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  1. #1
    Beastrider
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    From the "ARE YOU SERIOUS" arena.....

    Surely this CAN'T be serious........I certainly wouldn't trust this while wheeling downhill at any rate of speed.....

    Wireless bicycle brake, a prototype on an exciting mission
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  2. #2
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    computer science professor at Saarland University, confirmed the reliability of his wireless bicycle brake through mathematical calculations
    I see the problem right there

  3. #3
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    I see the problem right there
    I agree wholeheartedly!!!!!
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  4. #4
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    No thank you!! I'll keep my cables.

  5. #5
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    Therefore, his research group examines the brake prototype with algorithms that normally are used in control systems for aircraft or chemical factories. As a result, they found out that the brake works with 99.9999999999997 percent reliability. "This implies that out of a trillion braking attempts, we have three failures," Hermanns explains and concludes: "That is not perfect, but acceptable."
    Unless on one of those three failures you shoot through an intersection and get nailed by a truck.

  6. #6
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by dm1333 View Post
    Unless on one of those three failures you shoot through an intersection and get nailed by a truck.
    And that just happens to be ***YOU***
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  7. #7
    wants a taco
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    Too much complication for a bicycle but that does not seem to be their intended purpose, sounds like they are just using the bicycle as a way to test his electronics that will be used to control train and airline brakes. I highly doubt they have much intention to put this system into production for bicycles.
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  8. #8
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by nubcake View Post
    Too much complication for a bicycle but that does not seem to be their intended purpose, sounds like they are just using the bicycle as a way to test his electronics that will be used to control train and airline brakes. I highly doubt they have much intention to put this system into production for bicycles.
    I'm not to sure about that. Why on earth would you test something on a bicycle is it's to be used on some sort of a train? The braking systems on both are completely different from the start. On a bike they are cable or hydraulic and on a train they are air brakes. They all work in different ways.
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  9. #9
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    The article is pretty clear that they are using bikes to test it because of the simplicity of a bike, before eventually testing on a more complex system like a train or plane.

    They aren't testing the brake technology in terms of disc vs rim vs air, but rather the triggering mechanism.

    I think the implication that this is eventually planned for trains is pretty clear.

    I'd also be willing to bet that most cable brake systems, including the ones on any bike, have a higher failure rate than 3 / trillion. If you were to average all bikes, and not just well maintained and set up bikes, I bet the average failure rate on cable brakes is higher by several orders of magnitude.

    To put it in perspective, assuming there are roughly 7 billion people on the planet, every person on the planet would have to squeeze one of those electronic brake levers almost 50 times to generate 1 failure. (Assuming my rusty math is roughly correct - 1T/3/7B=x)

    I'd risk those odds ...

  10. #10
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSSasky View Post
    The article is pretty clear that they are using bikes to test it because of the simplicity of a bike, before eventually testing on a more complex system like a train or plane.

    They aren't testing the brake technology in terms of disc vs rim vs air, but rather the triggering mechanism.

    I think the implication that this is eventually planned for trains is pretty clear.

    I'd also be willing to bet that most cable brake systems, including the ones on any bike, have a higher failure rate than 3 / trillion. If you were to average all bikes, and not just well maintained and set up bikes, I bet the average failure rate on cable brakes is higher by several orders of magnitude.

    To put it in perspective, assuming there are roughly 7 billion people on the planet, every person on the planet would have to squeeze one of those electronic brake levers almost 50 times to generate 1 failure. (Assuming my rusty math is roughly correct - 1T/3/7B=x)

    I'd risk those odds ...
    I am sure that you are correct with the cable failures. However, I wonder what the odds are in BOTH cables failing at exactly the same time. That would give you one brake to slow down and stop.

    Whereas, with a wireless system, unless you have one wireless for each brake, your failure would be on BOTH brakes at the same time.

    I have found with my simple wireless computer that when I get close to a cell phone tower, or something with a strong electrical signal, it has a tendency of doing some rather strange things, like not working correctly.

    A simple quote from Jurassic Park says it best..."Oh, God, we are in the hands of engineers"........

    Sure, the article does say that they are considering this for trains. But you can bet good money that someone will try and produce a version for bicycles, motorcycles, and cars. I am not THAT thrilled at the prospect of putting that much faith into a wireless system.....

    Now, please excuse me, I have to restart my wireless router due to a weak signal.....
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  11. #11
    wants a taco
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    It could easily be set up so you have a separate system for each brake, the problem with bicycles is powering an electronic system, you would either need to carry and recharge batteries or generate your own power, both are big problems on bikes geared towards performance.

    I know train brakes are air but I would imagine their goal is to either change the system entirely or at least change whatever controls the brakes between the cars. For trains I could see this being very beneficial as leaks in air lines is much more likely to happen than the wireless signal failing, it would also probably simplify connecting cars as well.
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  12. #12
    Beastrider
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    Quote Originally Posted by nubcake View Post
    It could easily be set up so you have a separate system for each brake, the problem with bicycles is powering an electronic system, you would either need to carry and recharge batteries or generate your own power, both are big problems on bikes geared towards performance.

    I know train brakes are air but I would imagine their goal is to either change the system entirely or at least change whatever controls the brakes between the cars. For trains I could see this being very beneficial as leaks in air lines is much more likely to happen than the wireless signal failing, it would also probably simplify connecting cars as well.
    With the railroad constantly evolving and changing there is always the possibility. After all, they DO use radio-controlled power in the yards now. But that's a limited application.

    As for the air brakes. True they DO have a bad tendency of leaking. I know that hydraulics WERE attempted a number of years ago but, it was the extreme leaking that put that in the "fail" area.

    One thing that has remained pretty consistent is the way that these actually operate. True they ARE mostly air operated. But there is still the old wheel and chain to set them for yard and/or emergency operations. Going to be interesting to see just how fast American railroads take to this system, if it ever actually works.
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

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