Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 40
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,483

    New question here. The absolute best and safest way to transport a Baby

    On a Bicycle that is...

    Well we have a new baby and is getting that time when we can take her on bike rides so we are looking for the best way to carry her on the bike, so far we are partial to the "Stem" mounted chairs (forward mounted) because they provide great "Contact" with the baby plus the bars will protect her in case of a fall, but I'm sure they also have shortcomings (endo's, stoppies, holes on the road, etc)

    In any case we need help figuring out what is best, Money is no object at this point and No we don't want a big dummy just to carry a 15pound baby.

    Ps: Trailers maybe safe but they have issues for the baby (Psychological) so we prefer to stay away from them for now.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    207
    How about a cargo bike- 2 wheels for speed or 3 wheels for stability

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,266
    You have a new baby and it has Psychological problems being in a trailer?

  4. #4
    Cars Are Evil
    Reputation: Vermont29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,113
    We're car-free. I did a lot of research for transporting our now 10-month old daughter. We're getting a Big Dummy.

    The stem-area seats look comfy, but the seat back doesn't extend past the child's shoulders, so they are susceptible to neck injuries. I've scraped and bent enough brake levers to know that area can be vulnerable in a crash.

    Trailers shouldn't be used for carrying children where cars are present. I'm not going to ride around with my child's head at bumper height. For bike-paths they seem safest since the child is so close to the ground.

    A standard-wheelbase bike with a child seat on the back isn't stable enough.

    Bakfiets seems like the safest, IF the roads are relatively flat and predictable. For our country roads with gravel, snow, and ice I was worried about the handling of a bakfiet. We're not planning to ride in bad weather, but 6 months of the year if we want to get out it means dealing with at least a little bit of slick conditions. Sizing was also an issue, since I'm 6'4". None of the bakfiets that I've seen are available in anything but "one size fits most". I was worried about being in a good position for climbing hills.

    15 pounds seems a little small in regards to neck strength. Be careful and be sure the seat provides enough support.

  5. #5
    Cars Are Evil
    Reputation: Vermont29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,113
    Quote Originally Posted by asphalt_jesus View Post
    The last thing you need to worry about with the cargo bikes is handling. They go straight and turn okay. But, mostly go straight no matter what.

    As long as you are on two wheels instead of three, slick conditions will always be an issue. I could see things going badly for three wheels too!

    It sounds like you don't have much experience with cargo setups. When they are loaded, pretty much the last thing to worry about is proper leg extension. You worry about planting your feet. That you are a big guy doesn't matter so much.

    You have conflicting goals. Don't try to satisfy all of them.

    I don't know what the obsession is with acquiring a Dutch version of a Worksman. Front Load Heavy Duty Tricycles from Worksman Cycles Widely available in the U.S. and will last several lifetimes.
    Where are you located and what is the local terrain and climate?

    Trikes aren't an option for us, our roads are too narrow.

    I regularly pull 100 pounds on a BOB.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    369
    Quote Originally Posted by Vermont29er View Post
    .. I was worried about the handling of a bakfiet. We're not planning to ride in bad weather, but 6 months of the year if we want to get out it means dealing with at least a little bit of slick conditions.
    It sounds like you don't have much experience with cargo setups. The last thing you need to worry about with the cargo bikes is handling. They go straight and turn okay. But, mostly go straight no matter what.

    As long as you are on two wheels instead of three, slick conditions will always be an issue. I could see things going badly for three wheels too!

    OP has conflicting goals. Don't try to satisfy all of them. When they are loaded, pretty much the last thing to worry about is proper leg extension. You worry about planting your feet. If you have hills, think twice about braking too.

    I don't know what the obsession is with acquiring a Dutch-like version of a Worksman. Front Load Heavy Duty Tricycles from Worksman Cycles Widely available in the U.S. and will last several lifetimes.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    369
    Quote Originally Posted by Vermont29er View Post
    Where are you located and what is the local terrain and climate?

    Trikes aren't an option for us, our roads are too narrow.

    I regularly pull 100 pounds on a BOB.
    Isn't a BOB a trailer? That's different still.

