Subaru XV Crosstrek

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  • 10-31-2013
    kustomz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LennieM View Post
    Looking to replace my current Honda Fit. Curious as to whether or not you can fit a 29er standing up inside like I can with the Fit? Actually i can do two 29ers inside the Fit… One is enough though. Will this work in the XV Crosstrek or do I need to consider a Forester?

    Is this with the front wheel on? Pic please!
  • 10-31-2013
    LB412
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    Is this with the front wheel on? Pic please!

    It might fit if you lay on the side. Definitetely if you remove the front wheel
  • 10-31-2013
    LennieM
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    Is this with the front wheel on? Pic please!

    In the Fit? With front wheel OFF its easy. Right now I have a Medium 29er and a road bike both inside with both front wheels off. If I could just get the 29er inside the Crosstreck inside standing up with the front wheel off I'd be happy. The Fit is actually perfect for me except I'm bored of it...
  • 10-31-2013
    XJaredX
    With cargo mat in, from trunk to top of hatch opening is 28-28.5 inches.

    From the backseat folded down (with rear seatback protector) to ceiling, it's about 29-30 inches depending on if you're in the center or off to the side.

    Keep in mind, the B-segment subcompacts like the Fit usually have extremely high ceilings to imply greater room than they actually have, which benefits transporting a bike that is standing up, whereas the C-segment compacts don't have as high a ceiling.

    So you might be better off moving to the Forester. Same fuel economy in the Forester, sort of similar pricing.
  • 11-22-2013
    newfangled
    So we've been doing some winter driving with the new Crosstrek - snow/hardpack/ice on the roads, and temps between -10C/14F and -25C/-13F.

    My wife drives it much more than me, and she finds it "floaty". In the passenger seat I can feel it noticeably yawing back and forth, but I can't really replicate it when I'm driving (and I'm trying not to be too judgy about her driving).

    When we got the crosstrek we thought about getting winter tires, but figured we'd see how the geolandars worked first. And now the initial impression seems to be "not so great." I'm genuinely pretty surprised at how weird the car feels on roads that aren't even all that bad. I've driven with way worse tires, and never felt this happen before.

    I was wondering if anyone has played much with the tire pressures? I was thinking of dropping the pressures a bit, but saw that the manual recommends increasing winter pressures to 38psi front and 37psi rear.
  • 11-22-2013
    gravitylover
    I just brought my tire pressure up because it felt squishy when it was in the low 20's the other day (and my tires have 33k on them) and the car feels much tighter now. I didn't run them higher last winter and didn't have a problem but they were brand new. I had pretty good luck with them in the snow last winter, not great but I didn't feel the need for a winter set.
  • 11-22-2013
    newfangled
    Yeah, we're still under 10,000km. I just did a cold reading and they were a little below 30, so I bumped them up to about 35. My wife made it through last winter with pretty worn tires, so she's no stranger to this.
  • 11-22-2013
    Harold
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    So we've been doing some winter driving with the new Crosstrek - snow/hardpack/ice on the roads, and temps between -10C/14F and -25C/-13F.

    My wife drives it much more than me, and she finds it "floaty". In the passenger seat I can feel it noticeably yawing back and forth, but I can't really replicate it when I'm driving (and I'm trying not to be too judgy about her driving).

    When we got the crosstrek we thought about getting winter tires, but figured we'd see how the geolandars worked first. And now the initial impression seems to be "not so great." I'm genuinely pretty surprised at how weird the car feels on roads that aren't even all that bad. I've driven with way worse tires, and never felt this happen before.

    I was wondering if anyone has played much with the tire pressures? I was thinking of dropping the pressures a bit, but saw that the manual recommends increasing winter pressures to 38psi front and 37psi rear.

    Interesting. Driving conditions here haven't been all that bad yet. Maybe a slightly slippery morning at worst. Any overnight snow has so far melted quickly as soon as the sun comes out. I may consider upping tire pressure, also.
  • 11-22-2013
    newfangled
    It's weird because I drove it a few times this week and I can kindof tell what she's talking about - but as a passenger today it was clearly a problem. But watching her drive it's not like she's doing anything weird. We're going straight down a fairly clear street doing 60kph/35mph and the car will just twist a bit. Neither of us have had awd before, but I don't think that's the issue.
  • 11-22-2013
    SS Hack
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    It's weird because I drove it a few times this week and I can kindof tell what she's talking about - but as a passenger today it was clearly a problem. But watching her drive it's not like she's doing anything weird. We're going straight down a fairly clear street doing 60kph/35mph and the car will just twist a bit. Neither of us have had awd before, but I don't think that's the issue.

    Auto or manual? They seem to behave differently. All our manual Subarus blast down snowy roads even with bold tires
  • 11-22-2013
    newfangled
    Auto. It's a strange problem though, because it plows through stuff without issues and stopping is fine too. It's when cruising down winter streets that look like they shouldn't be a problem that this weird yaw thing happens.
  • 11-22-2013
    gravitylover
    Now I know what you're talking about. Yeah I had the same "problem" last year and it drove me nuts. I really do think it's the tires (pressure shouldn't be the issue, it's the tread pattern) but didn't try anything different last year and may not be able to afford to get a dedicated winter wheelset this year either.
  • 11-22-2013
    newfangled
    Glad I'm not crazy. :)

    Edited to add:

    Found a thread about my issue: XV yaw (lateral movement) with wind and ice
    And strangely, on a worldwide forum the two other people who are complaining are both from northern Alberta like me, and probably got their cars from either my dealership or the other one that's in town.

    I was thinking about telling my wife to try turning TC off. And also getting the alignment checked at the first oil change - although we haven't done anything that would have messed it up.
  • 11-24-2013
    gravitylover
    I think it's the tires. My FIL has a '13 Forester with the same tires and it does the same thing. Keep in mind that's the previous generation Imp platform and has a way softer suspension so the only thing that's the same is the rubber. I don't think TC/spin control off will make a difference, alignment maybe but I don't think that's it either. Remember these tires are "softroad" specialists and as such have a really soft sidewall so my guess is there's a fair bit of deflection on uneven surfaces and at speeds over about 20mph that deflection should cause the car to jiggle and dance. My tires are reaching the end of their life cycle though so if the money gods smile on me soon they will be replaced, better chance that I end up with a second fatbike in the stable first :winker:
  • 11-24-2013
    newfangled
    That's great info on the forester.

    I don't think the traction control has anything to do with it, but I am going to see if I can get a freebie alignment check from the dealer. If the alignment doesn't help then we'll try new tires. We'll have snow on the roads until may, so I'd like to solve this.
  • 11-24-2013
    carverboy
    Checking alignment is a good idea. Last winter My first driving a used Forester, the car scared the dickens out of me! Ive had plenty of winter driving and subaru experience.
    This car drove significantly worse than even rear wheel drive cars I'd owned!
    My mechanic after test driving was certain the awd was bad.
    I took it in for an alignment and turned out a rear tire was way out of alignment causing the" Exorcist " like handling.
  • 11-25-2013
    PerfectZero
    I wouldn't be surprised if the tires were at least partially to blame. I imagine the tread compound on the stock tires is pretty frozen at those temps.
  • 11-25-2013
    XJaredX
    If there was massive lateral movement that was enough to trigger the stability control, the VDC light would be flashing while it was correcting. In other words, if that light isn't flashing during this movement, turning off VDC won't affect it.

