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  1. #251
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    The StandAlone makes the bike quite stable, and level side-to-side. The parked bike does tilt back a bit (front wheel raised a couple inches) unless you have weight on the front (e.g. in a Bread Basket). With enough weight up front, the rear wheel will lift (and front wheel touch the ground) but the bike remains stable. At half the price of Xtracycle's kickstand, Yuba's StandAlone is a bargain. I do wonder how much weight it will support -- did the folks in North Carolina with that video of the 400-500 pounds of bananas use the StandAlone to keep the bike upright while loading it? If so, then you should have no worries about load in front of the wheel pushing down too much on the StandAlone.

    My complete included the deflopilator, and I like how it keeps the bars straight when the bike is parked. I have not tried to see how the front end would behave without it. It does seem to interfere a little bit with really low-speed tight turns (like trying to turn around when straddling the bike), but it's not too bad, and I think I would probably not want the front end to turn too quickly in those situations anyway.

  2. #252
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    During this season I had a front carrier attached to the fork and the handlebars. I unmounted it few weeks ago but I think this carrier could be too heavy for the deflopillator. Luckily I have also another front carrier which mounts to the frame.

    I see only one problem with the deflopillator - I park my bike in the apartment with the front wheel turned to the side (there is a limited space for the bike - just between one door and the wall). I think its not a good idea to have the deflopillator stretched all the time. Is it possible to easily release it from the frame/fork to turn the wheel to park the bike?

    Another possibility is to have the Mundo with the fork/handlebar attached carrier. Advantage of this is that bigger box can be mounted in front (I rode also with a 50 liter box in front), which is impossible with most of the frame mounted carriers - there would be a conflict when steering - handlebars would hit the box. Does somebody have this type of front carrier in combination with the StandAlone? How does it behave when parked? Does the use of the deflopillator make any sense?

  3. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    I see only one problem with the deflopillator ... Is it possible to easily release it from the frame/fork to turn the wheel to park the bike?
    No, it's not easy. The deflopilator kit basically puts eyelets on the fork crown and downtube, and the spring hooks into those eyelets. But the spring is under significant tension even when the fork is pointed straight, so it's not easy to undo the deflopilator by hand. If you wanted an undoable one you'd have to tweak it, and IMO probably ought to just build your own. Hey, it's just a spring. :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    Another possibility is to have the Mundo with the fork/handlebar attached carrier. Advantage of this is that bigger box can be mounted in front (I rode also with a 50 liter box in front), which is impossible with most of the frame mounted carriers - there would be a conflict when steering - handlebars would hit the box.
    Cable housing, too. And since it's frame-mounted, you can't hang panniers from Yuba's Bread Basket the way you can some fork-mounted porteur racks. So it's pretty limited in terms of the volume it can carry. But, especially with the liner, it's very handy and better for casual loads than some of the minimalist porteur racks that pretty much require you to bungie a separate bag to the rack if you're carrying anything small or floppy or that has straps, etc. I like that, even without the deflopilator, loads in the Bread Basket don't flop around when the bike is parked.

    With both fork and frame mounted front baskets, you need to think about headlight placement. With Bread Basket, I moved my battery-powered light out almost to the grips so that it would sit another inch or two higher and be less likely to be obscured by the front load. I'm considering mounting it on the front of the Bread Basket somehow.

  4. #254
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    My wife has had our 24 lb daughter in a Yepp Mini on the front of our Mundo (v4 frame) for about 7 months, but it's time to relocate her to the rear. We have a used Yepp Maxi EasyFit that I bought on Craigslist that I'm trying to install.

    I removed the bamboo deck from the rear rack and used two of those screws to secure the front of the Easyfit carrier to one of the cross bars on the rack. For the rear connections of the EasyFit carrier, I'm trying to use 2 of the "w-shaped" metal clamps (which I believe originally came with the Easyfit carrier) to clamp it to the side rails of the rear rack. Unfortunately, the clamps are not quite long enough and/or the slots in the Easyfit carrier are not quite wide enough to reach both side rails. By shifting the Easyfit carrier slightly to one side, I can clamp one side but not both.

    Has anyone else solved this problem? I got the clamps from a local Yepp dealer. Perhaps there are wider ones available or a newer Easyfit adapter would have slightly wider slots? Any ideas or suggestions are much appreciated! Thanks.

