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  1. #1
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    Am I asking too much???

    i posted this over in the commuting section but thought it would fit better in here:

    so im just getting into commuting/truck biking/being car free around town and winter has had me thinking, i will be going to school in idaho in a few weeks and wanted to build something up thats a good all around student bike, something that i could use to get to class, cruse to a friends house and go back and forth from work and get errands done. I picked up what I think is a 1992 GT Talera for $5 at a secondhand store (simular to this):
    It was a pretty good deal and I had everything laying around to fix it up, and got it in full working order, my plan is to put an xtracycle kit on it, do the home made spiked tires and slap a front fender on it... again since im new to this, would that be a good plan? would it work well and be a good all around or should i do 2 builds?

    I'm just looking for opinions and weighing it out... sorry if its a dumb question.
    what would be a good full coverage front fender option? Does the xtracycle kit have a rear fender or does the deck on top act as one?

    thanks!

    (sorry for the huge pic its the only one i could find)

    Edit: also has anyone commuted during the winter on there cargo bikes, how do they handle, so i think what im asking in all of this is would you do it?

  2. #2
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    Nice deal

    Cool bike, Probably perfect for xtracycle. Post pics when done.

  3. #3
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    Slapping an Xtracycle on a bike makes it a great winter commuter. The added length and the different weight distribution makes the bike handle better in slick conditions than a normal bicycle. It sorta' makes the slipping and sliding seem like it's happening in slow motion so you have more time to react.

    The snapdeck will keep water and grime off your back but full coverage fenders are still a real good idea and there are many manufacturers and styles to choose from.

    If you're going to school in Boise, then I know there are multiple bike shops that can help you with the fender choice.
    Duct tape makes you smarter.

  4. #4
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    Sounds like a totally doable plan! Just get the gnarliest lock you can find as bike thieves thrive in college towns, and your ride will stand out as an extra cool one. Full coverage fenders are a smart move. Many good ones out there, e.g. Planet Bike, etc.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  5. #5
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    I ride my Big Dummy year long as my car replacement. It is very reliable. The studded tires feel very secure in the winter riding season, the dynohub light kit is great in the sub zero morning commute, and the mud flaps that I screwed onto my full coverage fenders have added at least a few hundred miles to my chains life.

    I think what you are planning sounds like a great idea. For fenders the planet bike ones are nice, but the built in flaps aren't quite as long as I'd like them. I have SKS Chromoplastic fenders on my BD, and I had to put 8" flaps on. It sounds like you're thinking about the right stuff, and as luck would have it you'll have plenty of room for your lock in the freeloaders.

  6. #6
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    hey guys thanks for all the suggestions and support... the plan is first to get the bike ready for winter commuting and then to get the longtail kit as soon as funds allow it. will post pics as soon as i am actually around the bike, seeing as it is already in idaho.

  7. #7
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    best thing about turning that into an extracycle is you won't have to deal with the pain in the ass 990 rear brake ever!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    best thing about turning that into an extracycle is you won't have to deal with the pain in the ass 990 rear brake ever!
    I was going to mention that, but it looks like the X will be down the road, so the U brake is staying for a while.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtrops View Post
    I was going to mention that, but it looks like the X will be down the road, so the U brake is staying for a while.
    yeah the u break back there is killing me, it all plastic and pretty much junk but it will have to do for a little bit.

  10. #10
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    Reputation: FastFix's Avatar
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    My first X build up was based on a GT Allterra I found @ a thrift store. I liked it a lot. as for a front fender i used an old cruiser fender from any old beach cruiser. It was nice and wide and bolted right up. I had it in my parts stash but they are readily available at any bike co-op if you have one locally. Good luck on it I used the stock brakes but they were canti's front and back. You may find a set of those there as well.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrwplsn View Post
    yeah the u break back there is killing me, it all plastic and pretty much junk but it will have to do for a little bit.
    I recommend putting some koolstop brake pads, preferably with some of the salmon colored compound on at least part of the pad, on the u-brake.

    Also make sure you've got the optimal angle. Typically, by running brake pads that are effectively thicker you get better leverage. Take a good look at the lever arm where the cable attaches, and make sure that an imaginary spoke coming out of the pivot goes through the cable anchor, and adjust the pad spacing until the cable and the imaginary spoke are as close to perpendicular as possible, err slightly such that as the angle changes when you actuate the brake, the perpindicular happens as the pads contact the rim.

    are more succintly:
    for the front: Adjusting Traditional Center Pull Cantilever Bicycle Brakes
    for the back: Adjusting Cantilever "U-Brake" Bicycle Brakes

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