    I am pretty sure with the advent of VDC that none of the newer Subarus (except the STI) have limited slip rear diffs. I know my 01 Forester did and the ass would wiggle up a snowy hill from it.

    The Yokohama Geolandars do suck in snow and cold temps. But someone in that linked thread said they had a car on Hakkas that did the same thing.
  • 11-25-2013
    Eazy_E
    Could it be the fact that the manuals use a viscous coupling and the CVT uses that multi-plate transfer clutch thing making it feels different?
  • 11-26-2013
    gravitylover
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    If there was massive lateral movement that was enough to trigger the stability control, the VDC light would be flashing while it was correcting. In other words, if that light isn't flashing during this movement, turning off VDC won't affect it.

    Yup the light does flash sometimes when it happens. Probably just as well that the car is taking care of it for me because my reaction would probably be to give it a bit more go and steer into it rather than the car cutting power and helping itself to straighten out. Unfortunately drifting on an icy crowned road is not good so the way the car handles it is probably for the best. That said, I would rather have tires that cut through the slop and track straight.
  • 11-26-2013
    Eazy_E
    I've driven mine a fair bit on snow, on road and off road, and I haven't noticed any problems. In fact, every time I take it offroad, I respect it more and more. These cars and damn, damn capable off road. I was on some unmaintained Forest Service roads with enough snow on them that the front end was shoveling and it was just chewing through it with no problems at all. Symmetrical AWD for life, son.
  • 11-27-2013
    pimpbot
    Wuh wuh WUT?!?

    Subaru CrossTrek Hybrid? Sweet!!

    Subaru XV Crosstrek | The New 2014 XV Crosstrek

    Weird... is it me, or does the Hybrid get worse gas mileage than the 2.0 CVT CrossTrek at 25/33 MPG? Maybe it has a ton more power with that electric motor torquing away when needed.

    *edit*

    Okay, it gets the same mileage on the freeway, but better in town (by EPA ratings). 29/33 for the hybrid. On paper, it basically looks like exactly the same engine with an electric motor boost for a bit more horsepower and a bit more torque, and a bit of gas saved off the line to get the truck moving. How many other hybrids out there actually have AWD? I can only think of the Toyota Highlander.
  • 11-27-2013
    Silentfoe
    Old news.
  • 11-27-2013
    Eazy_E
    I get better than 29 MPG in the city with a manual transmission. I honestly don't know what orifice the EPA pulled it's fuel economy ratings from. I'm about 3 MPG lower on winter gas, but if I wanted to actually get EPA numbers, I'd have to drive 90 on the highway and completely flog it in the city. I mean I'd have to beat it like a rented horse.

    Hybrids are mostly a scam, and this is no different. I hope Subaru makes insane money off them, but you'll never see me in one.
  • 11-27-2013
    Zirkel
    1 Attachment(s)
    Premium 5-speed (w 14,000 miles), Curt hitch, Kuat Core rack.

    Attachment 850436
  • 11-27-2013
    Jayem
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    I get better than 29 MPG in the city with a manual transmission. I honestly don't know what orifice the EPA pulled it's fuel economy ratings from. I'm about 3 MPG lower on winter gas, but if I wanted to actually get EPA numbers, I'd have to drive 90 on the highway and completely flog it in the city. I mean I'd have to beat it like a rented horse.

    Hybrids are mostly a scam, and this is no different. I hope Subaru makes insane money off them, but you'll never see me in one.

    The newer EPA ratings are actually for just that, douchebag american driving. They take into account higher speeds and more aggressive shifts/revs.

    Although I generally find people's "average" mileage ratings to be pretty far off, or not taking into account things that significantly affect the "average", you won't see a lot of difference from a hybrid on the highway obviously, and depending on your driving style, possibly not too much in the city, but again depending on your driving, especially with an auto, you might see a significant difference. Re-capturing energy in the from of braking IS in the future and it IS what's making some of the latest supercars so fast. Being able to accelerate out of a corner that much faster because you captured some of your brake energy is a huge advantage, which can also be used to improve your mileage and not burn gas. I'd say hybrid technology is here to stay for a long time, just some of the hybrids out there are not worth it, while others live up to the hype pretty well.
  • 11-28-2013
    VTSession
    Hybrids are generally a scam (unless its a Porsche 918). You want better gas mileage? Get a diesel. Its just unfortunate that more diesels are offered in the U.S.
  • 11-28-2013
    Silentfoe
    Re: Subaru XV Crosstrek
    I got my worst gas mileage with this setup. 3 bikes on the roof, 2 on the trailer and a full trailer load. Plus 5 people. Seen here at the Slick rock trail head. 19mpg. Carrying as much as my F 350 ever did and still with better mpg.
  • 11-30-2013
    PerfectZero
    Impressions of my Premium XV after 200 miles...

    Good:
    - Reports of it being underpowered are overblown imo. Obviously not a sports car or even a sporty car, but I've had no problems passing on the freeway or whathaveyou, and its reasonably fun around town. I suspect there's more fun to be had but I'm trying to keep it below 3500 rpm for the break-in.
    - Despite this the engine has a satisfying growl to it. Downshifting is fun again!
    - Seems to coast forever when you let off the gas. I'm sure low drivetrain friction is one secret to the mileage.
    - Handling is great and surprisingly spry.

    Bad:
    - Road noise. Loud enough so that people I'm talking to over bluetooth can here it when I'm on the freeway.
    - I'm not a car stereo guy and even I notice the (stock) stereo sucks.
    - Deadpedal is a little too small for me.
    - Center armrest moves back every time I shift from 1st - 2nd or 3rd - 4th.
    - My bike just barely fits with the front wheel off. It is a XXL 29er though, so I'm not too concerned.

    Ugly:
    - The 5 speed shift knob is really hideous.

    No experience on the AWD. Mileage seems good but I dont think I have enough miles for an accurate estimate. Keep in mind I'm coming from a honda civic when I comment about power being adequate for me.
  • 12-28-2013
    newfangled
    Figured I should update my "floaty" crosstrek - we had the dealer do a wheel alignment a few weeks ago, and since then my wife has been much happier with the drive. 3 of the wheels were toed out .3deg, and the front cambers were both at .3deg. After the alignment everything was under .1deg.

    Since then we've done plenty of winter driving and there hasn't been any more weird yawing, so hopefully the problem is fixed.
  • 12-29-2013
    kustomz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    Figured I should update my "floaty" crosstrek - we had the dealer do a wheel alignment a few weeks ago

    Did you have to pay to make the car less floaty?
  • 12-29-2013
    newfangled
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    Did you have to pay to make the car less floaty?

