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  1. #276
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    Thanks for the info everybody. I'm picking up a lux model next week! Can't wait to try it out.

  2. #277
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    Kindly asking if someone can provide approx. weight of Mundo Frameset?
    So, weight of frame + fork. And how does it compare to Big Dummy frameset weight

    Thanks in advance

  3. #278
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    I was going to put money down for a Yuba frame today... but I then heard it was Hi-Ten steel.

    My bikes stay undercover... but is it going to rust badly?

    I know the side loaders and the fork is chromoly and that doesn't rust much... but what about the Hi-Ten steel frame? Anyone had rust issues at all? Primarily say around the bottom bracket where water usually likes to hide on my bikes?

  4. #279
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    Quote Originally Posted by primooz View Post
    Kindly asking if someone can provide approx. weight of Mundo Frameset?
    So, weight of frame + fork. And how does it compare to Big Dummy frameset weight

    Thanks in advance
    It doesn't matter. I mean, I don't know, but also, it doesn't matter.
    '12 Transition Bandit 29
    '13 Surly Big Dummy
    '15 Specialized Fatboy
    '14 Kona Zone Two

  5. #280
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    Nice Fat Mundo! I was thinking of doing something new to my V4 frame with my mid drive kit. Your Fat Mundo is cool!

    Quote Originally Posted by fox1965 View Post
    I finally completed my fat Yuba. I used an old Surly fork with Surly tire in the front and NuVinci360 hub and Remerx Jumbo rim and Surly Endomorph tire at the back. The rear cog is 22 teeth Surly with the original Yuba crank and 42 teeth in the front (I could go as low as 40 teeth). This allowed me to move the chain enough to the right that it does not rub the tire. I had to keep the derailleur to keep the chain properly adjusted. The ride is perfect, you sit higher and kids at the back are happier (more cushioning from 4 inches of a tire). Suddenly the curbs are no obstacle to this monster. Snow, mud, grass, rock gardens - no problem!
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  6. #281
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    Shopping

    I had big shopping weekend. The lady in the window didnt like my setup, but I just told her, "Its Fine!"

    Last edited by normonster; 03-03-2015 at 04:55 PM. Reason: change html link to vb

  7. #282
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    One older photo:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-yuba-xmas.jpg

  8. #283
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    Solar Augmented Electric Yubas

    Just completed a 5,000 km tour on these, up the east coast of australia.

    Total weight for each rig (without rider), 130 kg's
    All batteries, 26 amp hour LiFePo4 (for electric motor on bike) and batteries for computer and mobile phones, recharged by the solar.

    Interesting to read some of the posts on this thread re Yuba frame alignment problems, more on this soon.....

    Andy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The Yuba Mundo Thread-image.jpg  


  9. #284
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    I have also been to IKEA here in Philadelphia a couple of times to get some chests of drawers. Took a while to get everything strapped in but it was fine and one does feel quite bad-ass riding home like that.

  10. #285
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    Modding for speed in the city

    Modding for speed in the city

    This is a first of a number of posts I have been planning for a while on how in I chose to updgrade and mod the Yuba Mundo for my purposes.
    I wanted the updates to make the bike faster but also wanted to keep it safe as I am doing 80% of the rides in the city (Philadelphia) with one or two kids on the bike.
    I will post pictures soon (can't yet).

    First update: Gears

    When you get the bike you get all excited and feel that you max out on speed rather quickly and wish you had more gears.
    The best solution in terms of bang for the buck is to swap out the freewheel with the 13-28T version (look on Amazon for "Shimano 7-Speed Tourney Bicycle Freewheel - MF-HG37"). It costs around $15. You will need Park Tool FR-1 and a chain whip.
    Why a new freewheel and not a bigger chainset? Because by going from 14 to 13 in terms of the smallest sproket on the freewheel you will get more speed (i.e. feet per pedal rotation) compared to going for a larger chainset (unless you for a 52 or 53). It is also much cheaper. Don't believe me? Then go and play around with the gear calculator Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

    Second update: Tires

    1) As I am in the city the biggest annoyance is to get a flat. The best solution is to add Mr Tuffy Bicycle Tire Liner to my tires. It's a thick plastic strip that goes between the tire and the tube. You will probably need the brown version (Mr Tuffy are color coded for size.). I added them a year ago and had no problems anymore and believe me Philly roads are a nightmare.

