to know, I am planning to buy new kitchen cabinets. But in my case, the taller one will be over 2 m high, so placing it vertically will be a real challenge

  15. #215
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    I tried to load them both vertically and horizontally. Horizontally placed boxes sucked, there was too much load behind the rear axle. Vertically placed boxes were surprisingly easy to carry. But those boxes were only 4ft tall. Good luck and post a picture!

  16. #216
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    Yes, placing something behind the rear axle is really tricky, when my wife and daughter sit on the rear carrier (without child seat), the daughter sits in front and it can be seen on the bike maneuverability. Inverse order of passangers is impossible, my wife serves also as a backrest for the child

  17. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    Yes, placing something behind the rear axle is really tricky, when my wife and daughter sit on the rear carrier (without child seat), the daughter sits in front and it can be seen on the bike maneuverability. Inverse order of passangers is impossible, my wife serves also as a backrest for the child
    This is why having a solid front basket/rack can be especially helpful. When weight is unavoidable behind the axle, you can make the bike a lot safer by adding weight to the front wheel so you still have proper handling and good steering traction.

    I just use a cheapo rack that mounts to the fork, but hope to eventually get the yuba frame mounted one or find someone to fabricate one for me. Even with only modest weight behind the axle, I am more confident with some weight up front balancing things out. for example, when I put 40lbs of groceries evenly distributed across the rear rack, I like to strap a 12 pack to the front rack. It shows the world my fine choice in beer as well.

  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    This is why having a solid front basket/rack can be especially helpful. When weight is unavoidable behind the axle, you can make the bike a lot safer by adding weight to the front wheel so you still have proper handling and good steering traction.

    I just use a cheapo rack that mounts to the fork, but hope to eventually get the yuba frame mounted one or find someone to fabricate one for me. Even with only modest weight behind the axle, I am more confident with some weight up front balancing things out. for example, when I put 40lbs of groceries evenly distributed across the rear rack, I like to strap a 12 pack to the front rack. It shows the world my fine choice in beer as well.
    My last commuting bike was a 20 years old one additionally equipped with a front rack ("L" shaped Steco with 25 kgs load capacity) and it was really addictive to have a large storing area at hand. I am missing this on my Mundo. In fact, I also bought a front carrier with my Mundo (mounted to the frame but not the bread basket), but it is still not on the bike. The main reason is limited parking space in my flat, the bike is parked between doors and a wardrobe with the front wheel turned right

    On the previous bike I used to ride with a "front loaded" bike, I have two boxes, which can be alternitively attached to the carrier. The bigger one has dimensions 60x40x30 cm and when fully loaded, the bike had a center of gravity on the handlebars. So it was another extreme

  19. #219
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    how to park your Yuba Mundo

    Where space is limited, Yuba Mundo should be parked on its tail. If you are not confident about its stability, bungee-cord it to a screw in the wall or furniture.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-img_0094.jpg  


  20. #220
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    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    . Cabinets seemed to be easier to carry when tied on the bike in the tall position and forward rather than low and partly beyond the rear axle. Looks like getting the center of gravity higher is less of a problem than moving it backwards. Happy new year!
    Not sure if it is still there, but the Yuba site used to have a video where Ben is using a Mundo to deliver two more Mundos to the shipping office, carrying them tall-wise as you found works best.

    Carrying weight low makes the bike easier to manage when stopped and/or parked. Carrying weight high, as long as it is secure, actually makes the bike more stable when moving, because it tends to fall over slower, giving more time for the bike or rider to steer the wheels back under the load.

    Carrying weight behind the rear axle is bad for several reasons. One that many do not appreciate is that when you steer left, weight behind the axle actually moves to the right before the whole shebang starts moving to the left. This is the wrong direction for balancing. You can carry _some_ weight back there, but it needs to be more than offset by the weight of the rider, bike, and loads carried well forward.

  21. #221
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    Does somebody have Yuba Go-getter bag in silver/gray version? (photo).
    I would like to buy this bag (preferably in black/orange colour), but at the local bike shop they have only the grey version and I am afraid that it will be very dirty after some time. Is it so?

  22. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumby_kevbo View Post
    Carrying weight low makes the bike easier to manage when stopped and/or parked. Carrying weight high, as long as it is secure, actually makes the bike more stable when moving, because it tends to fall over slower, giving more time for the bike or rider to steer the wheels back under the load.

    Carrying weight behind the rear axle is bad for several reasons. One that many do not appreciate is that when you steer left, weight behind the axle actually moves to the right before the whole shebang starts moving to the left. This is the wrong direction for balancing. You can carry _some_ weight back there, but it needs to be more than offset by the weight of the rider, bike, and loads carried well forward.
    I disagree with some of your ideas. while having the weight high does make tipping slower, it also means you have to do a lot more to keep the weight up there; you just have more time to do it. Practically speaking, a lower center of gravity on a cargo bike is almost always going to make the bike easier to handle, which might include tipping faster, but nobody cares if your 100 lb load on a fifty foot tall pole tips over slowly.

    To me the big thing about loads behind the axle isn't what direction they go when I turn, but that those loads can unweight the front wheel Having a good bit of weight on the front wheel is extremely important so that you get good traction during turns and braking. This is why I wouldn't want to ride an unloaded bakfiets down a big hill and try to stop quickly...not enough weight on the front wheel (or at least I suspect, but never actually tried this).

  23. #223
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    Yestarday I was going to work on my older bike and had some technical difficulties during ride, so I had to leave it locked halfway near a shopping mall.

    In the evening I came with my Mundo and for the first time tried towing. The second bike (with a front carrier and a box on it) was attached to the left side, all lights turned on and the ride could start. The bikes were perfectly ridable, only minus was the weight (both bikes had almost 50 kg together) and it was slight uphill from the mall to my home - I feeled it like a steep uphill in fact. Streets were empty at that time. Fog, no pedestrians, only few cars, but their drivers were looking curiosly and surprised, like the did not believe their own eyes

    Before action
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-before.jpg
    Ready to go
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-readytogo.jpg
    Mission completed
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-home.jpg

  24. #224
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    Jozo: What was the "technical difficulty?"