    They wanted us to, but my wife raised a stink and got them to do it. The car had about 5000km on it, and had come straight off the boat to us. I've never had awd before and didn't realize it could have such weird side effects. Next time I'd definitely demand an alignment report as part of the pdi.
  • 12-29-2013
    pimpbot
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    Could it be the fact that the manuals use a viscous coupling and the CVT uses that multi-plate transfer clutch thing making it feels different?

    Is that true? The manuals don't have a center diff, but have a viscous coupling instead? I may have just been unsold.

    *edit*

    the subie site says it has symmetrical AWD standard on all models, with a vid showing torque being applied to all wheels equally. That doesn't sound like how a viscous coupling works to me. Or wait... is there a proper diff, but uses the viscous coupling as a limited slip?
  • 12-29-2013
    PerfectZero
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pimpbot View Post
    is there a proper diff, but uses the viscous coupling as a limited slip?

    Sounds like this is the case. From the "All Wheel Drive Encyclopedia"

    Quote:

    With manual transmission (both 5- and 6-speed):

    Full-time all wheel drive with 50/50 torque split front-to-rear under normal conditions. Viscous coupling locking differential in the center inside the transaxle case, activates when wheels start to slip. Torque apportion from 80/20 tro 20/80
    Electronically controlled clutch with the CVT apparently.
  • 12-30-2013
    Eazy_E
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PerfectZero View Post
    Sounds like this is the case. From the "All Wheel Drive Encyclopedia"



    Electronically controlled clutch with the CVT apparently.

    What he said.

    This car has only let me down one time. I was doing donuts in a field with a buddy and we went perpendicular into a rut that was about brake caliper deep. We went in one tire track, I saw the nose dive, the car shudders, I see the nose rise up, and we went into the next tire track. The nose dives, the car shudders violently, the engine stalls, loud scrape, all that. It was in a watery rut that almost went up to the door sills. We weren't really beached, but as I tried to get out, the back tires filled with mud, and they were just slick, and the fronts had nothing to grab onto.

    Once I smelled the sweet, sweet smell of burning asbestos, I decided that it was time to start making calls. Got a buddy to come out and pull us out, and we went through the trunk like McGyver looking for anything we could find to make a fire while we waited. Plastic grocery bags, Ziplock, paper cup, cardboard, motor oil, yep. Pro tip- 0W-20 works pretty well to help start a fire. I would have never driven out of there, and the tires were freezing into the rut anyway.

    My front bumper fascia got pulled out pretty far on the driver side, and my fog light got knocked out. I reached in the hole and just felt a muddy lump of ice. Oops. I've since decided to quit doing that stuff.
  • 12-30-2013
    SS Hack
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PerfectZero View Post
    Sounds like this is the case. From the "All Wheel Drive Encyclopedia"



    Electronically controlled clutch with the CVT apparently.

    Cool, now you get to replace clutches and have the added expensive and power lose of an automatic. Glad I'm a manual guy.
  • 12-30-2013
    Eazy_E
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Cool, now you get to replace clutches and have the added expensive and power lose of an automatic. Glad I'm a manual guy.

    Has that ever actually happened? I haven't heard of it. To me, it usually looks like most Subarus have the body rot out from under the still operational drivetrain.
  • 12-30-2013
    SS Hack
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    Has that ever actually happened? I haven't heard of it. To me, it usually looks like most Subarus have the body rot out from under the still operational drivetrain.

    Maybe not. I did put a clutch in a 5-speed once.
  • 12-30-2013
    pimpbot
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    Has that ever actually happened? I haven't heard of it. To me, it usually looks like most Subarus have the body rot out from under the still operational drivetrain.

    Well, what bugged me was that the old Vanagon Syncros had a viscous coupling instead of a center diff. You start slipping those wheels around offroad, and the viscous coupling starts to get cooked. That is a bit different, tho. In the case of the Vanagon Syncro, it was basically the front wheels and drivetrain (rear engine, rear drive unless wheels start slipping) would just windmill along (front diff, axles, propeller shaft) with the car as it cruised down the freeway. As soon as there was a difference in speed between the front and rear axles, the center viscous coupling would heat up, and then lock up to power the front axle. So, basically like a part time AWD that only fully kicks in after there is a loss of traction. A lot of the hardcore Vanagon folks replace the viscous coupling with a manually locking coupling, with a remote button that the driver turns on or off.

    I was concerned that this was a similar system.

    So, nice to see they are always driving all 4 wheels on the CrossTrek, and the viscous coupling is only there to act as a limited slip.

    As far as the clutch system goes on the CVT, Audi is basically doing the same thing on their current A4 and up Quattros. They dropped the Torsen center diff in favor of a traditional open diff and clutch lock-up. If it is anything like any of the other wet clutch systems, it should last a long time.
  • 12-30-2013
    Eazy_E
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Maybe not. I did put a clutch in a 5-speed once.

    Clutches are a wear item. I was talking more about the clutch pack in the automatic's differential going out.

    The only thing I've really heard going bad in a Subaru drivetrain are headgaskets in the older engines, wheel bearings(happens to all manufacturers), and CV joints(another wear item once the rubber dries out and cracks.) Other than that, I think the average Subaru will move under it's own steam until the body rots out.
  • 12-30-2013
    Jayem
    I have to wonder how much wear is really going on if the engine rev-matches (some do automatically now). I started doing that about 4-5 years ago and now it's the only way I can drive a manual. After doing that, it *seems* my clutch lasts forever, and in theory it should transfer the stress to the rings and cylinders, not that it's a completely good thing all the time, but also yanking the car into 3rd gear from 65 miles an hour is super-bad for the clutch and every mechanical piece connected to the drivetrain usually, unless you rev-matched it.
  • 12-31-2013
    Mr Pink57
    2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek Hybrid First Drive ? Review ? Car and Driver
    Looks like a hybrid version is coming, and some changes have been been to the overall vehicle.
  • 12-31-2013
    Ilikemtb999
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I have to wonder how much wear is really going on if the engine rev-matches (some do automatically now). I started doing that about 4-5 years ago and now it's the only way I can drive a manual. After doing that, it *seems* my clutch lasts forever, and in theory it should transfer the stress to the rings and cylinders, not that it's a completely good thing all the time, but also yanking the car into 3rd gear from 65 miles an hour is super-bad for the clutch and every mechanical piece connected to the drivetrain usually, unless you rev-matched it.

    Are you saying 4-5 years ago you didn't rev match? Yikes.

    The proper way to downshift has always been to rev match :lol:
  • 12-31-2013
    GSJ1973
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mr Pink57 View Post
    2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek Hybrid First Drive ? Review ? Car and Driver
    Looks like a hybrid version is coming, and some changes have been been to the overall vehicle.