    2) Want to go faster? Want to avoid bent wheels and punctures? Pump up the tires to max. Based on info on the Schwalbe webpage you want to add rather the reduce pressure when you carry more load. Given my and my kids weight I am now and the max permissible.

    More to follow. Comments and reactions welcome.

  11. #286
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    Quote Originally Posted by gauguin View Post
    Modding for speed in the city

    This is a first of a number of posts I have been planning for a while on how in I chose to updgrade and mod the Yuba Mundo for my purposes.
    I wanted the updates to make the bike faster but also wanted to keep it safe as I am doing 80% of the rides in the city (Philadelphia) with one or two kids on the bike.
    I will post pictures soon (can't yet).

    First update: Gears

    When you get the bike you get all excited and feel that you max out on speed rather quickly and wish you had more gears.
    The best solution in terms of bang for the buck is to swap out the freewheel with the 13-28T version (look on Amazon for "Shimano 7-Speed Tourney Bicycle Freewheel - MF-HG37"). It costs around $15. You will need Park Tool FR-1 and a chain whip.
    Why a new freewheel and not a bigger chainset? Because by going from 14 to 13 in terms of the smallest sproket on the freewheel you will get more speed (i.e. feet per pedal rotation) compared to going for a larger chainset (unless you for a 52 or 53). It is also much cheaper. Don't believe me? Then go and play around with the gear calculator Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

    Second update: Tires

    1) As I am in the city the biggest annoyance is to get a flat. The best solution is to add Mr Tuffy Bicycle Tire Liner to my tires. It's a thick plastic strip that goes between the tire and the tube. You will probably need the brown version (Mr Tuffy are color coded for size.). I added them a year ago and had no problems anymore and believe me Philly roads are a nightmare.

    2) Want to go faster? Want to avoid bent wheels and punctures? Pump up the tires to max. Based on info on the Schwalbe webpage you want to add rather the reduce pressure when you carry more load. Given my and my kids weight I am now and the max permissible.

    More to follow. Comments and reactions welcome.
    here're a few thoughts based on my experience

    the 14mm axle and freewheels sytem will always be problematic for gearing and durability. A modern cassette works great. I used profile bmx 3/8" to 14mm adaptors and had to grind out a small amount to get them to work with the 10mm axle. With a cassette hub, you can run an 11-36 cluster and the axle is stronger than the 14mm axle due to the placement of the drive side bearings.

    *Often running max tires pressure is too high. I recommend trying different tire pressures and find the right one for you and the load you are carrying. When tires are too hard, you get a bumpy ride and have to work harder. Too soft is worse, but the right pressure is best.

    *Mr tuffy tire liners are inferior, in my experience, to high quality tiers that are flat resistant. I've seen it over and over again where a tube gets a flat from the edge of the MR tuffy rubbing a hole in the tube.

  12. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    here're a few thoughts based on my experience

    the 14mm axle and freewheels sytem will always be problematic for gearing and durability. A modern cassette works great. I used profile bmx 3/8" to 14mm adaptors and had to grind out a small amount to get them to work with the 10mm axle. With a cassette hub, you can run an 11-36 cluster and the axle is stronger than the 14mm axle due to the placement of the drive side bearings.

    *Often running max tires pressure is too high. I recommend trying different tire pressures and find the right one for you and the load you are carrying. When tires are too hard, you get a bumpy ride and have to work harder. Too soft is worse, but the right pressure is best.

    *Mr tuffy tire liners are inferior, in my experience, to high quality tiers that are flat resistant. I've seen it over and over again where a tube gets a flat from the edge of the MR tuffy rubbing a hole in the tube.
    I saw your post before re adaptor to add regular cassette. Could you please (!) post a link for the adaptor you used and perhaps a pic of what the final product looks like.

    I agree on having better tires is superior to Mr Tuffy - but honestly two new Schwalbe Marathon Plus were quit a bit more expensive than Mr Tuffy and I have been riding them for over a year and had no flats. The tires the Mundo came with however were not great as the side walls deteriorated rather quickly (I keep my bike outside all the time plus ride in the winter). So I now swapped them out for Schwalbe Marathons (the regular ones) with Mr Tuffy inside.

    Yes, getting the pressure right is crucial. Not sure why higher pressure means more work though. It makes ride more bumpy for sure but the rolling resistance is lower.