  25. #225
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    Problem with the freewheel after long winter with lack of servicing I was planning to put it to service next week, but unfortunately it did not last so long

  26. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    Problem with the freewheel after long winter with lack of servicing I was planning to put it to service next week, but unfortunately it did not last so long
    Reasons like this are why I avoided the complete. Fortunately, you can get bmx-style 3/8" to 14mm axle adapters and use a modern cassette hub. rear qr axles are 10mm and 3/8" is ~9.5mm, so you have to file out a bit of material, but it works well with a very tight qr (275 lb load plus my 190lb). Modern cassette hubs tend to be much longer lasting than multi-speed freewheels. and you have a wider range of gear options such as a 9sp 11-36t slx cassette.

    If the freewheel is just siezing, a penetrating or other thin oil dripped in from the back side (best choice is to do this with freewheel removed from hub to avoid washing out hub bearing grease) will often make it happy for many more miles.
    Last edited by PretendGentleman; 02-28-2013 at 06:03 AM.

  27. #227
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    Good job!

    Wow! I really like the idea of full fat yuba! Must have took all the tractor abilities from both worlds!

    I like the idea of fat bikes and I also like cargobikes. This could be such crazy thing I would do myself if got the coin for it.

  28. #228
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    I finally completed my fat Yuba. I used an old Surly fork with Surly tire in the front and NuVinci360 hub and Remerx Jumbo rim and Surly Endomorph tire at the back. The rear cog is 22 teeth Surly with the original Yuba crank and 42 teeth in the front (I could go as low as 40 teeth). This allowed me to move the chain enough to the right that it does not rub the tire. I had to keep the derailleur to keep the chain properly adjusted. The ride is perfect, you sit higher and kids at the back are happier (more cushioning from 4 inches of a tire). Suddenly the curbs are no obstacle to this monster. Snow, mud, grass, rock gardens - no problem!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-yubasmall.jpg  


  29. #229
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    clearance between chain and tire

    clearance between chain and tire
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-p1000695.jpg  


  30. #230
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    Fat Yuba in the house!!!!!

    Very nice Fox! How do you like the Nuvinci so far? I am building a Nuvinci360 wheel for mine too, just waiting on a hoop to come into stock. I dont know what those wheel skirts are but they look perfect on there.

  31. #231
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    Sand transport

    Transporting a sandbag remaining after Danube flood
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-yuba_sand.jpg

  32. #232
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    Made a back deck.


  33. #233
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    Anyone ever mount a Rohloff IGH on their Mundo? If so I would love to see pictures.

    OS RL

  34. #234
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    The shifting range of NuVinci is smaller than a traditional set up but it allows for an unlimited clearance of the rear tire. The wheelskirts are a leftover from BoBike Junior Child Seat. Post a picture after you are done.

  35. #235
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    Fat Yuba in the house!!!!!

    I got my Fat Yuba done and am loving it! I got my Nuvinci laced up but am not using it because I found something better! Single Speed!!!! 32/22 I posted pics on the Fatbike forum. here is the link: Fat Yuba is IN THE HOUSE!!!!

  36. #236
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    Nuvinci Hub with 65mm rims

    What the heck happened to the Pictures on this website! They changed the way pics are uploaded again and now it sucks! Why cant a box open up that lets me choose pics from my computer? why does it have to be a stupid URL?

    Computers are stupid, I'm going to go ride my bike!!!!!
    " F#ck it, lets go ride bikes!"

  37. #237
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    failed attemp at posting photos

    Message Failure
    " F#ck it, lets go ride bikes!"

  38. #238
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    Hi, anyone has an idea why pictures I posted on 06082013 do not show up anymore? They were visible for about two month and now this site only gives a message Attached Thumbnails-

  39. #239
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    All my pictures are gone too. WTF!
    " F#ck it, lets go ride bikes!"

  40. #240
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    There is a sweet Yuba Mundo postsed on Ebay right now. It looks like it comes with all kinds of good stuff.
    " F#ck it, lets go ride bikes!"

  41. #241
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    Just checked it out :O Dang how can i make that much money ASAP LOL ?
    Finally rolling on 29" x 2.0" Schwalbe Big Apples

  42. #242
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    The Yuba Mundo Thread

    Finally got around to installing lighting I had purchased some months back. Seldom have the Mundo out after dark, but when I have I always cursed myself for not putting good light on it. That problem is now in the past.

    Power comes from a Nordlicht bottle dynamo. I like hub dynamos a lot, but the Mundo wants a HD front wheel, lots of fat spokes, etc. which adds more cost and sourcing hassle beyond what is usual when adding a hub dynamo.



    I fabricated a crude bracket from 1/8x1-1/2 Al. It mounts to the fork via two 5mm threaded braze ons Yuba conveniently put inside the left fork leg. I guess this might be for a torque arm on the electric assist version.

    I made a couple light bends in the bracket to roughly match the radius of the fork blade. A couple layers of road bike tire soak up the difference. I had thought I might need to tie into the brake stud above the bracket, but it feels plenty solid without the added complexity. The braze ons stand proud of the surface of the fork. It is important that the tire layers are thicker than the shoulders of the braze ons, and have clearance holes large enough to clear the braze ons.

    The headlamp is a Phillips Saferide. These are significantly better than the next best thing, and cheaper to boot. A pain to get, though, as Phillips doesn't import them to US.

    Another hunk of Al and a couple of P clips secure it to the front of the basket.



    No photos of the rear light. I am not real happy with how I mounted it. I can only claim that it works. Will update when I have done it decently.

    Seems to work well. The bottle does add just noticeable drag, but nowhere near what I recall of the cheap stuff I had as a kid. I can hear some whine, but it is not all that loud. The Phillips lamp gives plenty of light. Seriously, you owe it to yourself to give one of the lights a try.

  43. #243
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    Today I was transporting new tires using my Mundo, two pictures:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-pneu1.jpg
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-pneu2.jpg

  44. #244
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    Sweet! Love it!

  45. #245
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    What is the widest tire you can run without modification and being able to use all gears on the V4 front and rear?

  46. #246
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    All I can tell is that Surly Endomorphe tire is too wide for a regular setup. 2.3" tires fitted just fine, fenders included.

  47. #247
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    I ran 2.5 hookworms with just a tiny bit of rub in the lowest gear.
    " F#ck it, lets go ride bikes!"