    "A hybrid that is rated at 29/33 mpg on the EPA cycle (only 3 mpg better combined than that of its $3000-cheaper nonhybrid brother) doesn’t make a whole helluva lot of sense, either. Still, we anticipate that this model, with its 13-hp electric motor jammed into its CVT and a former spare-tire well now filled with an 0.6-kWh nickel-metal-hydride battery pack, will sell in places where the atmospheric and political climates favor a hybrid-badged Subaru (we’re looking at you, Boulder, Colorado). "
  • 12-31-2013
    Jayem
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ilikemtb999 View Post
    Are you saying 4-5 years ago you didn't rev match? Yikes.

    The proper way to downshift has always been to rev match :lol:

    Wow, that was helpful.
  • 01-01-2014
    Ilikemtb999
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Wow, that was helpful.

    And your post was? You basically said driving a manual car properly increases clutch wear :lol:
  • 01-01-2014
    Eazy_E
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ilikemtb999 View Post
    Are you saying 4-5 years ago you didn't rev match? Yikes.

    The proper way to downshift has always been to rev match :lol:


    They put syncros in the transmission for a reason.
  • 01-01-2014
    Jayem
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ilikemtb999 View Post
    And your post was? You basically said driving a manual car properly increases clutch wear :lol:

    Um, no, that's not the "proper" way to drive a car, that's a performance-way to drive a car. This isn't taught when people are learning to drive (by and large). Not only that, I was referencing it to the CVT's "clutch" and that if it had the appropriate systems, then maybe it won't really wear, at least like one would expect a clutch to. I've driven with lots of people too, very few rev-match.
  • 01-02-2014
    Ilikemtb999
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    So when downshifting you do what? Just let the clutch out without any throttle blip?
  • 01-03-2014
    Ilikemtb999
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    They put syncros in the transmission for a reason.

    Or learn to drive and don't prematurely wear out your syncros.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Um, no, that's not the "proper" way to drive a car, that's a performance-way to drive a car. This isn't taught when people are learning to drive (by and large). Not only that, I was referencing it to the CVT's "clutch" and that if it had the appropriate systems, then maybe it won't really wear, at least like one would expect a clutch to. I've driven with lots of people too, very few rev-match.

    Sounds like you know a lot of people who don't know how to drive a standard transmission correctly.

    What about vehicles without syncros like semi trucks? Are you saying when they rev match they're driving in a "performance" way? No, they're driving it properly. I feel sorry for any vehicle you or your friends drive.
  • 01-26-2014
    monkey2th
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Attachment 817693

    Here's our XV with the Torklift hitch and a Kuat NV.

    What size hitch did you install to accommodate the Kuat NV? According to the measurements I've seen you would have to cut the stinger to make the NV fit the 2" hitch without hitting the muffler while the 1.25" would fit no problem. The guy at Kuat would not tell me the distance between the tensioner mechanism and the end of the stinger on the 2" so I've been in limbo wondering what to get. I'd rather have the beefiness and flexibility of the 2" if possible. I would appreciate any info you have!
  • 01-26-2014
    Harold
    I used a 2" hitch and the 2" NV. I wanted the ability to buy the 2 bike extension in the future if I ever felt the need. There's VERY little clearance between the end of the stinger and the muffler on my XV. It's very tight in there, but it does not hit. Driving around town, it's not a problem. After I install the pin, but before I crank down the anti-sway, I pull the rack out to maximize clearance. Sometimes in rough areas, the muffler rattles on the stinger. I plan to cut a little bit off the end of the stinger on the Kuat rack to give me a little more clearance, but it's not a HUGE problem with city driving. I'd do it right away if I was driving on dirt roads to every trailhead, though.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by monkey2th View Post
    What size hitch did you install to accommodate the Kuat NV? According to the measurements I've seen you would have to cut the stinger to make the NV fit the 2" hitch without hitting the muffler while the 1.25" would fit no problem. The guy at Kuat would not tell me the distance between the tensioner mechanism and the end of the stinger on the 2" so I've been in limbo wondering what to get. I'd rather have the beefiness and flexibility of the 2" if possible. I would appreciate any info you have!

  • 01-26-2014
    monkey2th
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by IRONMAN1518 View Post
    Attachment 827204Ordered and installed the Torklift Ecohitch, fits very nice, out of sight and out of the way!1 Got my Kuat rack and mounted just one of the bike racks to see how it will look.

    What size hitch is that? Did you have to cut the stinger?
  • 01-26-2014
    monkey2th
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    I used a 2" hitch and the 2" NV. I wanted the ability to buy the 2 bike extension in the future if I ever felt the need. There's VERY little clearance between the end of the stinger and the muffler on my XV. It's very tight in there, but it does not hit. Driving around town, it's not a problem. After I install the pin, but before I crank down the anti-sway, I pull the rack out to maximize clearance. Sometimes in rough areas, the muffler rattles on the stinger. I plan to cut a little bit off the end of the stinger on the Kuat rack to give me a little more clearance, but it's not a HUGE problem with city driving. I'd do it right away if I was driving on dirt roads to every trailhead, though.

    Thanks for the quick response! That's been driving me crazy. One more question, how much do you think you'll need to cut to get the clearance you want? Thanks for the help...
  • 01-26-2014
    LB412
    I went with the Curt 2" hitch and the Kuat NV 4 bike rack. Also have the Kuat Vagabond X roof rack... Never know when you will need to haul 6 bikes. Very happy with the set up.
  • 01-27-2014
    Harold
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by monkey2th View Post
    Thanks for the quick response! That's been driving me crazy. One more question, how much do you think you'll need to cut to get the clearance you want? Thanks for the help...

    Less than an inch. The backside of the hitch is pretty close. The muffler does not move much.
  • 01-28-2014
    Silentfoe
    Re: Subaru XV Crosstrek
    At the Prospector trail head in St. George Utah
    Staging in Mesquite Nevada.
    Love this car.
  • 02-03-2014
    Neseth
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    Has that ever actually happened? I haven't heard of it. To me, it usually looks like most Subarus have the body rot out from under the still operational drivetrain.

    This won't happen with new subaru's, unlike many car manufacturers, subaru listens. All of the new subaru's like my 2008 have some sort of rhino lining sprayed underneath the paint, on the complete underside of the car, and about 2 inches up from the buttom on the sides of the car. If you kneel down and look at the bottom 2 inches of paint, you can see the the rough texture under the paint.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pimpbot View Post
    Well, what bugged me was that the old Vanagon Syncros had a viscous coupling instead of a center diff. You start slipping those wheels around offroad, and the viscous coupling starts to get cooked. That is a bit different, tho. In the case of the Vanagon Syncro, it was basically the front wheels and drivetrain (rear engine, rear drive unless wheels start slipping) would just windmill along (front diff, axles, propeller shaft) with the car as it cruised down the freeway. As soon as there was a difference in speed between the front and rear axles, the center viscous coupling would heat up, and then lock up to power the front axle. So, basically like a part time AWD that only fully kicks in after there is a loss of traction. A lot of the hardcore Vanagon folks replace the viscous coupling with a manually locking coupling, with a remote button that the driver turns on or off.