    Edit: you can see the clamp in Pic 2 of the Easyfit mounting instruction manual: http://www.yepp.nl/cms/files/Mountin...%20apr2012.pdf
    Last edited by DoubleEh; 12-30-2013 at 02:08 PM. Reason: Added link to Easyfit manual

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  6. #256
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    I have Yuba Mundo v4 with V-brakes. I want to replace them with (perhaps mechanic) disc brakes, but I don't have any experience with this type of brakes. Do you have disc brakes on your Mundos? Which brakes are the best choice for a longtail cargo bike?

  7. #257
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    brakes

    I had original V-brakes on my Yuba. After my frame cracked and I was sent a new frame from Yuba as a replacement, I used Avid bb5 mechanical disc brakes for about over a year. They were pain in the neck, since I had to fine tune them all the time. I ended up installing the cheapest Shimano hydraulic brakes with 180 mm discs and I did not have to tune them nor deal with them in any way for over a year. My bike is used every day by me and my wife to haul our kids (11 and 8, close to 170 lb together), shopping etc. We have no car and Mundo has already been on a 100+ mile ride in one day. My Yuba is a home-altered-NuVinci-hub-snowbike-tires-equipped bicycle you can see in my earlier posts.

  8. #258
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    Re: The Yuba Mundo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Jozo View Post
    I have Yuba Mundo v4 with V-brakes. I want to replace them with (perhaps mechanic) disc brakes, but I don't have any experience with this type of brakes. Do you have disc brakes on your Mundos? Which brakes are the best choice for a longtail cargo bike?
    Hi Jozo,

    I've been using Avid BB7 mountain versions and are happy with them. You need to use 180mm rotors for your front wheel. 160mm in the rear is fine but 180 is better. Also, please make sure you get the right adaptors for the calipers. I suggest call Yuba tech support and they will also give you info on the exact parts that you need to fit the brakes well. Thanks.

    FBJ

    Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  9. #259
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    Thanks for replies. I also asked Yuba tech support and now I have new mechanic Avid BB7 brakes on my Mundo.

    Rear brake:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8791_1.jpg

    Front brake:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8793_1.jpg

    Whole bike:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8796_1.jpg

  10. #260
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    Jozo - are you pleased? Did you need any special parts, shims, etc? Is that a 180 in back?

  11. #261
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    I think disc brakes is the next investment for my Mundo.
    Look like a great way to go!

  12. #262
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    peterw_diy: The brakes were mounted in the bike shop, so I don't know exact details but yes, there are some shims and the seller looked like it was a lot of work to successfully do it (some shims, small recentering of the wheel and so on) . But they managed it and breaking is now better than before Both rotors are 180 mm.

    One more pic:
    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dscf8794.jpg

  13. #263
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    Planning to look into project Yuba Mundo again on my end after finishing building up my electric Giant bike.

    Probably gonna end up selling the Giant (minue e bike kit) after this semester of university and get a Mundo... the Giant blends into the other bikes at uni, riding a Mundo is going to cause too much attention, of course after I graduate next semester I can finally ride a Mundo.

    So I have encountered a few things in my early stage of research.

    Is the bottom bracket 68mm? Been looking at some Sunrace & Shimano BB cartridges, hoping these are threaded the same as what's on a Mundo?

    The steerer/headset/fork, is it a 1 1/8" threadless system on a V4 (4.3) frame?

    I'm gonna be a cheapskate and get Shimano tourney components for the drivetrain since it will be electric for most part anyway, may go with Altus if I have spare change.

  14. #264
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    Re: The Yuba Mundo Thread

    yes, v4 has threadless 1 1/8 fork. Shimano BB will also work. Go mid drive if you can for your electric assist, best for cargo bikes.
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  15. #265
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    Last Wednesday I bought a new two leg stand and the Bagutte for my Mundo. The stand is great, much better than the former with one leg. Now I can comfortably sit on the rear deck while waiting for my wife I planned to buy the Gogetters bag but they were not on the stock so I took the Baguette. This one is smaller but for everyday commuting is satisfactory for my needs. But I think I will buy also the bigger one for longer trips .

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-heavypedals_1.jpg
    New equipment in front of Heavy Pedals bike shop in Vienna.

    The Yuba Mundo Thread-dunaj_1.jpg
    On the bank of the Danube in Bratislava.

  16. #266
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    looking good Jozo. The bags for perfect. I think they are good sized for daily commute.

    Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  17. #267
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    New question here. Tubeless?

    I'm dreading the day I get a flat on the Mundo.