  48. #248
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    I have Yuba Mundo with the "one leg" kickstand. It does its work but there are some problems when I am loading heavier things. I have two 50 liter boxes on the bike and the best way to load them is to put the heaviest things to the center of the gravity of the bike. Thats theory. But when I load the left box, content slides to the right side (and away from the center of the gravity) and sometimes also the whole bike falls to the side (but only a few, because the box itself blocks it ). The content of the right box slides to the desired side (to the frame) but when I put into it too much, the whole bike tends to fall- and on this side there is no stand to block it from this. So the whole process of the bike loading seems much more like acrobacy than like normal cargo bike usage

    I am thinking about buying the Stand Alone Kickstand (Stand Alone Kickstand | Yuba Bicycles, Mundo Cargo Bike, Boda Boda Bike) which should grant horizontal position of the bottom of the boxes. One leg stand is rather stable when pressing the bike to the left side. Is it the same with the stand alone kickstand?

    I saw some video where a man stood on the sideloader and the bike was stable. Is it really so? I have a daughter which now knows that she can only go to the rear carrier from the left side (with no risk of the bike falling on her).

    What does the front wheel with the stability of the bike? Is it necessary to have some deflopilator to fix it in a stright position?

    Thanks for responses.

  49. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    I have Yuba Mundo with the "one leg" kickstand. It does its work but there are some problems when I am loading heavier things. I have two 50 liter boxes on the bike and the best way to load them is to put the heaviest things to the center of the gravity of the bike. Thats theory. But when I load the left box, content slides to the right side (and away from the center of the gravity) and sometimes also the whole bike falls to the side (but only a few, because the box itself blocks it ). The content of the right box slides to the desired side (to the frame) but when I put into it too much, the whole bike tends to fall- and on this side there is no stand to block it from this. So the whole process of the bike loading seems much more like acrobacy than like normal cargo bike usage

    I am thinking about buying the Stand Alone Kickstand (Stand Alone Kickstand | Yuba Bicycles, Mundo Cargo Bike, Boda Boda Bike) which should grant horizontal position of the bottom of the boxes. One leg stand is rather stable when pressing the bike to the left side. Is it the same with the stand alone kickstand?

    I saw some video where a man stood on the sideloader and the bike was stable. Is it really so? I have a daughter which now knows that she can only go to the rear carrier from the left side (with no risk of the bike falling on her).

    What does the front wheel with the stability of the bike? Is it necessary to have some deflopilator to fix it in a stright position?

    Thanks for responses.
    I'm happy with the stand alone kickstand, but you can still tip the bike over. When carrying two shipping pallets home, I'd have to lean the bike against a wall after putting one on, since it would tip the bike without the other. The deflopillator seems like its important. If the load is big, you don't want the strange instability that comes when your bars suddenly turn. I can't say for sure and you could figure out a way to keep the bars facing forward just while loading the bike for the same effect.

  50. #250
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    Get the StandAlone Kickstand. It definitely helps with loading. My kids are crawling all over the bike with it down. With most of the weight on the back, doesnt seem the deflopillator does much, but I have one anyway....

  51. #251
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    The StandAlone makes the bike quite stable, and level side-to-side. The parked bike does tilt back a bit (front wheel raised a couple inches) unless you have weight on the front (e.g. in a Bread Basket). With enough weight up front, the rear wheel will lift (and front wheel touch the ground) but the bike remains stable. At half the price of Xtracycle's kickstand, Yuba's StandAlone is a bargain. I do wonder how much weight it will support -- did the folks in North Carolina with that video of the 400-500 pounds of bananas use the StandAlone to keep the bike upright while loading it? If so, then you should have no worries about load in front of the wheel pushing down too much on the StandAlone.

    My complete included the deflopilator, and I like how it keeps the bars straight when the bike is parked. I have not tried to see how the front end would behave without it. It does seem to interfere a little bit with really low-speed tight turns (like trying to turn around when straddling the bike), but it's not too bad, and I think I would probably not want the front end to turn too quickly in those situations anyway.

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    During this season I had a front carrier attached to the fork and the handlebars. I unmounted it few weeks ago but I think this carrier could be too heavy for the deflopillator. Luckily I have also another front carrier which mounts to the frame.

    I see only one problem with the deflopillator - I park my bike in the apartment with the front wheel turned to the side (there is a limited space for the bike - just between one door and the wall). I think its not a good idea to have the deflopillator stretched all the time. Is it possible to easily release it from the frame/fork to turn the wheel to park the bike?

    Another possibility is to have the Mundo with the fork/handlebar attached carrier. Advantage of this is that bigger box can be mounted in front (I rode also with a 50 liter box in front), which is impossible with most of the frame mounted carriers - there would be a conflict when steering - handlebars would hit the box. Does somebody have this type of front carrier in combination with the StandAlone? How does it behave when parked? Does the use of the deflopillator make any sense?

  53. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    I see only one problem with the deflopillator ... Is it possible to easily release it from the frame/fork to turn the wheel to park the bike?
    No, it's not easy. The deflopilator kit basically puts eyelets on the fork crown and downtube, and the spring hooks into those eyelets. But the spring is under significant tension even when the fork is pointed straight, so it's not easy to undo the deflopilator by hand. If you wanted an undoable one you'd have to tweak it, and IMO probably ought to just build your own. Hey, it's just a spring. :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    Another possibility is to have the Mundo with the fork/handlebar attached carrier. Advantage of this is that bigger box can be mounted in front (I rode also with a 50 liter box in front), which is impossible with most of the frame mounted carriers - there would be a conflict when steering - handlebars would hit the box.
    Cable housing, too. And since it's frame-mounted, you can't hang panniers from Yuba's Bread Basket the way you can some fork-mounted porteur racks. So it's pretty limited in terms of the volume it can carry. But, especially with the liner, it's very handy and better for casual loads than some of the minimalist porteur racks that pretty much require you to bungie a separate bag to the rack if you're carrying anything small or floppy or that has straps, etc. I like that, even without the deflopilator, loads in the Bread Basket don't flop around when the bike is parked.

    With both fork and frame mounted front baskets, you need to think about headlight placement. With Bread Basket, I moved my battery-powered light out almost to the grips so that it would sit another inch or two higher and be less likely to be obscured by the front load. I'm considering mounting it on the front of the Bread Basket somehow.