    I was concerned that this was a similar system.

    So, nice to see they are always driving all 4 wheels on the CrossTrek, and the viscous coupling is only there to act as a limited slip.

    As far as the clutch system goes on the CVT, Audi is basically doing the same thing on their current A4 and up Quattros. They dropped the Torsen center diff in favor of a traditional open diff and clutch lock-up. If it is anything like any of the other wet clutch systems, it should last a long time.

    You only need a locking center differential if you're going to be rock crawling. A locking center diff turns it into a 4x4 and is no longer an AWD car. You also have to keep in mind that the newer cars have braking limited slip on all 4 wheel as well. This helps move torque around as needed. My car is fantastic in the snow, it's a manual and does truly start off as 50:50 split. Unlike most of subaru's competitors that start off at 90:10 split, which have a center multi-plate clutch which has a tendency to lower engine power to save the center clutch from burning out. Viscous coupling won't burn out, so far as i know.

    We also have a 2011 rav 4 AWD, it's only about 150lbs more than the subaru and it doesn't quite go up hills anywhere near as well as the subie. The AWD is not symmetrical, even with the AWD Lock button pressed, it just can't seem to muster up enough torque to the rear. The AWD system is just a tacked on setup to a FWD system, and makes serveral turns off the flywheel to get to the rear driveshaft. Whereas the subaru is designed from conception to be AWD with it's boxer engine, where the flywheel is facing the rear, and the transmission is designed to inherently be unbiased with it's output of power. It simply just works, and works well. Going up our hill, the subie just scurries up without much fuss, the Rav4 struggles to get up. At first i thought it was the tires, but after buying the same tires, i realized it's the AWD system.
  • 02-04-2014
    BlackCanoeDog
    :) gotta love winter...








    Canada Edition 2013 DGM Crosstrek Sport MT
    WeatherTech Floor Mats
    Cargo Bay, Rear Seat Back, and Bumper protectors
    Splash & Mud Guards and 3M Clear Bra
    OEM Trailer Hitch / 7pin wire harness
    Yakima Rail Grabbers, bars, and Aero Winglet
    Yakima Big PowderHound ski racks
    Yakima Holdup hitch mount bike rack
    currently on Bridgestone Blizzak winter tires
  • 02-07-2014
    ranier
    Yesterday, I drove home a '14 Premium with sunroof trading in my Honda Fit. My first foray into the Subaru world. The ride and driving experience as much better than the Fit. Got a great deal on my trade, got the car well below dealer cost and they even threw in rear spoiler.

    Now to decide on a trailer hitch and maybe darker tint on the front side windows. Pretty excited, my first new car since I bought my Frontier back in '99. I literally drove that til it died and plan to do the same with the Crosstrek!
  • 02-07-2014
    trek7100
    Congrats on the new purchase. Photos? Can't wait to hear your reviews on it. Subaru has been suggested to me, they're not real popular in my area tho. How did you decide on the Crosstrek? What about Forester, Outback, or Impreza? Did you get a MT or auto?
  • 02-10-2014
    pimpbot
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Neseth View Post
    This won't happen with new subaru's, unlike many car manufacturers, subaru listens. All of the new subaru's like my 2008 have some sort of rhino lining sprayed underneath the paint, on the complete underside of the car, and about 2 inches up from the buttom on the sides of the car. If you kneel down and look at the bottom 2 inches of paint, you can see the the rough texture under the paint.




    You only need a locking center differential if you're going to be rock crawling. A locking center diff turns it into a 4x4 and is no longer an AWD car. You also have to keep in mind that the newer cars have braking limited slip on all 4 wheel as well. This helps move torque around as needed. My car is fantastic in the snow, it's a manual and does truly start off as 50:50 split. Unlike most of subaru's competitors that start off at 90:10 split, which have a center multi-plate clutch which has a tendency to lower engine power to save the center clutch from burning out. Viscous coupling won't burn out, so far as i know.

    We also have a 2011 rav 4 AWD, it's only about 150lbs more than the subaru and it doesn't quite go up hills anywhere near as well as the subie. The AWD is not symmetrical, even with the AWD Lock button pressed, it just can't seem to muster up enough torque to the rear. The AWD system is just a tacked on setup to a FWD system, and makes serveral turns off the flywheel to get to the rear driveshaft. Whereas the subaru is designed from conception to be AWD with it's boxer engine, where the flywheel is facing the rear, and the transmission is designed to inherently be unbiased with it's output of power. It simply just works, and works well. Going up our hill, the subie just scurries up without much fuss, the Rav4 struggles to get up. At first i thought it was the tires, but after buying the same tires, i realized it's the AWD system.

    Well, exactly. Relying solely on the brakes to stop a spinning wheel is just not enough, IME. The ABS systems just can't clamp down on a spinning wheel that hard to redirect torque to the rest of the wheels. You get maybe a 10% torque transfer at best. That is why some sort of diff locking is needed, like a viscous coupling to limit the difference in spin (as the viscous fluid heats up, it creates more drag in the clutch plates), a clutch pack operated by a servo, or something like that.

    The new Audis (a4 and above) use an open diff with a 50:50 or 60(rear):40(front) biased open diff with a clutch pack to completely lock it up. Older Audis use a Torsen center diff to achieve the same thing. A torsen is purely mechanical. It works like a regular diff, but instead of traditional gears to transfer the torque, it uses worm gears. It works like a one-way (well, limited usually to a 25:75 ratio) valve for torque. You can turn a gear with the worm gear, but you can't turn the worm gear with a regular gear. It couples the two output sides of the diff with these worm gears, so they can transfer torque across the diff if an imbalance in traction occurrs. Subaru also uses a Torsen in the rear diff of the WRX STI.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/B5wiJ10PYXY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Your RAV4 is basically a FWD car with a transversely mounted engine, like the Audi A3, TT, VW R32, the Hondas with 'Real Time AWD' and such. Because the engine is mounted sideways, it would take a crapload of ring and pinion gears to change direction of torque that the thing would be a big mess of bellhousings and transfer cases, and all of that added weight and equipment. So, the easy fix for this is to eliminate the center diff and just use a clutch that kicks in when needed.... or, arguably just after it's actually needed... when it's too late, as you've seen.

    There are good reasons to build cars with transversely mounted engines. It makes the front of the car much shorter, with less weight overhanging in front of the front axle, leaves more room in the passenger compartment, and are generally safer in a frontal crash . They do not lend themselves to good AWD, tho.
  • 02-10-2014
    Ilikemtb999
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Evos are transversely mounted with an active center diff. They seem to do just fine.

    I think honda, toyota, nissan etc with their "awd" systems are more about cost savings and "oh hey we have awd too" marketing than anything else. It's better than solely fwd but nowhere as good as a dedicated awd system.
  • 02-10-2014
    Neseth
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ilikemtb999 View Post
    Evos are transversely mounted with an active center diff. They seem to do just fine.