    I'm in Southern California. Sold/maintained a bunch of worksmans years ago. I used one then. I used it in hills. The customers bikes were industrial use. Board flat for them.

  8. #8
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    one of these with baby in the front.
    http://www.neighborhoodnotes.com/upl...8C98F77539.jpg

  9. #9
    Cars Are Evil
    Reputation: Vermont29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,113
    Quote Originally Posted by asphalt_jesus View Post
    Isn't a BOB a trailer? That's different still.

    I'm in Southern California. Sold/maintained a bunch of worksmans years ago. I used one then. I used it in hills. The customers bikes were industrial use. Board flat for them.
    Yes, a BOB is a single-wheel trailer. So I'm very familiar with moving a heavy load while balancing it. I can't imagine trying to do it while crammed onto a bike designed for someone much smaller.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    993
    I have a Big Dummy with a Wee-Ride on it (so in the "stem mount" style") for the youngest, and a stoker bar on the back for his older brother.

    While I enjoy the Wee-Ride, I do find it is an awkward fit after a couple miles (I'm 6'1+ with a size L which has a pretty long TT) these days. I mtb'd with the Wee-Ride more than rode the road, and it didn't seem so bad at the time.

    If I wanted something safer/as utilitarian, I'd get a long wheelbase Dutch-style cargo bike with the cargo area in the front (i.e. WorkCycles Cargobike Long)



    A full on car seat could easily mount in the cargo area to carry an infant ... mount the quick release base and you could pop it in/out as needed. Doesn't vik have one of those (as well as a BD)?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Desert Walker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    356
    I am thinking a boxbike. Maybe a cetma largo with custom box or Bakfiets. The big box offers a very versatile platform for installing seats and baby carriers and I think the box offers some great protection from stuff like stray bikes and sticks and bushes and stuff. You could even put a little rain fly over it. Also they have a commanding presence so moterists may be less likely to try to squeeze around you. Good luck with your search.

  12. #12
    Down South Yooper
    Reputation: Plum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,009
    All these methods have their advantages and drawbacks. Trailers are nice because the kid is out of the elements, enclosed, fully supported and not really susceptible to rider crashes. The trailer is not flip-proof, but it doesn't happen often. They can sleep in there, put their gear in there, toys, books, etc, so you may get more miles in. The kids are a little farther away, so conversations are harder, but not impossible.

    Kid seats are good for smaller kids, but larger heavier kids can be a problem. Rider crashes are a concern for the kid, weather can be an issue. Conversations are easy. No suspension (unless it's a full sus bike). Shorter seats (like the front mounted ones) may have head support issues if the kid falls asleep. Weight limitations are lower for front mounted seats, higher for rear, mounting conflicts based on the frame, room to haul kid supplies, etc.

    Cargo bikes are the most versatile, but also the biggest investment. A big dummy with a pea pod would be very useful, able to grow with the kid, and rides pretty normally. The kid isn't going to be 15lbs forever.

    Bakfliets (sp?) may be more suited to easy cruising, but the kid compartment is more enclosed/encased than the dummy. Might be just as rider/terrain friendly as the dummy, but they don't have that reputation. I can't compare directly, haven't ridden one.

    I have a dummy, a chariot, a burly piccolo that mounts on the dummy and a 3 and 5 yo. They can both ride on the back, both in the chariot, one on the piccolo, one on the dummy, etc. I don't have the pea pod chairs, just stoker bars (1 set for each rider), seatbelts and foot pegs. If the weather is nice, they like to ride on the back and on the piccolo. If it's colder or raining, we get out the chariot. I did 18 miles today with 1 kid, and about 9 miles with both, using the chariot as it was pretty wet and chilly.

    I'd say the best way for you depends on what your goals are. If you want to be out all day, gt a trailer so the kid can catch a nap and you can haul their gear. If you want to ride them down to the park at the end of the block, get a mounted seat. If you want to buy 1 setup that will grow as the kid grows, cargo bikes can do that.

    Options abound, pick yer poison.