  54. #254
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    My wife has had our 24 lb daughter in a Yepp Mini on the front of our Mundo (v4 frame) for about 7 months, but it's time to relocate her to the rear. We have a used Yepp Maxi EasyFit that I bought on Craigslist that I'm trying to install.

    I removed the bamboo deck from the rear rack and used two of those screws to secure the front of the Easyfit carrier to one of the cross bars on the rack. For the rear connections of the EasyFit carrier, I'm trying to use 2 of the "w-shaped" metal clamps (which I believe originally came with the Easyfit carrier) to clamp it to the side rails of the rear rack. Unfortunately, the clamps are not quite long enough and/or the slots in the Easyfit carrier are not quite wide enough to reach both side rails. By shifting the Easyfit carrier slightly to one side, I can clamp one side but not both.

    Has anyone else solved this problem? I got the clamps from a local Yepp dealer. Perhaps there are wider ones available or a newer Easyfit adapter would have slightly wider slots? Any ideas or suggestions are much appreciated! Thanks.

    Edit: you can see the clamp in Pic 2 of the Easyfit mounting instruction manual: http://www.yepp.nl/cms/files/Mountin...%20apr2012.pdf
    Last edited by DoubleEh; 12-30-2013 at 03:08 PM. Reason: Added link to Easyfit manual

  55. #255

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    I have Yuba Mundo v4 with V-brakes. I want to replace them with (perhaps mechanic) disc brakes, but I don't have any experience with this type of brakes. Do you have disc brakes on your Mundos? Which brakes are the best choice for a longtail cargo bike?

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    brakes

    I had original V-brakes on my Yuba. After my frame cracked and I was sent a new frame from Yuba as a replacement, I used Avid bb5 mechanical disc brakes for about over a year. They were pain in the neck, since I had to fine tune them all the time. I ended up installing the cheapest Shimano hydraulic brakes with 180 mm discs and I did not have to tune them nor deal with them in any way for over a year. My bike is used every day by me and my wife to haul our kids (11 and 8, close to 170 lb together), shopping etc. We have no car and Mundo has already been on a 100+ mile ride in one day. My Yuba is a home-altered-NuVinci-hub-snowbike-tires-equipped bicycle you can see in my earlier posts.

  58. #258
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    Re: The Yuba Mundo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    I have Yuba Mundo v4 with V-brakes. I want to replace them with (perhaps mechanic) disc brakes, but I don't have any experience with this type of brakes. Do you have disc brakes on your Mundos? Which brakes are the best choice for a longtail cargo bike?
    Hi Jozo,

    I've been using Avid BB7 mountain versions and are happy with them. You need to use 180mm rotors for your front wheel. 160mm in the rear is fine but 180 is better. Also, please make sure you get the right adaptors for the calipers. I suggest call Yuba tech support and they will also give you info on the exact parts that you need to fit the brakes well. Thanks.

    FBJ

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    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  59. #259
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    Thanks for replies. I also asked Yuba tech support and now I have new mechanic Avid BB7 brakes on my Mundo.

    Rear brake:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8791_1.jpg

    Front brake:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8793_1.jpg

    Whole bike:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8796_1.jpg

  60. #260
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    Jozo - are you pleased? Did you need any special parts, shims, etc? Is that a 180 in back?

  61. #261
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    I think disc brakes is the next investment for my Mundo.
    Look like a great way to go!

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    peterw_diy: The brakes were mounted in the bike shop, so I don't know exact details but yes, there are some shims and the seller looked like it was a lot of work to successfully do it (some shims, small recentering of the wheel and so on) . But they managed it and breaking is now better than before Both rotors are 180 mm.

    One more pic:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8794.jpg

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    Planning to look into project Yuba Mundo again on my end after finishing building up my electric Giant bike.

    Probably gonna end up selling the Giant (minue e bike kit) after this semester of university and get a Mundo... the Giant blends into the other bikes at uni, riding a Mundo is going to cause too much attention, of course after I graduate next semester I can finally ride a Mundo.

    So I have encountered a few things in my early stage of research.

    Is the bottom bracket 68mm? Been looking at some Sunrace & Shimano BB cartridges, hoping these are threaded the same as what's on a Mundo?

    The steerer/headset/fork, is it a 1 1/8" threadless system on a V4 (4.3) frame?

    I'm gonna be a cheapskate and get Shimano tourney components for the drivetrain since it will be electric for most part anyway, may go with Altus if I have spare change.

  64. #264
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    Re: The Yuba Mundo Thread

    yes, v4 has threadless 1 1/8 fork. Shimano BB will also work. Go mid drive if you can for your electric assist, best for cargo bikes.
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  65. #265
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    Last Wednesday I bought a new two leg stand and the Bagutte for my Mundo. The stand is great, much better than the former with one leg. Now I can comfortably sit on the rear deck while waiting for my wife I planned to buy the Gogetters bag but they were not on the stock so I took the Baguette. This one is smaller but for everyday commuting is satisfactory for my needs. But I think I will buy also the bigger one for longer trips .

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-heavypedals_1.jpg
    New equipment in front of Heavy Pedals bike shop in Vienna.

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dunaj_1.jpg
    On the bank of the Danube in Bratislava.

  66. #266
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    looking good Jozo. The bags for perfect. I think they are good sized for daily commute.

    Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

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    New question here. Tubeless?

    I'm dreading the day I get a flat on the Mundo.

    Any suggestions for going tubeless w/ the stock rims?
    Ghetto tubeless or Stans kit work?

  68. #268
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    A flat on the rear is a pain. I carry two wrenches (front and back use different sized nuts) taped under the rear seat pads. I also got slime tubes--they've worked really well. Pulled several thorns out of the tires and I could see the holes seal up instantly.
    功夫大师喜欢骑着他的自行车在山上。

  69. #269
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    ghetto tubeless will work. Use the 1" wide gorilla tape from Home Depot. They are nice and thick. STANS goop, tubeless valves and you are good to go.
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  70. #270
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    I got a flat tire on the rear wheel two weeks ago (first time on this wheel after 18 months I have it). The repair was not much more time consuming than on normal bike. The only one problem was that I didn't have the right size wrench but luckily I had variable size wrench. It was a little bit unconfortable (the wrench was constantly widening) but worked.
    Perhaps I should replace my tires, they look like they deserve it

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    I am very interested in getting a Yuba for hauling my kids to school and elsewhere, and for running to the grocery store. Because I have two kids I am driving more than riding now, and it is driving me crazy. How does the bike handle with 2 kids on the back (90 and 45 pounds)? I tried another brand's bike and once the kids were on the back the bike spontaneously did a wheelie and both kids fell off. Once I got on I could keep the front wheel down but it was very difficult to control with that much weight on the back.