    I think honda, toyota, nissan etc with their "awd" systems are more about cost savings and "oh hey we have awd too" marketing than anything else. It's better than solely fwd but nowhere as good as a dedicated awd system.

    Yes, correct. They work well enough to help you get unstuck from a parking space or something like that. For most people, they'll never know the difference putzing around town in the snow. But for going up steep snowy hills, you can definitely tell the difference in performance.

    It's not really fair to compare an EVO or Audi to a lower level subaru. The price premium for those cars can buy you higher tech components. Lower priced cars have to live with simple or open differentials, and braking limited slip to help move torque to the opposite wheels. Limited to this level of technology, the inherent design of the subaru wins every time.
  • 02-10-2014
    wholesalestunna
    I love my Crosstrek. I noticed the "floaty" driving on the interstate going from NC to Florida, but it only happened when it was windy. As far as snow driving mine did great, much better than my Tacoma did last year I thought. When I got mine I had the dealer throw on the Curt hitch and got a Performance hitch rack and I love the combination. Can't find anything I don't like about this car so far!
  • 02-10-2014
    WA-CO
    1 Attachment(s)
    Orange Crosstrek in da house!
    Just took delivery of a '14 Crosstrek, Limited, with CTV, Nav and Moon-ruffie. It's got a roof rack with cross bars, the cool fin on the back and nice rubber mats.

    We also applied for the IMBA VIP discount which meant the car was 2% over dealer cost. It takes a couple of days but IMBA was super quick about it. Even if you are a member in arrears (3 months?) you can update your membership and still get the discount. Details Here: https://www.imba.com/subaru-vip

    I've been so impressed with Subaru sponsorship of the trail care crew for so many years, I wanted our next car to be a Subie. Fortunately my wife really liked the CrossTrek (she won't drive any station wagon) so I'm glad to be back. The Baja we had was a great car.

    The Trail Care Crew program's success is in large part due to on-going sponsorship from Subaru of America. The teams travel in new Subaru Outbacks provided by Subaru of America. The company has generously been the Trail Care Crew's title sponsor since the program began in 1997.

    Attachment 868714
  • 02-10-2014
    wholesalestunna
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WA-CO View Post
    Just took delivery of a '14 Crosstrek, Limited, with CTV, Nav and Moon-ruffie. It's got a roof rack with cross bars, the cool fin on the back and nice rubber mats.

    We also applied for the IMBA VIP discount which meant the car was 2% over dealer cost. It takes a couple of days but IMBA was super quick about it. Even if you are a member in arrears (3 months?) you can update your membership and still get the discount. Details Here: https://www.imba.com/subaru-vip

    I've been so impressed with Subaru sponsorship of the trail care crew for so many years, I wanted our next car to be a Subie. Fortunately my wife really liked the CrossTrek (she won't drive any station wagon) so I'm glad to be back. The Baja we had was a great car.

    The Trail Care Crew program's success is in large part due to on-going sponsorship from Subaru of America. The teams travel in new Subaru Outbacks provided by Subaru of America. The company has generously been the Trail Care Crew's title sponsor since the program began in 1997.

    Attachment 868714

    That's a nice ride! I wouldn't have mind getting the orange but I took what my dealer had for the better deal.
  • 02-10-2014
    Harold
    it's been great to have our XV this winter, this being our first winter with the car. we've had quite a bit of snow this winter and the xv has dealt with it like it was nothing. I have to baby my Fit in the snow but the xv, as long as you're not stomping the gas or the brakes, does really well. What impressed me the most was the last snowstorm we had, dropped about a foot overnight. wife had to leave early so I didn't have the driveway shoveled. the car just crawled through it no problem, without even putting a foot on the gas (we have the CVT).
  • 02-10-2014
    Neseth
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    it's been great to have our XV this winter, this being our first winter with the car. we've had quite a bit of snow this winter and the xv has dealt with it like it was nothing. I have to baby my Fit in the snow but the xv, as long as you're not stomping the gas or the brakes, does really well. What impressed me the most was the last snowstorm we had, dropped about a foot overnight. wife had to leave early so I didn't have the driveway shoveled. the car just crawled through it no problem, without even putting a foot on the gas (we have the CVT).

    Next, you'll have to learn how to get the car to turn in the snow by giving it throttle, it's so much fun. Although i have a manual, i'm not sure how this plays out with the CVT.
  • 02-10-2014
    Harold
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Neseth View Post
    Next, you'll have to learn how to get the car to turn in the snow by giving it throttle, it's so much fun. Although i have a manual, i'm not sure how this plays out with the CVT.

    I've noticed this exiting the snowy driveway into the street, and on slushy highways. Unfortunately, this car isn't MY daily driver (the Fit is my daily driver), so I don't really get to play with it much.
  • 02-10-2014
    WA-CO
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wholesalestunna View Post
    That's a nice ride! I wouldn't have mind getting the orange but I took what my dealer had for the better deal.

    Thanks! It's wifey's car, and she wanted orange, so she gets orange. It's a funky color, but not nearly as cool as the plasma green on the new hybrid. Wow...

    Next, I gotta get a hitch mount installed so I can mount up the Thule rack
  • 02-10-2014
    trek7100
    What's a Curt hitch?
  • 02-10-2014
    WA-CO
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by trek7100 View Post
    What's a Curt hitch?

    Link: Trailer Hitch by Curt for 2013 XV Crosstrek - C13135
  • 02-10-2014
    Silentfoe
    The curt hitch is easy to install by yourself as well.
  • 02-11-2014
    Jem7sk
    I test drove an impreza and a Crosstrek today. Are there any cars in this price range that can compete with this suspension? This is the best driving car I have ever driven. The car levels out whether braking, accelerating or turning. I thought it was pretty peppy from 0-60 too. The salesman had me drive it off the road up a little hill (florida) in some sugar sand and do a tight 360. No problems getting stuck at all. Had me accelerate hard on the grass and it didn't spin then had me slam the brakes and it didn't slide. I'm imprezzed pun intended.

    The only negative was driving down the interstate at 70mph it seemed to want to move around in the lane a little. Probably from the slightest movement of my hand as it is very tight and sensitive to steering. You can shake it around at that speed and it stays level and doesn't want to fish tail or get out of control. They told me to take the Crosstrek home for a couple of days and drive it so it is in the driveway now. I'll see if I am still liking it when I take it back.
  • 02-11-2014
    thickfog
    Re: Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ranier View Post
    Yesterday, I drove home a '14 Premium with sunroof trading in my Honda Fit. My first foray into the Subaru world. The ride and driving experience as much better than the Fit. Got a great deal on my trade, got the car well below dealer cost and they even threw in rear spoiler.

    Now to decide on a trailer hitch and maybe darker tint on the front side windows. Pretty excited, my first new car since I bought my Frontier back in '99. I literally drove that til it died and plan to do the same with the Crosstrek!