    Plum
    This post is in 3B, three beers and it looks good eh!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    144
    in the netherlands they advise not to use the bike as transport form UNDER 6 months...
    not even with a maxi cosi baby carrier. now my daughter is over 6 months, i bought a mounting bracket for the maxicosy. bracket needed to be adapted and is screwed to deck of extra cycle.
    Afbeelding
    basically i did not know that the maxi cosy carrier also fits to the flight deck adapter as sold for the extracycle
    https://s-static.ak.facebook.com/rsr...sNJNwuI-UM.gif

    FWIW the peopod 3 is nothing more then a rebranded Yepp mini
    http://www.fietskinderzitje.nl/colle...pp-minihttp://
    price level is about 80 to 100 USD.....overhere

  14. #14
    Cars Are Evil
    Reputation: Vermont29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,113
    Quote Originally Posted by constantijn13 View Post
    in the netherlands they advise not to use the bike as transport form UNDER 6 months...
    not even with a maxi cosi baby carrier. now my daughter is over 6 months, i bought a mounting bracket for the maxicosy. bracket needed to be adapted and is screwed to deck of extra cycle.
    Afbeelding
    basically i did not know that the maxi cosy carrier also fits to the flight deck adapter as sold for the extracycle
    https://s-static.ak.facebook.com/rsr...sNJNwuI-UM.gif

    FWIW the peopod 3 is nothing more then a rebranded Yepp mini
    http://www.fietskinderzitje.nl/colle...pp-minihttp://
    price level is about 80 to 100 USD.....overhere
    The Peapod 3 is the same as a Yepp Maxi Easyfit, not the Mini

    I'd love to see your setup but the image from Facebook doesn't work. Try this TinyPic - Free Image Hosting, Photo Sharing & Video Hosting

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    144
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net...52148965_n.jpg
    another try

    since the picture, i moved the bracket to the front of the deck as it felt very flexy with the weight in the back

  16. #16
    Cars Are Evil
    Reputation: Vermont29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,113
    Quote Originally Posted by constantijn13 View Post
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net...52148965_n.jpg
    another try

    since the picture, i moved the bracket to the front of the deck as it felt very flexy with the weight in the back
    Interesting setup, looks comfy.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,483
    Quote Originally Posted by Vermont29er View Post
    Interesting setup, looks comfy.
    Now that makes a lot of sense, specially with the car seat moved forward, great idea.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    18
    personally i like the kids up front so i can watch and talk to em....

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    10
    I view any handle bar related kid carrier as chancing instant death or serious injury.

    I had a wheel get stuck in a large crack in a side walk. Bent my front wheel beyond use AND bent my handle bars!!!!! My bike flipped forward - luckily I was wearing my helmet and my hand/elbow took most of the impact. I was going around 10 mph when it happened.
    Thank goodness my kid was in a trailer.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    869
    The basket bike/bakfiets style cargo bikes worry me tremendously due to the difference in front wheel traction between fully loaded and unloaded. If you've got 100lbs in the basket, I'm sure they handle nicely. But if you've got 15lbs in the basket and you turn on loose or slippery surfaces, I'm skeptical that front wheel is going to hold on.

    I just ordered a Yuba Mundo frame (yubaride.com). I'm hoping this is the last word for me in terms of hauling biotic and abiotic passengers.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    17
    if an additional wheel is ok, a trike maybe? no issues of toppling over.

  22. #22
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    trikes are very tippy, i think...

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    869
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    trikes are very tippy, i think...
    that's for damn sure!

    unless you don't ever turn while moving, of course.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    4
    Low slung recumbent trikes arent tippy at all and are great for transporting cargo. Seriously, look into it. Bikes such the terratrike cruiser. I would reccomend it over the lower rover model, as it is much less tippy. I honestly cant tip mine unless i REALLY try.

  25. #25
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    Quote Originally Posted by Carbon_hardtail View Post
    Low slung recumbent trikes arent tippy at all and are great for transporting cargo. Seriously, look into it. Bikes such the terratrike cruiser. I would reccomend it over the lower rover model, as it is much less tippy. I honestly cant tip mine unless i REALLY try.
    Pics! Bonus points and pos rep if you include a doll wrapped in a blanket in the spot where you would put a kid.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •