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  1. #1
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    What do you use your cargo bike for?

    I searched the cargo forums and I hope this isn't a redundant post.

    I'm wondering what everybody uses their cargo bike for. Does anybody actually use it at their place of employment?

  2. #2
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    My cargo bike gets used for just about everything, from road rides, to grocery runs, commuting, etc. I have used it at work, but not really for that much. Carried a box of krill once, but that was about it. Trying to talk my workplace into buying some Worksman trikes to replace our golf carts...
    Last edited by backcountryeti; 10-21-2011 at 08:04 PM. Reason: spelling edit

  3. #3
    Down South Yooper
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    Everything, kids, groceries, kids, Chariot puller, cruiser, mtb, touring. I do about 20 miles a day on mine with at least 1 35 lb kid, and about half that with two 35 lb kids.

    So far, it has done everything I've asked of it.

    Plum
    This post is in 3B, three beers and it looks good eh!

  4. #4
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    I don't have a cargo bike, but I do use a Bikes at Work 64a trailer. If needed, I have an old Bell child trailer I can attach to the BAW using the Burley hitch set-up.

    Last week, I had 50 lb kid on the 40 lb BAW trailer with 200 pounds of sand followed by the 20 lb Bell trailer and another 200 pounds of sand, for a total of 510 pounds behind me. It was heavy.

  5. #5
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    J Hopper,
    Whoa, cool. How does braking work with that kind of load?

  6. #6
    NONDURO
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    Normal operating weight (before the weight of humans is added to the equation) is roughly 90lbs., as 30lbs. of the weight is in the lead-acid batteries for the truck/marine airhorns, whatever a TopPeak JoeBlow floor pump weighs, 8lbs. or more for the 65mm wide Surly Large Marges shod with 26"x2.5" Maxxis Hookworms, Wideloaders+Freeradicals, another 3lbs.+ for the three 14.8V Li-Ion battery packs for the lighting systems, another 1lbs.+ or so for the additional 14.8V Li-Ion pack for the 20oz. of Bosch Volvo horns, spare tire, spare tubes, two patch kits, 3lbs. or so of tools, I think the kitchen sink might be stuffed in there somewhere as well. Sort of a Swiss Army Bike of sorts I suppose.

    When I am hauling my two boys, figure the added weight of a 2006 Burley Piccolo (with itís own 2lbs. of Li-Ion battery packs for custom rear lighting) plus a 48lb. kid, plus my stokerboy who weighs roughly 39lbs.Ö oh, and I am somewhere between 173-180lbs. (havenít looked at a scale in probably 4 years).
    QUOTE from MTBR.COM: You have given out too much Reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roosters View Post
    J Hopper,
    Whoa, cool. How does braking work with that kind of load?
    Braking is slower than normal, though I'm confident because I have Hayes hydros on that bike. They've been solid and reliable. I would not want to take that same load down a hill with rim brakes, though.

    I am surprised at how much the fork blades flex backwards when I apply the brakes. Because of this, I'm always sure to use the back brake as well (where I might not if I wasn't towing the trailer) to try to distribute the stress. I also try to minimize stopping by slowing down way ahead so I can roll through where I otherwise may have had to stop (ie, waiting for a pedestrian to cross, a red light, etc).

    I keep my speed in check, don't rush over the bumps, anticipate where I need to slow by braking early, and things seem to be just fine.

    I've had 400 pounds on the BAW trailer alone. In a separate attempt, I've had 200+ pounds in the Bell trailer (probably close to 250 pounds). So, theoretically, I could haul over 600 pounds + 60 in trailer weight with this set-up. I do find the easiest gear, 22 front by 32 rear, is barely adequate when the road inclines with 500 pounds behind me.

    Now, if only I had a Yuba Mundo, I would be able to haul 1000 pounds... now that would be something!

  8. #8
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    1000 pounds, that's crazy! My old motorcycle weighed less than that and it was a pain to lift if it fell over. That kind of load would have to be balanced well.
    When you're weighed down and going slow, is the gyroscopic effect of the wheels diminished?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roosters View Post
    1000 pounds, that's crazy! My old motorcycle weighed less than that and it was a pain to lift if it fell over. That kind of load would have to be balanced well.
    When you're weighed down and going slow, is the gyroscopic effect of the wheels diminished?
    Personally, I don't notice any problems with the wheels - gyroscopic effect or otherwise.

    I typically balance the load over the rear axle, so there's very little tongue weight. This means even when I have a very heavy trailer (300+ pounds), I still have regular balance. When I come to a light, I try to trackstand until the light changes. Most of the time, I have to put a foot down, but that's the case when I'm not pulling a trailer as well.

    I've posted a few pictures here and there in the bike forums thread, here.

  10. #10
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    My cargo bicycle the Big Dummy will be use for grocery runs and take a few camping trips with and to just ride it for the fun of it.And I get to bring it home after Thanks Giving weeeeeeee.Its been a lot of work building it the way I had to but it's going to be worth it I think I can't wait until I can start to use it ever day.I need to use it all I can the money I have in it lol way way to much for a bicycle but it's mine.
    :-)

  11. #11
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    We don't have a car so I often use my Yuba Mundo to haul groceries, packages and the kids to and from school, soccer practice, etc. A couple times a month, I give tours of Yokohama and Kamakura using Carryme folding bicycles. I use the Mundo to haul the bikes and meet the customers at their hotel/train station.