    Go here and look for the eco hitch. It hides under the bumper. The stinger fits through the unused rear foglamp knockout. Very cool. Easy install. 1.25 or 2 inch available. http://torkliftcentral.com
  • 02-11-2014
    kustomz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    The only negative was driving down the interstate at 70mph it seemed to want to move around in the lane a little.

    They do move around quite a bit. Some say alignment, others say tires. It is not the most annoying thing about this car, but it is always noticeable for me. I won't go into my laundry list of things I really dislike about this car. It always upsets the Subaru purist's, and they mention that is not what this car is about... whatever! I came from a 2010 Mazda 3 GT, but needed more ground clearance for snow and less cabin noise than the CX5 I looked at. Now I am stuck with the Crosstrek for another 4 years and then will get something else.
  • 02-11-2014
    Jem7sk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    They do move around quite a bit. Some say alignment, others say tires. It is not the most annoying thing about this car, but it is always noticeable for me. I won't go into my laundry list of things I really dislike about this car. It always upsets the Subaru purist's, and they mention that is not what this car is about... whatever! I came from a 2010 Mazda 3 GT, but needed more ground clearance for snow and less cabin noise than the CX5 I looked at. Now I am stuck with it for another 4 years and then will get something else.

    How was the Mazda 3. That is next on my list to check out.
  • 02-11-2014
    Neseth
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    The only negative was driving down the interstate at 70mph it seemed to want to move around in the lane a little. Probably from the slightest movement of my hand as it is very tight and sensitive to steering. You can shake it around at that speed and it stays level and doesn't want to fish tail or get out of control. They told me to take the Crosstrek home for a couple of days and drive it so it is in the driveway now. I'll see if I am still liking it when I take it back.

    I haven't driven one of the new ones yet, i have a 2008 and it feels planted on the highway. But i think the problem is actually something inherent with electric power steering. I had a brand new pathfinder as a rental a few months ago and took it on a 3 hour road trip. I was exhausted from making all the constant steering corrections. It too did the same thing as you describe, and it has electric power steering.

    Most manufacturers are switching to electric power steering for the fuel savings. A traditional hydraulic pump is constantly running.
  • 02-12-2014
    SS Hack
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    I don't notice any weird steering on the '14 Forester - but it has good tires for a new car. My only compliant is the 6 speed manual feels somewhat vague compared to the '09 Impreza it replaced. One thing that should be noted is the high resale value of these cars - just sold the '09 for 70 percent of its sale price in a week on Craigslist.
  • 02-12-2014
    kustomz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    How was the Mazda 3. That is next on my list to check out.

    The 2010 GT was the most perfect vehicle I had ever owned in 35 years, accept for the low stance in the snow. That is why I purchased the Subaru.
  • 02-12-2014
    trek7100
    kustomz, why don't you like the Crosstrek?
  • 02-12-2014
    LB412
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Neseth View Post
    I haven't driven one of the new ones yet, i have a 2008 and it feels planted on the highway. But i think the problem is actually something inherent with electric power steering. I had a brand new pathfinder as a rental a few months ago and took it on a 3 hour road trip. I was exhausted from making all the constant steering corrections. It too did the same thing as you describe, and it has electric power steering.
    Most manufacturers are switching to electric power steering for the fuel savings. A traditional hydraulic pump is constantly running.

    I drive on the freeway at 70 5 days a week. Never experienced this problem.
  • 02-12-2014
    newfangled
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LB412 View Post
    I drive on the freeway at 70 5 days a week. Never experienced this problem.

    It sounds like the yawing problem we had on winter roads basically anywhere above 40mph, which was fixed by an alignment.
  • 02-13-2014
    kustomz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by trek7100 View Post
    kustomz, why don't you like the Crosstrek?

    First let me say that perhaps it is not fair to compare my Crosstrek to the previous Mazda 3 GT, sort of apples to oranges. Yet the Mazda was a much more refined in technology and actually cost less. Both vehicles were purchased as top of line models less sunroof and navigation. I suppose what is gained in all wheel drive and ground clearance will have to be a trade off in the loss of technology that functions well. Also of note is why I even got rid of the Mazda and purchased the Subaru. My daughter totaled out her old Jetta and needed a new car and my wife wanted her in something more reliable. We also needed something that would get around better in snow as our work does not offer days off for this.

    So here is my list of dislikes with our 2013 Crosstrek.

    Nervous and drifting steering. No power seats or lumbar adjustment on Limited model. No play or pause button on the Type B audio head unit. Bluetooth control does not play well with our phones but all other cars we own do. Randomly decides not to recognize a USB stick, whether cheap or premium brands meeting recommended specification is used. You cannot access stereo options unless vehicle is in park. The info center select button is located in an awkward to reach position. You cannot open garage door with Homelink button until the key is turned on. The climate control fan is clattery and noisy in colder weather. The sliding armrest does not lock into positions and is constantly moving forward and back. The rear hatch is flimsy and when shutting does not latch unless you are closing from a straight on angle of motion. When folding rear seats flat, you have to move front seats forward or remove rear headrest. We are constantly finding the PZEV Gnomes busy in the middle of the night (there is some type of noisy re-circulation pump that is randomly running in the middle of the night). In our first 10,000 miles of ownership it will not get EPA mileage unless you are running premium fuel and driving under speed limit.
  • 02-13-2014
    newfangled
    ^ the sliding armrest really is a head-scratcher. My dog always steps onto it, which causes it to slide forward, and it has guillotined at least one cup in the cupholders.
  • 02-13-2014
    SS Hack
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Bummer about the guy with problems - they mostly seem minor however. Are these US made, my dealer claims the Japanese units are much better. One thing is that unless you really plan to use the AWD a lot, these aren't the best mall hopping cars.
  • 02-13-2014
    lonefrontranger
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pinkrobe View Post
    Full disclosure; I own a 2002 WRX wagon and a 2010 STI hatch. I have beat the living **** out of the WRX, and it won't die. Gravel roads, snowbanks, potholes, ditches, airtime, sorta-accidental drifting - it comes back for more. The parts I have worn out are generally replaceable by your average backyard mechanic - struts, spark plugs, tires, light bulbs...

    imo that generation WRX is on its way to being an absolute classic. My mother-in-law has an '02 WRX 5-speed sedan and it Will. Not. Die.

    bonus footage of an older WRX "rescuing" a prowler from a snowbank. That cop car is about 3x the size of the Suby, too.

    We have an '05 Outback Legacy XT 5-speed wagon; prior to that we had an '05 WRX hatch. The wagon came to us with a number of interesting mods, courtesy of the prior owner who used it for ice racing up in Georgetown.