  13. #288
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    The Yuba Mundo Thread-20150417_194520.jpgFirst time poster/new member of MTBR. It's interesting to see this thread steadily trucking along (pun intended) after so may years. I'll chime in with a more thorough posting about my own Yuba experiences pretty soon. I built my bike from a bare frame, bought from Yuba through a LBS. I chose to go all custom to get exactly what I wanted on the build, also because I have numerous parts to use that were much higher quality spec than a stock Yuba.

    What I'm really curious about is the set up on those two Yubas posted by Mechandy, and those trailers and how they're hitched up. I really hope he comes back and posts a follow up, but it looks like he's just got the one post and that was two weeks ago.

    I can make an observation regarding tires though. I built mine originally with the Maxxis Hookworms in mind and found almost immediately that they were hands-down the WORST tires I've ever owned. They're incredibly sluggish, making the bike hard to pedal like you're riding through quicksand or something, not to mention the tread compound is so soft they can be easily shredded by tiny pieces of sharp gravel. We're not even talking glass here, just bits of really coarse sand that would eat their way into the tires and just shred the tubes. Also, even with a 127mm bottom bracket and a 2mm spacer on the drive side, I was getting rubbing in the lowest gears against the 2.50 tire sidewall.

    Fed up with the repeated flats, chewing-gum-on-a-hot-day consistency tire tread, and ultra-sluggish feel, I swapped the Hookworms (26x2.50) out for Schwalbe Big Apples (26x2.35) and noticed massive improvements across the board. The tires are pretty much puncture-proof, rolling resistance is way lower than the Hookworms, and gone is that sluggish high-effort pedaling.

    I'm going to be posting a full build of my Yuba on my blog at velocelt.blogspot.com which will have many photos and will detail everything I selected component-wise and why, and how things changed over the intervening weeks since I first finished the build. I've been riding my Yuba now for almost two months and approximately about 800 miles, so I think I've fine tuned almost everything at this point. There are a few little tweaks left to do but for the most part I'm calling the build finished.

  14. #289
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    Hi Velo Celt, you can check out the Yuba / Solar Trailer build on my Flickr site link below. They were taken when the project was nearly complete (the trailers still needed wiring tidy up and power outlet / fuse boxes fitted), back in late 2013 about a month before we set off on the journey. We loaded them up with all the gear we were taking on the trip, and went to the local farmers market for a test ride. Will check out your Yuba project on your blog shortly, cheers Andy
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mechan...57637703626494

  15. #290
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    your experience and recommendation for best front disc breaks

    I am looking to upgrade my front breaks. I never felt that I lacked in stopping power with the breaks that came with the bike given I change pads every 2-3 months but I am starting to feel anachronistic plus my two kids are getting heavier so I might benefit from the additional stopping power (unless there aren't any given I am a road-rider).

    What break-rotor combination did you have the best experience with?

    I was thinking of getting the Avid BB7 given they are mechanical.
    What is the best rotor and rotor-size for them?
    Any other suggestions you have would be most appreciated.

  16. #291
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    Hi Gauguin, I went with the Avid BB7 on the front but stuck with the V Brake rear, mostly because the disc brake lug alignment on the Yuba frame is notorious for being 'out' and this would have added more headaches to the build, especially as I fitted a Rohloff to the rear. We descended a number of 18% gradients on our trip (very slowly!) and the brakes held up well. We had to stop a few times on those descents (to let the brakes cool down), but then again, each rig weighs over 200 kg, rig weight plus rider. We did have an issue with the Velocity rims splitting uniformly (on both of the bikes rear wheels) around the full circumferance, at the bottom of the V Brake braking surface, but this was due to a combination of issues, weight, heat and tyre pressure. I'll post a pic of the split shortly......

  17. #292
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    Thank you mechandy.
    what rotor size do you have on them? 160 or 180?
    Did you keep the break lever or change it to a different lever?

  18. #293
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    Mechandy - thanks for posting the update with the flickr link. That looks like a really nice setup. Was that a cello in the big case on one of the bikes, and is there some sort of instrument in the black case on the other? Were you busking your way along on that trip? What model of mid-drive motor is that? So far, my Yuba is human-powered only, but I've already decided a future upgrade will be a mid-drive motor of some sort. Currently I'm trying to learn as much as possible about the various options available. I also like your use of the motorcycle mirrors. I'm currently making do without mirrors on my bike, but during a brief period of owning a recumbent I grew to like the handlebar mounted mirror. Right now though, I need to carry my bike up and down two short flights of stairs each day so a mirror would probably be getting knocked out of alignment all the time. More hassle than it's worth at this I think.

    Since I built my Yuba from the bare frame up, I used a much more robust set of wheels than the stock ones. My rims are Sun Ryhno-lite 32 hole downhill/free-ride/enduro rims that are eyeletted, and are double-walled and triple-boxed in construction. They're 27mm wide and I use them with 26x2.35 Schwalbe Big Apple tires.

    Gauguin - I use Avid BB7 brakes front and rear on my Yuba. My frame is the latest v4.3 and I had no issues with how my brake mounts were. I could see how maybe there is some individual quality control, but I had no problems. Yuba requires a 180mm rotor in the back and a 160mm rotor in the front. I used Avid Speed Dial brake levers as well because they offer the best option for tailoring the feel of the brakes, whether you like a spongier feeling lever or a harder lever. I prefer a very hard brake lever so I was able to set mine up to have similar feel in both levers. Typically with such a long cable run to the rear brake you'll have a spongier feeling rear brake than the front, but at least with the Speed Dial levers you can have similar brake lever feel, even if the stopping power is a little spongy because of the long run. You can get slightly better modulation by using a compressionless segmented housing, but they're pretty pricey.

  19. #294
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    Hi Velo Celt,

    thank you. this is very helpful. I am all sold on the BB7 but I am still wondering if it is worth spending another $50-70 more for a stronger hydraulic system? Any opinions? I think for all intents and purposes the BB7 should be strong enough, right?

  20. #295
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    gauguin - all you'll get from hydros is better modulation. Stopping power will pretty much be the same, especially if you spring for higher quality housing. Also, with hydros you'll need to get a longer hose for the rear, at least from what I've heard. The stock hose won't be long enough for the run to the rear brake. That means before you've even set up the brakes you'll be needing to drain and bleed them. Personally, I prefer the simplicity of mechanical discs. The other thing to consider if you have hydros is every time you remove a wheel to patch a tube or something you need a special spacer to go into the caliper so the pads don't close up, preventing you from getting the rotor back in. With mechanicals this doesn't happen.

  21. #296
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    Agree with everything Velo Celt has said re hydraulics versus mechanical, much more simple. In the case of the special spacer, this is only required if you accidentally squeeze the brake lever whilst the wheel (and disc rotor) is out of the frame (caliper). If you do not squeeze the brake lever, the pads will stay in their original position, enabling you to get the wheel and rotor back in place. As a qualified bike mechanic, I work on hydraulic systems regularly, and I do not use a spacer. BUT, if you are concerned that you may accidentally squeeze the brake lever with the wheel out, by all means, get the spacer!

  22. #297
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    Yuba Quality Control

    I wrote in a previos comment that I'd be posting more about Yuba quality control. I've owned a version 1 blue 'tank' and now, a version 4. The quality control of Yuba manufacturing is improving, and I have to say that the Yuba is a great bike, it has enabled us to do many things that would have been impossible on most other bikes. They are tough, sturdy and cruzy to ride, and it is not easy to find another bike that will handle the punishing 130 kg cargo weight that we carry. The quality control issues that I list below, are simply for others to consider and check out. The distributor for Yuba here in Australia has been great, any QC issues we've had, have been quickly fixed with replacement parts.

    1) Frame

    The photo below shows the misalignment of the rear dropouts, on one of the V4's. The frame was replaced free of charge by the Yuba distributor in Australia. There are two spirit levels in this pic, one showing the floor level and the other the rear dropout level, from both a distance and above (spirit level bubble) shot. This bike also had front fork issues, one fork longer than the other, resulting in a skewed wheel.

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    2) Rims

    It is rare for most people to remove the rim tape from their wheels, unless, you are trying to work out why the rims have cracked around the nippless, or, because the rim tape needs replacing. What I found, once the rim tape was removed, is that the automatic spoke tension machine, used during manufacture of the Yuba rims, had damaged the outer wall and removed a big proportion of some of the nipple heads. Again, Yuba in Australia were more than happy to replace these, but since we were installing Velocity Cliff Hanger rims, we didn't take up their offer. Apologies for the blurred photo's below. You can though, see the rim damage and the Brass of the nipples heads, after the chrome coating has been chewed off, by the spoke tensioning machine.