    Also, how does it handle on windy trails? I'm not planning to do any real mountain biking, but we have a lot of dirt paths in town here and some of them wind around trees, and up some short hills.

    Thanks for any advice!

  72. #272
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    it's great, you will not regret getting one. my kids are heavier and the bike still handles great. One thing I like the most is the frame stiffness. Heavy loads and heavy kids don't affect the handling, doesn't feel flexy.
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

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    So the Yuba plan is still on the back of my head after many months. I now have an idea especially with my nephew and niece which want to come out for a bush bike ride with me. They're like 4 and 5, so the Mundo with extra rear seats should work for me.

    Anyway, I have a Mongoose Tyax MTB which I never use these days ever since going motorbike... so I suppose I'll move everything from that frame over to the Yuba frame (minus Suntour XCT forks) and it should work on the flat gravel trails with some fat tyres...?

    No electric assist however. Just pure pedal power so I actually LOSE weight.

  74. #274
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    My kids are 9 & 11 so a bit heavier than yours too. It's definitely a little shaky when starting up from a complete stop. Easy going for sure on straights. Gets a bit tough when doing sharp turns. I'm about 150, so it would probably help if I had more weight up front. But I havent noticed any problem with wheelies...

    Quote Originally Posted by wwrivers View Post
    I am very interested in getting a Yuba for hauling my kids to school and elsewhere, and for running to the grocery store. Because I have two kids I am driving more than riding now, and it is driving me crazy. How does the bike handle with 2 kids on the back (90 and 45 pounds)? I tried another brand's bike and once the kids were on the back the bike spontaneously did a wheelie and both kids fell off. Once I got on I could keep the front wheel down but it was very difficult to control with that much weight on the back.

    Also, how does it handle on windy trails? I'm not planning to do any real mountain biking, but we have a lot of dirt paths in town here and some of them wind around trees, and up some short hills.

    Thanks for any advice!

  75. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by wwrivers View Post
    I am very interested in getting a Yuba for hauling my kids to school and elsewhere, and for running to the grocery store. Because I have two kids I am driving more than riding now, and it is driving me crazy. How does the bike handle with 2 kids on the back (90 and 45 pounds)? I tried another brand's bike and once the kids were on the back the bike spontaneously did a wheelie and both kids fell off. Once I got on I could keep the front wheel down but it was very difficult to control with that much weight on the back.

    Also, how does it handle on windy trails? I'm not planning to do any real mountain biking, but we have a lot of dirt paths in town here and some of them wind around trees, and up some short hills.

    Thanks for any advice!
    I've carried two adult men on mine and it handles great. totally stable and getting going wasn't bad.

    I also use mine for trailworks sometimes and will load it up with tools and ride it on the trails, so handling is great. It's a long bike, so obviously tight turns can be an issue and pushing it up hills with the side loader rails is tough, as they get in the way. I'm thinking about taking off the side loader rails and just using a big bag on each side. It's just tough to store this bike in my limited space.

  76. #276
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    Thanks for the info everybody. I'm picking up a lux model next week! Can't wait to try it out.

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    Kindly asking if someone can provide approx. weight of Mundo Frameset?
    So, weight of frame + fork. And how does it compare to Big Dummy frameset weight

    Thanks in advance

  78. #278
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    I was going to put money down for a Yuba frame today... but I then heard it was Hi-Ten steel.

    My bikes stay undercover... but is it going to rust badly?

    I know the side loaders and the fork is chromoly and that doesn't rust much... but what about the Hi-Ten steel frame? Anyone had rust issues at all? Primarily say around the bottom bracket where water usually likes to hide on my bikes?

  79. #279
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    Quote Originally Posted by primooz View Post
    Kindly asking if someone can provide approx. weight of Mundo Frameset?
    So, weight of frame + fork. And how does it compare to Big Dummy frameset weight

    Thanks in advance
    It doesn't matter. I mean, I don't know, but also, it doesn't matter.
    '15 Specialized Fatboy
    '14 Kona Zone Two
    '13 Surly Big Dummy

  80. #280
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    Nice Fat Mundo! I was thinking of doing something new to my V4 frame with my mid drive kit. Your Fat Mundo is cool!

    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    I finally completed my fat Yuba. I used an old Surly fork with Surly tire in the front and NuVinci360 hub and Remerx Jumbo rim and Surly Endomorph tire at the back. The rear cog is 22 teeth Surly with the original Yuba crank and 42 teeth in the front (I could go as low as 40 teeth). This allowed me to move the chain enough to the right that it does not rub the tire. I had to keep the derailleur to keep the chain properly adjusted. The ride is perfect, you sit higher and kids at the back are happier (more cushioning from 4 inches of a tire). Suddenly the curbs are no obstacle to this monster. Snow, mud, grass, rock gardens - no problem!
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  81. #281
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    Shopping

    I had big shopping weekend. The lady in the window didnt like my setup, but I just told her, "Its Fine!"

    Last edited by normonster; 03-03-2015 at 05:55 PM. Reason: change html link to vb

  82. #282
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    One older photo:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-yuba-xmas.jpg

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    Solar Augmented Electric Yubas

    Just completed a 5,000 km tour on these, up the east coast of australia.

    Total weight for each rig (without rider), 130 kg's
    All batteries, 26 amp hour LiFePo4 (for electric motor on bike) and batteries for computer and mobile phones, recharged by the solar.

    Interesting to read some of the posts on this thread re Yuba frame alignment problems, more on this soon.....

    Andy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-image.jpg  


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    I have also been to IKEA here in Philadelphia a couple of times to get some chests of drawers. Took a while to get everything strapped in but it was fine and one does feel quite bad-ass riding home like that.

