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  1. #1
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    Thru axle adapter for the rear? Work with me for a second...

    I have a Lefty, which you know comes with a bit of hauling hassle. In another thread, I got some good ideas, e.g. the Hurricane, Fork Up, a 1UpUSA tray... The Fork Up, so far, is the best bet - 'cause it lets me throw the bike on my friends' racks too. It just requires the removal of the front wheel... and the front caliper.

    But what about this... The same approach - a thru-axle adapter - but for the rear? The Scalpel has a thru-axle out back too. The upside here, is not having to mess with the brake caliper.

    Picture this:


    Only a bit wider (to match the I.D. of the frame) and a bit taller (to let the derailleur clear the roof).

    The questions rattling around my head are:
    1. Does this already exist (I'm 2 days into the Lefty/thru-axle world)?
    2. Am I missing something - why this wouldn't work?

    The initial hassle - modifying a Fork Up or fabricating from scratch - would be off-set by years of easier transporting.

    Thanks!
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride are usually slow.
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  2. #2
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    I don't see why this wouldn't work I guess. the chain and derailleur might make installing the bike onto the roof/axle a bit of a pain.

    What would be involved in removing the lefty wheel/axle to use it in a traditional or modified adapter? I've never really looked at a lefty but I assume the brake rotor/caliper interface is a problem?

  3. #3
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    You're right. Because the wheel comes off to the side, not down, the caliper-rotor interface is the issue. You've got to loosen the caliper enough to clear the rotor. Not a big deal - just 30-45 seconds with a 5mm allen. But, more time than it'd take to remove/replace the back wheel. Plus, something about loosening, retorquing those bolts over and over... probably fine... I guess.
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride are usually slow.
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  4. #4
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    Believe me, it's going to be a lot easier to remove the front wheel on the Lefty then your idea of using an adaptor for the rear. If you believe that having an adaptor on the rear you can use a Pugsley Fork Up which has 135mm spacing, even comes in an offset model, but since you said your rear axle is a thru axle, I bel I eve that spacing to be 142.5mm. I developed all of the Fork Up models, the Lefty is very easy to use.

  5. #5
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    Sounds like it could work. Give it a try for sure...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Jeff View Post
    Believe me, it's going to be a lot easier to remove the front wheel on the Lefty then your idea of using an adaptor for the rear. If you believe that having an adaptor on the rear you can use a Pugsley Fork Up which has 135mm spacing, even comes in an offset model, but since you said your rear axle is a thru axle, I bel I eve that spacing to be 142.5mm. I developed all of the Fork Up models, the Lefty is very easy to use.
    Jeff, I wouldn't argue for a second that the Fork Up for the Lefty could be any easier to use. It's an extremely well designed and well made piece. If it weren't for having to remove the brake caliper every time it's used, I wouldn't even be contemplating this. Remember too that when you remove the wheel, you've got to somewhat snug up the brake caliper to the fork - so you don't lose a bolt and the caliper doesn't swing around during transit.

    So the process is...
    1. Loosen bolts on caliper
    2. Move caliper out of way of rotor
    3. Loosen bolt on hub
    4. Remove wheel
    5. Replace caliper
    6. Finger-tighten the bolts to caliper
    7. Attach Fork Up adapter to Lefty

    Compared to using the (nonexistent) back wheel thru-axle adapter...
    1. Remove thru-axle
    2. Drop wheel out
    3. Attach adapter to frame

    In the mean time, I'll be using the Left Up - I bought one today...
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride are usually slow.
    Roadies who don't mountain bike are usually d***s.

  7. #7
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    Well if you have a drawing with some dimensions i can put together a rear adapter for you. I have a lathe and a stick welder. It won't be beautiful but it'll work.

    It would be steel so you'll have to paint it or something to keep it from rusting.

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