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    This is not a 'complaint' post, Yuba have been very good in responding to these issues, but you might want to check out your own Yuba's, just in case......

  23. #298
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    Yuba Electric Assist

    Hi Velo Celt, yes that isa Cello on the back of my travelling companions bike! She's a Professional Musician / Composer who tours around Australia performing at venues. The black case on my bike is for my Mandolin, but I'm only just learning to play it so I'd call myself a 'hack' at this stage! The motor set up I designed and manufactured myself. It's a stock standard electric bike / scooter motor with a reduction gearbox. The gearbox and the cog ratios enable us to get the maximum torque out of the motor and a nice easy cadence. For the attachment of the motor to the seat post, I manufacture a metal plate for the motor base and this is then attatched to two 'Stauff' hydraulic hose clamps, which clamp around the seat post. Many years ago I worked in the hydraulic and pneumatic industry designing control equipment for manufacturing companies. The Stauff clamps are widely used for clamping hydraulic hoses and can withstand considerable forces (in many directions) without losing grip of the hose. They are UV stable, oil, petrol and harsh environment resistant, often used on offshore drilling rig applications. I came up with the idea to use them when I discovered that they are made in a size that perfectly fits the Yuba seat post diameter! An added bonus is that because they are made out of a plastic material, they do not damage the paint or steel tube when clamped tightly on.

    Most of the other drivetrain components, including the left hand crank cog, freewheel, bottom bracket bearing kit and adaptors, longer BB spindle, I sourced from Staton Inc in the USA. (link below). The motor chain tensioner I made myself using an old V Brake arm and a rollerblade wheel. A recess for the chain can easily be created in the wheel, by inserting a bolt through the rollerblade wheel bearing, inserting the bolt into a drill chuck, and whilst the drill is running, using a small sharp wood chisel, simply cutting a groove about 5 mm deep.

    Home

    Yep, the motorcycle mirrors have been great! No vibration, so you can see everything clearly and the left hand mirror is very handy when crossing motorway or highway on ramps! I can certainly understand though how they would be a pain when needing to carry your bike up a couple of flights of stairs!........

  24. #299
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    Rims for heavyweight touring

    Here in Australia we are pretty limited in choice of range when it comes to bike components, if you want anything decent, going overseas is the only choice. We had a limited time-frame for the Yuba builds outlined above, before we hit the road, and some components just had to be ordered locally to get everything done. The Velocity Cliff Hanger rims, were the best we could get at short notice, but they lasted only 3,500 km's, before this happened,

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-image.jpg

    The rear rims on both bikes split uniformly around the entire circumference on both sides, the only thing holding the rims together, was the rim tape.

    A number of factors caused this. The weight of the rig plus rider, the tyre pressures, ambient temperatures here in Australia, rim temperature due to braking, leading to an overall increase in temperature, which increased tyre pressure.

    We had been running our tyre pressures at pretty much max, due to our load, but when riding 4 to 5 hours per day, almost everyday, in hot conditions, and using the brakes, the air pressure inside the tube / tyre can increase enormously. This places considerable strain on the rims.

    So how did we fix it? Firstly by reducing tyre pressure. Secondly by fitting Ryde Andra 30 rims (although, as Velo Celt suggests, the Sun Rhino's would be equally as good). The good thing about the Ryde Andra 30's, is that they have an option for the spoke exit angle to be drilled specifically to suit the Rohloff internal geared hub, a big plus for us.

    We had to order them from Europe as there is no distributor for them here in Australia. At 735 grams each, they also weigh a lot, but they are built solid as. Here's the link.....

    Products | Ryde

  25. #300
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velo Celt View Post
    gauguin - all you'll get from hydros is better modulation. Stopping power will pretty much be the same, especially if you spring for higher quality housing. Also, with hydros you'll need to get a longer hose for the rear, at least from what I've heard. The stock hose won't be long enough for the run to the rear brake. That means before you've even set up the brakes you'll be needing to drain and bleed them. Personally, I prefer the simplicity of mechanical discs. The other thing to consider if you have hydros is every time you remove a wheel to patch a tube or something you need a special spacer to go into the caliper so the pads don't close up, preventing you from getting the rotor back in. With mechanicals this doesn't happen.
    Velo Celt,
    Sorry for the slow reply. Too busy arguing with car drivers here in Philly who park in the no stopping areas of bike lanes....

    I ordered a BB7 for the front and can't wait to install it!

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