    Any suggestions for going tubeless w/ the stock rims?
    Ghetto tubeless or Stans kit work?

  18. #268
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    A flat on the rear is a pain. I carry two wrenches (front and back use different sized nuts) taped under the rear seat pads. I also got slime tubes--they've worked really well. Pulled several thorns out of the tires and I could see the holes seal up instantly.
    我的镀铬光泽的冰柱一样,我骑在镇附近在我的低骑手自行车

  19. #269
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    ghetto tubeless will work. Use the 1" wide gorilla tape from Home Depot. They are nice and thick. STANS goop, tubeless valves and you are good to go.
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  20. #270
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    I got a flat tire on the rear wheel two weeks ago (first time on this wheel after 18 months I have it). The repair was not much more time consuming than on normal bike. The only one problem was that I didn't have the right size wrench but luckily I had variable size wrench. It was a little bit unconfortable (the wrench was constantly widening) but worked.
    Perhaps I should replace my tires, they look like they deserve it

  21. #271
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    I am very interested in getting a Yuba for hauling my kids to school and elsewhere, and for running to the grocery store. Because I have two kids I am driving more than riding now, and it is driving me crazy. How does the bike handle with 2 kids on the back (90 and 45 pounds)? I tried another brand's bike and once the kids were on the back the bike spontaneously did a wheelie and both kids fell off. Once I got on I could keep the front wheel down but it was very difficult to control with that much weight on the back.

    Also, how does it handle on windy trails? I'm not planning to do any real mountain biking, but we have a lot of dirt paths in town here and some of them wind around trees, and up some short hills.

    Thanks for any advice!

  22. #272
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    it's great, you will not regret getting one. my kids are heavier and the bike still handles great. One thing I like the most is the frame stiffness. Heavy loads and heavy kids don't affect the handling, doesn't feel flexy.
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  23. #273
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    So the Yuba plan is still on the back of my head after many months. I now have an idea especially with my nephew and niece which want to come out for a bush bike ride with me. They're like 4 and 5, so the Mundo with extra rear seats should work for me.

    Anyway, I have a Mongoose Tyax MTB which I never use these days ever since going motorbike... so I suppose I'll move everything from that frame over to the Yuba frame (minus Suntour XCT forks) and it should work on the flat gravel trails with some fat tyres...?

    No electric assist however. Just pure pedal power so I actually LOSE weight.

  24. #274
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    My kids are 9 & 11 so a bit heavier than yours too. It's definitely a little shaky when starting up from a complete stop. Easy going for sure on straights. Gets a bit tough when doing sharp turns. I'm about 150, so it would probably help if I had more weight up front. But I havent noticed any problem with wheelies...

    Quote Originally Posted by wwrivers View Post
    I am very interested in getting a Yuba for hauling my kids to school and elsewhere, and for running to the grocery store. Because I have two kids I am driving more than riding now, and it is driving me crazy. How does the bike handle with 2 kids on the back (90 and 45 pounds)? I tried another brand's bike and once the kids were on the back the bike spontaneously did a wheelie and both kids fell off. Once I got on I could keep the front wheel down but it was very difficult to control with that much weight on the back.

    Also, how does it handle on windy trails? I'm not planning to do any real mountain biking, but we have a lot of dirt paths in town here and some of them wind around trees, and up some short hills.

    Thanks for any advice!

  25. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by wwrivers View Post
    I am very interested in getting a Yuba for hauling my kids to school and elsewhere, and for running to the grocery store. Because I have two kids I am driving more than riding now, and it is driving me crazy. How does the bike handle with 2 kids on the back (90 and 45 pounds)? I tried another brand's bike and once the kids were on the back the bike spontaneously did a wheelie and both kids fell off. Once I got on I could keep the front wheel down but it was very difficult to control with that much weight on the back.

    Also, how does it handle on windy trails? I'm not planning to do any real mountain biking, but we have a lot of dirt paths in town here and some of them wind around trees, and up some short hills.

    Thanks for any advice!
    I've carried two adult men on mine and it handles great. totally stable and getting going wasn't bad.

    I also use mine for trailworks sometimes and will load it up with tools and ride it on the trails, so handling is great. It's a long bike, so obviously tight turns can be an issue and pushing it up hills with the side loader rails is tough, as they get in the way. I'm thinking about taking off the side loader rails and just using a big bag on each side. It's just tough to store this bike in my limited space.

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