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    Modding for speed in the city

    Modding for speed in the city

    This is a first of a number of posts I have been planning for a while on how in I chose to updgrade and mod the Yuba Mundo for my purposes.
    I wanted the updates to make the bike faster but also wanted to keep it safe as I am doing 80% of the rides in the city (Philadelphia) with one or two kids on the bike.
    I will post pictures soon (can't yet).

    First update: Gears

    When you get the bike you get all excited and feel that you max out on speed rather quickly and wish you had more gears.
    The best solution in terms of bang for the buck is to swap out the freewheel with the 13-28T version (look on Amazon for "Shimano 7-Speed Tourney Bicycle Freewheel - MF-HG37"). It costs around $15. You will need Park Tool FR-1 and a chain whip.
    Why a new freewheel and not a bigger chainset? Because by going from 14 to 13 in terms of the smallest sproket on the freewheel you will get more speed (i.e. feet per pedal rotation) compared to going for a larger chainset (unless you for a 52 or 53). It is also much cheaper. Don't believe me? Then go and play around with the gear calculator Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

    Second update: Tires

    1) As I am in the city the biggest annoyance is to get a flat. The best solution is to add Mr Tuffy Bicycle Tire Liner to my tires. It's a thick plastic strip that goes between the tire and the tube. You will probably need the brown version (Mr Tuffy are color coded for size.). I added them a year ago and had no problems anymore and believe me Philly roads are a nightmare.

    2) Want to go faster? Want to avoid bent wheels and punctures? Pump up the tires to max. Based on info on the Schwalbe webpage you want to add rather the reduce pressure when you carry more load. Given my and my kids weight I am now and the max permissible.

    More to follow. Comments and reactions welcome.

  86. #286
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    Quote Originally Posted by gauguin View Post
    Modding for speed in the city

    This is a first of a number of posts I have been planning for a while on how in I chose to updgrade and mod the Yuba Mundo for my purposes.
    I wanted the updates to make the bike faster but also wanted to keep it safe as I am doing 80% of the rides in the city (Philadelphia) with one or two kids on the bike.
    I will post pictures soon (can't yet).

    First update: Gears

    When you get the bike you get all excited and feel that you max out on speed rather quickly and wish you had more gears.
    The best solution in terms of bang for the buck is to swap out the freewheel with the 13-28T version (look on Amazon for "Shimano 7-Speed Tourney Bicycle Freewheel - MF-HG37"). It costs around $15. You will need Park Tool FR-1 and a chain whip.
    Why a new freewheel and not a bigger chainset? Because by going from 14 to 13 in terms of the smallest sproket on the freewheel you will get more speed (i.e. feet per pedal rotation) compared to going for a larger chainset (unless you for a 52 or 53). It is also much cheaper. Don't believe me? Then go and play around with the gear calculator Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

    Second update: Tires

    1) As I am in the city the biggest annoyance is to get a flat. The best solution is to add Mr Tuffy Bicycle Tire Liner to my tires. It's a thick plastic strip that goes between the tire and the tube. You will probably need the brown version (Mr Tuffy are color coded for size.). I added them a year ago and had no problems anymore and believe me Philly roads are a nightmare.

    2) Want to go faster? Want to avoid bent wheels and punctures? Pump up the tires to max. Based on info on the Schwalbe webpage you want to add rather the reduce pressure when you carry more load. Given my and my kids weight I am now and the max permissible.

    More to follow. Comments and reactions welcome.
    here're a few thoughts based on my experience

    the 14mm axle and freewheels sytem will always be problematic for gearing and durability. A modern cassette works great. I used profile bmx 3/8" to 14mm adaptors and had to grind out a small amount to get them to work with the 10mm axle. With a cassette hub, you can run an 11-36 cluster and the axle is stronger than the 14mm axle due to the placement of the drive side bearings.

    *Often running max tires pressure is too high. I recommend trying different tire pressures and find the right one for you and the load you are carrying. When tires are too hard, you get a bumpy ride and have to work harder. Too soft is worse, but the right pressure is best.

    *Mr tuffy tire liners are inferior, in my experience, to high quality tiers that are flat resistant. I've seen it over and over again where a tube gets a flat from the edge of the MR tuffy rubbing a hole in the tube.

  87. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    here're a few thoughts based on my experience

    the 14mm axle and freewheels sytem will always be problematic for gearing and durability. A modern cassette works great. I used profile bmx 3/8" to 14mm adaptors and had to grind out a small amount to get them to work with the 10mm axle. With a cassette hub, you can run an 11-36 cluster and the axle is stronger than the 14mm axle due to the placement of the drive side bearings.

    *Often running max tires pressure is too high. I recommend trying different tire pressures and find the right one for you and the load you are carrying. When tires are too hard, you get a bumpy ride and have to work harder. Too soft is worse, but the right pressure is best.

    *Mr tuffy tire liners are inferior, in my experience, to high quality tiers that are flat resistant. I've seen it over and over again where a tube gets a flat from the edge of the MR tuffy rubbing a hole in the tube.
    I saw your post before re adaptor to add regular cassette. Could you please (!) post a link for the adaptor you used and perhaps a pic of what the final product looks like.

    I agree on having better tires is superior to Mr Tuffy - but honestly two new Schwalbe Marathon Plus were quit a bit more expensive than Mr Tuffy and I have been riding them for over a year and had no flats. The tires the Mundo came with however were not great as the side walls deteriorated rather quickly (I keep my bike outside all the time plus ride in the winter). So I now swapped them out for Schwalbe Marathons (the regular ones) with Mr Tuffy inside.

    Yes, getting the pressure right is crucial. Not sure why higher pressure means more work though. It makes ride more bumpy for sure but the rolling resistance is lower.

  88. #288
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    The Yuba Mundo Thread-20150417_194520.jpgFirst time poster/new member of MTBR. It's interesting to see this thread steadily trucking along (pun intended) after so may years. I'll chime in with a more thorough posting about my own Yuba experiences pretty soon. I built my bike from a bare frame, bought from Yuba through a LBS. I chose to go all custom to get exactly what I wanted on the build, also because I have numerous parts to use that were much higher quality spec than a stock Yuba.

