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  1. #1
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    cargo bike diy add-ons

    I'm about to head home from vacation and take hold of and build up my recently arrived yuba mundo frame.

    I didn't buy any of the accessories that help you carry a load, as i think I can do it myself for cheaper, if not necessarily as elegantly.

    I'm compiling examples of people who've done this before me. Please add to the list if you see something innovative that I've missed.

    The simplest option is to strap some bins to the side. The main drawback of this option is that the bike is very wide even when you're not carrying anything. You could probably put one bin inside another and put them on one side or on top of the deck to narrow the bike, but its still more cumbersome than some alternatives.

    Just having a big bag and some bungie cords to keep it on is fairly simple.

    home-made runningboards seem like a good idea regardless of what other solutions are employed. I'm wondering what the best material is. plywood seems somewhat heavy, maybe other materials are available for re-use such as discarded and damaged plastic bins.

    The sidecar is pretty interesting too, but turns would be a potential issue, especially off-camber.

    Things I expect to carry: my bmx bike to the skatepark and dirt jumps, groceries, hand and powertools for trailwork.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cargo bike diy add-ons-cargobike.jpg  

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    cargo bike diy add-ons-cargobin.jpg  

    cargo bike diy add-ons-sidecar-detail-xtracycle.png  

    cargo bike diy add-ons-bag-runner.jpg  

    cargo bike diy add-ons-container-bike.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images    

  2. #2
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    another idea is to build platforms and then use a bit of fabric and some webbing to create an adjustable "bag", i.e., the bottom and back of the bag would be hard and built into the frame. The outermost and front and back would be fabric that keeps things from falling off, but can be pushed down flat for carrying larger loads. This picture has something that looks somewhat like I'm describing, though I think its a full extracycle bag. From the angle the picture was taken at, it looks the same as what i'm describing
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  3. #3
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    Hadn't seen that Xtracycle Sidecar before (prob already discussed in the forum) ... it looks pretty slick. I'd never let my 7yo surf the deck on my Big Dummy, but I think I'd let him do it on that thing.

  4. #4
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    Going the diy route on a Sun Cargo I just got off of Craigslist. I will post some pics soon. I think the side platforms are a must, it just gives a lot more options.

  5. #5
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    That's a lot of stuff to fit on a bike, does it make it hard to control?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBerry3rd View Post
    That's a lot of stuff to fit on a bike, does it make it hard to control?
    Things can get out of hand quickly. If you put too much weight behind the axle, the bike is hard to even push, as it wants to constantly wheelie.

    Even with only 30lbs, I notice that if I try to drop flat off a curve (both wheels hitting ground at same time) the bike tends to tip if I don't work hard to keep it vertical.

    I also quickly realized riding along with two pallets on the back that if I crash going 20+ mph, things are going to get bad quick!

    At the same time, I've given rides to two drunk friends at the same time (on the rear rack) and I was surprised how stable it was.

    I've been doing trailwork and bringing along a pointed shovel, flat shovel, pick-axe, and hard rake. Pushing the bike up steep hills takes a lot of work, but I'm also surprised at the amazing traction when all that stuff is above the rear wheel.

  7. #7
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    I added bar-ends at the very end of the v-rack on my freeradical, and put some wooden rods on them.
    It looks like a handlebar, but reversed. It's kind of cool and useful for the second kid to hang on the bike.
    Last edited by tractopelle; 09-18-2012 at 02:29 AM. Reason: Added pic

  8. #8
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    I've wanted to carry lumber on my bike for awhile and still haven't managed to do it. I need to build for my yuba the equivalent of the xtracycle long loaders. As far as I can tell these essentially just cause the long load to be situated at an angle that is compatible with your feet and pedals. Here's a crazy load!
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by anotherbrian View Post
    Hadn't seen that Xtracycle Sidecar before (prob already discussed in the forum) ... it looks pretty slick.alexcycles.com I'd never let my 7yo surf the deck on my Big Dummy, but I think I'd let him do it on that thing.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    Things can get out of hand quickly. If you put too much weight behind the axle, the bike is hard to even push, as it wants to constantly wheelie.

    Even with only 30lbs, I notice that if I try to drop flat off a curve (both wheels hitting ground at same time) the bike tends to tip if I don't work hard to keep it vertical.

    I also quickly realized riding along with two pallets on the back that if I crash going 20+ mph, things are going to get bad quick!

    At the same time, alexcycles.com I've given rides to two drunk friends at the same time (on the rear rack) and I was surprised how stable it was.

    I've been doing trailwork and bringing along a pointed shovel, flat shovel, pick-axe, and hard rake. Pushing the bike up steep hills takes a lot of work, but I'm also surprised at the amazing traction when all that stuff is above the rear wheel.

  11. #11
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    i was thinking about cat litter containers

    i was thinking about using cat litter containers (plans all over the internet) for cheap hauling of light weight stuff (bread, milk, etc.). has anyone actually tried this on an MTB ? how is the bike for turning, stopping (always a good thing!), and starting off from a standing stop?

    jim.

  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    Als I see is red x's
    '96 Specialized Hard Rock
    '11 Origin 8 700CX
    '13 On One Inbred
    '14 Surly Troll

  14. #14
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    red x's too

    i must be missing something as well - maybe i really do need a 12-year old standing along side as i surf the internet, just to interpret (and occasionally sigh at my fumblefingers),

    x's mean ? anyone?

    jim.

  15. #15
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    It means the pics didn't load
    '96 Specialized Hard Rock
    '11 Origin 8 700CX
    '13 On One Inbred
    '14 Surly Troll

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