  12. #12
    Church of the Wheel
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    Kona Ute is used for commuting, hauling stuff, touring, pulling kiddo in trailer, etc. It is a reasonable car substitute for 80-90% of things that would otherwise be done with a car. Love it.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  13. #13
    bikewrider.blogspot.com
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    I use mine for. . .

    . . . science.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What do you use your cargo bike for?-dscn0937.jpg  

    What do you use your cargo bike for?-dscn2395.jpg  


  14. #14
    wants a taco
    Reputation: nubcake's Avatar
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    Kid hauling (this time to the park)


    Exploration


    The occasional grandma hauling...she thought the bike was cool and wanted a ride.


    Errands


    It is also my commuter which is used almost every day, unless I have a ton to do when I get home or have to be somewhere just after work.
    Just another cycling blog...
    The Long Way Home

  15. #15
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    Commuting, including hauling my youngest to the babysitter, errands, grocery runs, family logistics, day trips and touring (once this past summer, but planning more this year) and recreational rides. I just swapped from drops to h-bar and put on knobby tires. I'm thinking some non-technical, or easy technical mountain biking will soon follow.

    My job requires no travel, but I could see using it for other occupations. I also converted our kid trailer to a flat hauler and have used it to carry some larger things, including a wounded mountain bike.
    Searching for Biketopia

  16. #16
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    My Cargo Bike is my car replacement. I use it for my daily commute to work and family errands. I have a custom electric assist on my Yuba, so it makes it faster to travel with cargo from point A to point B.

    Some friends I know are purists, so they are not really fond of using an electric motor, they say it's for lazy people.

    My take is, whatever works for you is pretty much to your advantage. Electric assist is an option that makes my commute quicker, saves me tons of money (no fuel expense), keeps me outdoors and get a good sweat going when I am in a mad rush (you still need to pedal if you want to go faster past the legal speed limit with an electric assist system).
    Mid Drive is the future of e-cargo bikes.

  17. #17
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    I use our Big Dummy for my in town car. Groceries and errands, although to be honest now that we have a tandem (for me and our blind DD) with a bob trailer and DS is 6 and very fast on his own bike we don't use it as much as we did when he was little. They like to pedal too.

  18. #18
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    nubcake cute, cute baby!

  19. #19
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    So far Ive used mine for riding with my son, but no actual errands. I'm hoping to get some in soon but just getting used to the bike as Ive had it a week

  20. #20
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    Current uses:

    Carting the kid to/from pre-school. Taking same kid to the park with her Strider bike stowed in the freeloaders. Grocery shopping. Riding to/from friend's houses. Social riding. Random errands. Easier trail riding.

    Planned uses:

    Carting both kids to/from pre-school (once the younger one is walking). Taking kids to the park with their bikes stowed in the freeloaders. Camping trips. Commuting to/from work. More trail riding.

    Since I got a Big Dummy in October, I've ridden my old Surly 1x1 two times in about 600+ miles of riding. I've found I am actually faster and more efficient on the long bike.

  21. #21
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    My old bike shop told me a BD would not make a good touring bike at all it would be to heavy and it was just not be a good bike to just ride.Well I hate to tell them I ride mine all over the place just for fun and it rides great.I am going on a small trip on it just as soon as summer time hit again.And it will be loaded up.I did a little test ride with it loaded up with the stuff I will take on my trip and it was very easy to go up the hill around here but I have 22,32,44t chainring and a 11-32 cassette on the rear its pretty good for my self.Who said you have to use a cargo for a cargo bike they are just fun to ride and if you find something you want while you are out riding you can bring it back with you that's the cool part.

  22. #22
    Beastrider
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    I use mine as an every day commuter. Going to appointments, grocery shopping, and generally just enjoying the ride.....
    Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.. Ferris Bueller

  23. #23
    Longleaf Bicycles
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    I'm loving having a cargo bike again.

    We used to have a Work Cycles bakfiets for carrying our kids when we lived in downtown Wilmington, N.C. A year ago we moved to an old farm in New Hampshire. We live at the top of a steep hill near Mt. Mondanock. To get to town you descend 450 feet in 2.2 miles. And to get home you get to climb them. There was no way the bakfiets was going to make it around here.

    I finally built up a Big Dummy last week and use it for carrying kids (of course). If is also used to take orders to the post office. And I've found it works very well as a logging rig. I can throw my chainsaw and tools on it and get out to the woodlot faster than using a tractor.



    Longleaf Bicycles: Handbuilt wheels. Dynohub lighting systems. Custom assembled bicycles.

  24. #24
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    wow, what tyre pressure do you use at the back?

  25. #25
    Longleaf Bicycles
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    Quote Originally Posted by photosheikh View Post
    wow, what tyre pressure do you use at the back?
    You're probably overestimating the weight I'm carrying.

    I don't adjust the tire pressure for logging duty. The tools, chainsaw, etc probably weigh about the same amount as my kids, who are the other cargo load I carry, so the same psi works for both. With 2.35" Big Apples I've been using 22psi on the road and 17psi off road.

    It is under half a mile from the garage to the area I'm currently cutting on our woodlot, so I'm not traveling far.

    Sadly, I'll need the tractor and trailer when the time comes to bring the wood in.
    Longleaf Bicycles: Handbuilt wheels. Dynohub lighting systems. Custom assembled bicycles.

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