    What I'm really curious about is the set up on those two Yubas posted by Mechandy, and those trailers and how they're hitched up. I really hope he comes back and posts a follow up, but it looks like he's just got the one post and that was two weeks ago.

    I can make an observation regarding tires though. I built mine originally with the Maxxis Hookworms in mind and found almost immediately that they were hands-down the WORST tires I've ever owned. They're incredibly sluggish, making the bike hard to pedal like you're riding through quicksand or something, not to mention the tread compound is so soft they can be easily shredded by tiny pieces of sharp gravel. We're not even talking glass here, just bits of really coarse sand that would eat their way into the tires and just shred the tubes. Also, even with a 127mm bottom bracket and a 2mm spacer on the drive side, I was getting rubbing in the lowest gears against the 2.50 tire sidewall.

    Fed up with the repeated flats, chewing-gum-on-a-hot-day consistency tire tread, and ultra-sluggish feel, I swapped the Hookworms (26x2.50) out for Schwalbe Big Apples (26x2.35) and noticed massive improvements across the board. The tires are pretty much puncture-proof, rolling resistance is way lower than the Hookworms, and gone is that sluggish high-effort pedaling.

    I'm going to be posting a full build of my Yuba on my blog at velocelt.blogspot.com which will have many photos and will detail everything I selected component-wise and why, and how things changed over the intervening weeks since I first finished the build. I've been riding my Yuba now for almost two months and approximately about 800 miles, so I think I've fine tuned almost everything at this point. There are a few little tweaks left to do but for the most part I'm calling the build finished.

  89. #289
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    Hi Velo Celt, you can check out the Yuba / Solar Trailer build on my Flickr site link below. They were taken when the project was nearly complete (the trailers still needed wiring tidy up and power outlet / fuse boxes fitted), back in late 2013 about a month before we set off on the journey. We loaded them up with all the gear we were taking on the trip, and went to the local farmers market for a test ride. Will check out your Yuba project on your blog shortly, cheers Andy
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mechan...57637703626494

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    your experience and recommendation for best front disc breaks

    I am looking to upgrade my front breaks. I never felt that I lacked in stopping power with the breaks that came with the bike given I change pads every 2-3 months but I am starting to feel anachronistic plus my two kids are getting heavier so I might benefit from the additional stopping power (unless there aren't any given I am a road-rider).

    What break-rotor combination did you have the best experience with?

    I was thinking of getting the Avid BB7 given they are mechanical.
    What is the best rotor and rotor-size for them?
    Any other suggestions you have would be most appreciated.

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    Hi Gauguin, I went with the Avid BB7 on the front but stuck with the V Brake rear, mostly because the disc brake lug alignment on the Yuba frame is notorious for being 'out' and this would have added more headaches to the build, especially as I fitted a Rohloff to the rear. We descended a number of 18% gradients on our trip (very slowly!) and the brakes held up well. We had to stop a few times on those descents (to let the brakes cool down), but then again, each rig weighs over 200 kg, rig weight plus rider. We did have an issue with the Velocity rims splitting uniformly (on both of the bikes rear wheels) around the full circumferance, at the bottom of the V Brake braking surface, but this was due to a combination of issues, weight, heat and tyre pressure. I'll post a pic of the split shortly......

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    Thank you mechandy.
    what rotor size do you have on them? 160 or 180?
    Did you keep the break lever or change it to a different lever?

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    Mechandy - thanks for posting the update with the flickr link. That looks like a really nice setup. Was that a cello in the big case on one of the bikes, and is there some sort of instrument in the black case on the other? Were you busking your way along on that trip? What model of mid-drive motor is that? So far, my Yuba is human-powered only, but I've already decided a future upgrade will be a mid-drive motor of some sort. Currently I'm trying to learn as much as possible about the various options available. I also like your use of the motorcycle mirrors. I'm currently making do without mirrors on my bike, but during a brief period of owning a recumbent I grew to like the handlebar mounted mirror. Right now though, I need to carry my bike up and down two short flights of stairs each day so a mirror would probably be getting knocked out of alignment all the time. More hassle than it's worth at this I think.

    Since I built my Yuba from the bare frame up, I used a much more robust set of wheels than the stock ones. My rims are Sun Ryhno-lite 32 hole downhill/free-ride/enduro rims that are eyeletted, and are double-walled and triple-boxed in construction. They're 27mm wide and I use them with 26x2.35 Schwalbe Big Apple tires.

    Gauguin - I use Avid BB7 brakes front and rear on my Yuba. My frame is the latest v4.3 and I had no issues with how my brake mounts were. I could see how maybe there is some individual quality control, but I had no problems. Yuba requires a 180mm rotor in the back and a 160mm rotor in the front. I used Avid Speed Dial brake levers as well because they offer the best option for tailoring the feel of the brakes, whether you like a spongier feeling lever or a harder lever. I prefer a very hard brake lever so I was able to set mine up to have similar feel in both levers. Typically with such a long cable run to the rear brake you'll have a spongier feeling rear brake than the front, but at least with the Speed Dial levers you can have similar brake lever feel, even if the stopping power is a little spongy because of the long run. You can get slightly better modulation by using a compressionless segmented housing, but they're pretty pricey.

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    Hi Velo Celt,

    thank you. this is very helpful. I am all sold on the BB7 but I am still wondering if it is worth spending another $50-70 more for a stronger hydraulic system? Any opinions? I think for all intents and purposes the BB7 should be strong enough, right?

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    gauguin - all you'll get from hydros is better modulation. Stopping power will pretty much be the same, especially if you spring for higher quality housing. Also, with hydros you'll need to get a longer hose for the rear, at least from what I've heard. The stock hose won't be long enough for the run to the rear brake. That means before you've even set up the brakes you'll be needing to drain and bleed them. Personally, I prefer the simplicity of mechanical discs. The other thing to consider if you have hydros is every time you remove a wheel to patch a tube or something you need a special spacer to go into the caliper so the pads don't close up, preventing you from getting the rotor back in. With mechanicals this doesn't happen.

  96. #296
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    Agree with everything Velo Celt has said re hydraulics versus mechanical, much more simple. In the case of the special spacer, this is only required if you accidentally squeeze the brake lever whilst the wheel (and disc rotor) is out of the frame (caliper). If you do not squeeze the brake lever, the pads will stay in their original position, enabling you to get the wheel and rotor back in place. As a qualified bike mechanic, I work on hydraulic systems regularly, and I do not use a spacer. BUT, if you are concerned that you may accidentally squeeze the brake lever with the wheel out, by all means, get the spacer!

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    Yuba Quality Control

    I wrote in a previos comment that I'd be posting more about Yuba quality control. I've owned a version 1 blue 'tank' and now, a version 4. The quality control of Yuba manufacturing is improving, and I have to say that the Yuba is a great bike, it has enabled us to do many things that would have been impossible on most other bikes. They are tough, sturdy and cruzy to ride, and it is not easy to find another bike that will handle the punishing 130 kg cargo weight that we carry. The quality control issues that I list below, are simply for others to consider and check out. The distributor for Yuba here in Australia has been great, any QC issues we've had, have been quickly fixed with replacement parts.

    1) Frame

    The photo below shows the misalignment of the rear dropouts, on one of the V4's. The frame was replaced free of charge by the Yuba distributor in Australia. There are two spirit levels in this pic, one showing the floor level and the other the rear dropout level, from both a distance and above (spirit level bubble) shot. This bike also had front fork issues, one fork longer than the other, resulting in a skewed wheel.

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    2) Rims

    It is rare for most people to remove the rim tape from their wheels, unless, you are trying to work out why the rims have cracked around the nippless, or, because the rim tape needs replacing. What I found, once the rim tape was removed, is that the automatic spoke tension machine, used during manufacture of the Yuba rims, had damaged the outer wall and removed a big proportion of some of the nipple heads. Again, Yuba in Australia were more than happy to replace these, but since we were installing Velocity Cliff Hanger rims, we didn't take up their offer. Apologies for the blurred photo's below. You can though, see the rim damage and the Brass of the nipples heads, after the chrome coating has been chewed off, by the spoke tensioning machine.

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    This is not a 'complaint' post, Yuba have been very good in responding to these issues, but you might want to check out your own Yuba's, just in case......

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    Yuba Electric Assist

    Hi Velo Celt, yes that isa Cello on the back of my travelling companions bike! She's a Professional Musician / Composer who tours around Australia performing at venues. The black case on my bike is for my Mandolin, but I'm only just learning to play it so I'd call myself a 'hack' at this stage! The motor set up I designed and manufactured myself. It's a stock standard electric bike / scooter motor with a reduction gearbox. The gearbox and the cog ratios enable us to get the maximum torque out of the motor and a nice easy cadence. For the attachment of the motor to the seat post, I manufacture a metal plate for the motor base and this is then attatched to two 'Stauff' hydraulic hose clamps, which clamp around the seat post. Many years ago I worked in the hydraulic and pneumatic industry designing control equipment for manufacturing companies. The Stauff clamps are widely used for clamping hydraulic hoses and can withstand considerable forces (in many directions) without losing grip of the hose. They are UV stable, oil, petrol and harsh environment resistant, often used on offshore drilling rig applications. I came up with the idea to use them when I discovered that they are made in a size that perfectly fits the Yuba seat post diameter! An added bonus is that because they are made out of a plastic material, they do not damage the paint or steel tube when clamped tightly on.

    Most of the other drivetrain components, including the left hand crank cog, freewheel, bottom bracket bearing kit and adaptors, longer BB spindle, I sourced from Staton Inc in the USA. (link below). The motor chain tensioner I made myself using an old V Brake arm and a rollerblade wheel. A recess for the chain can easily be created in the wheel, by inserting a bolt through the rollerblade wheel bearing, inserting the bolt into a drill chuck, and whilst the drill is running, using a small sharp wood chisel, simply cutting a groove about 5 mm deep.

    Home

    Yep, the motorcycle mirrors have been great! No vibration, so you can see everything clearly and the left hand mirror is very handy when crossing motorway or highway on ramps! I can certainly understand though how they would be a pain when needing to carry your bike up a couple of flights of stairs!........

  99. #299
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    Rims for heavyweight touring

    Here in Australia we are pretty limited in choice of range when it comes to bike components, if you want anything decent, going overseas is the only choice. We had a limited time-frame for the Yuba builds outlined above, before we hit the road, and some components just had to be ordered locally to get everything done. The Velocity Cliff Hanger rims, were the best we could get at short notice, but they lasted only 3,500 km's, before this happened,

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-image.jpg

    The rear rims on both bikes split uniformly around the entire circumference on both sides, the only thing holding the rims together, was the rim tape.

    A number of factors caused this. The weight of the rig plus rider, the tyre pressures, ambient temperatures here in Australia, rim temperature due to braking, leading to an overall increase in temperature, which increased tyre pressure.

    We had been running our tyre pressures at pretty much max, due to our load, but when riding 4 to 5 hours per day, almost everyday, in hot conditions, and using the brakes, the air pressure inside the tube / tyre can increase enormously. This places considerable strain on the rims.

    So how did we fix it? Firstly by reducing tyre pressure. Secondly by fitting Ryde Andra 30 rims (although, as Velo Celt suggests, the Sun Rhino's would be equally as good). The good thing about the Ryde Andra 30's, is that they have an option for the spoke exit angle to be drilled specifically to suit the Rohloff internal geared hub, a big plus for us.

    We had to order them from Europe as there is no distributor for them here in Australia. At 735 grams each, they also weigh a lot, but they are built solid as. Here's the link.....

    Products | Ryde

  100. #300
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velo Celt View Post
    gauguin - all you'll get from hydros is better modulation. Stopping power will pretty much be the same, especially if you spring for higher quality housing. Also, with hydros you'll need to get a longer hose for the rear, at least from what I've heard. The stock hose won't be long enough for the run to the rear brake. That means before you've even set up the brakes you'll be needing to drain and bleed them. Personally, I prefer the simplicity of mechanical discs. The other thing to consider if you have hydros is every time you remove a wheel to patch a tube or something you need a special spacer to go into the caliper so the pads don't close up, preventing you from getting the rotor back in. With mechanicals this doesn't happen.
    Velo Celt,
    Sorry for the slow reply. Too busy arguing with car drivers here in Philly who park in the no stopping areas of bike lanes....

    I ordered a BB7 for the front and can't wait to install it!

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