    I am of the opinion that the additional 3" of ground clearance may not be that necessary IF you know what you are doing; we had the WRX up a few pretty nasty fire roads including the Avalanche Campground near Carbondale, CO which is a 2-mile haul up a 4x4 road with a couple of pretty deep creek crossings.

    in any case, get the stick. I learned to drive stick on our Outback and even with the heavy racing clutch and +300 bhp (yes, it's chipped, too) it's a great handling and driving car. Plus it goes like stink, sounds mean and is the most comfortable car for long road trips I've ever ridden in, short of a 5-series Mercedes which is like 4x the price.
  • 02-13-2014
    pimpbot
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    First let me say that perhaps it is not fair to compare my Crosstrek to the previous Mazda 3 GT, sort of apples to oranges. Yet the Mazda was a much more refined in technology and actually cost less. Both vehicles were purchased as top of line models less sunroof and navigation. I suppose what is gained in all wheel drive and ground clearance will have to be a trade off in the loss of technology that functions well. Also of note is why I even got rid of the Mazda and purchased the Subaru. My daughter totaled out her old Jetta and needed a new car and my wife wanted her in something more reliable. We also needed something that would get around better in snow as our work does not offer days off for this.

    So here is my list of dislikes with our 2013 Crosstrek.

    Nervous and drifting steering. No power seats or lumbar adjustment on Limited model. No play or pause button on the Type B audio head unit. Bluetooth control does not play well with our phones but all other cars we own do. Randomly decides not to recognize a USB stick, whether cheap or premium brands meeting recommended specification is used. You cannot access stereo options unless vehicle is in park. The info center select button is located in an awkward to reach position. You cannot open garage door with Homelink button until the key is turned on. The climate control fan is clattery and noisy in colder weather. The sliding armrest does not lock into positions and is constantly moving forward and back. The rear hatch is flimsy and when shutting does not latch unless you are closing from a straight on angle of motion. When folding rear seats flat, you have to move front seats forward or remove rear headrest. We are constantly finding the PZEV Gnomes busy in the middle of the night (there is some type of noisy re-circulation pump that is randomly running in the middle of the night). In our first 10,000 miles of ownership it will not get EPA mileage unless you are running premium fuel and driving under speed limit.

    Thanks for the reply on this. It's hard to get honest gripes about stuff like this.

    as far as the Homelink goes, I can see why they did that. Imagine you parked your car on the street in front of your house. Would it be wise to leave the Homelink buttons active so somebody can just break a window on your XV and open your garage door? What would be nice is if they made it so that it stays live for 5 minutes after you unlock the doors, or 5 minutes after you take the key out, or until you lock the doors.

    And I don't think the twitchy handling has anything to do with electric assisted steering. Everybody is building cars that way now, and I've never really felt this in other cars.... and I drive a lot of new-ish rental cars. I would guess it is more of an alignment issue. Too much toe-out can make any car feel twitchy, especially on the rear wheels. I wonder how much the suspension geometry changes during wheel travel? That can cause twitchy handling as well, being a longer travel Impreza, basically.

    Bummer about the fuel mileage. That was one of my primary hot buttons about the XV.
  • 02-13-2014
    Harold
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    My wife does not get epa economy in hers, but she mashes on the gas. The cvt does not require much. I do much better actually.

    The subaru radio is absolute shit. Tried listening to an audio book with several files and using the car's head unit, could not figure out which was which. It sounds cheap, too.

    I agree about the sliding armrest too. Have mot experienced the other issues. They are minor as far as I'm concerned. We bought the car for other reasons
  • 02-14-2014
    Jem7sk
    The dealer I am working with does not have any 2014 models. What's the difference in the 2013 and 2014?
  • 02-14-2014
    SS Hack
    Subaru XV Crosstrek
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    The dealer I am working with does not have any 2014 models. What's the difference in the 2013 and 2014?

    I think you need another dealer unless you can get a fire sale price.
  • 02-14-2014
    Jem7sk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    I think you need another dealer unless you can get a fire sale price.

    Amen to that.. I told the guy what I wanted and he handed my keys back to me. I left and went to another dealer where they had 2014 models and got it $1500 lower than the 2013 with 200 miles in it. The 2014 drives so much better than that 2013 too... As good as the top of the line Forester. I am amazed how well these things drive. And I hardly ever see Subarus on the rode her in Fl.
  • 02-14-2014
    bradkay
    "You cannot access stereo options unless vehicle is in park. The info center select button is located in an awkward to reach position."

    IMO, these are as it should be. The driver should be concentrating on his driving, not playing with stereo options or his e-mail (or whatever other options show up in the "info center"). I know that mine is not a popular attitude these days, but as a person who is a road cyclist as well as a mountain biker I am tired of having my life endangered by someone completely distracted playing with their bluetooth or programming their GPS. Do that stuff while the car is parked, not while you are in motion - the latter is endangering other users of our public roads.
  • 02-14-2014
    newfangled
    ^ yeah, I totally agree. As a passenger it's a bit annoying that I can't pair my phone, but then I remember that people are idiots and that this is much better than the alternative.
  • 02-14-2014
    Jem7sk
    Finally got my Crosstrek. What a nightmare experience... Don't think I'll ever buy new again but I think I did get a good deal. I ended up getting an Impreza Sport too. I think that made it all the worse in negotiations. Took twice as long. Don't ever buy two cars at once. I was in there for six hours. Well, I don't get the impreza until tomorrow but here is the Crosstrek in the dark. It is actually the wife's vehicle. She wanted one too and I didn't want to have two Crosstreks. I thought the Imprezza Sport Premium in the same color looked great so got it for myself. Is it cheaper and better to buy a roof bike rack 15% off from Subaru or buy online somewhere?

  • 02-14-2014
    Eazy_E
    3 Attachment(s)
    Well, my Crosstrek is dead. Got rear ended at 50MPH. I'm 95% sure or more it's a total. It died, so I didn't though. Did exactly what it was supposed to do. Middle pic is the front end of the '13 Hyundai that plowed me. Whatever. I probably won't get another Crosstrek, but I'm gonna get another Subaru for sure. RIP.

    Attachment 869806
    Attachment 869807
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  • 02-14-2014
    Jem7sk
    Damn! Glad you are alright... What do you think you will get next time?
  • 02-15-2014
    kustomz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    IMO, these are as it should be. The driver should be concentrating on his driving, not playing with stereo option

    Well, I guess that I somewhat agree with you. Most people never pull the owners manual out to learn the car and the functions it has, then try to figure it out on the fly and become distracted drivers. On the flip side, if you did study the manual and learn how to easily access this stuff, it should be perfectly safe to adjust the bass or treble while driving down the road to match different styles of music. C'mon, at least give me the basics!

    I am just glad that I was raised in an era when people were taught how to pay attention. Technology becomes better and the people become less attentive... there is a day coming when we will never get any productivity in this world because everyone will be pulled to the side of the road trying to adjust our safer vehicles. Realizing that I am starting to sound just like my father. Good!!!! :thumbsup:;)
  • 02-15-2014
    bradkay
    I can understand that attitude, kustomz... I have an Alpine stereo in my Loyale (which interestingly is almost exactly the same as the Pioneer in my Civic) that uses the same button to control the volume, the fader, the bass and treble controls, etc. Many times when I reach over to adjust the volume I "push" the button, switching it to a different control. Then I have to spend the time readjusting the control I wasn't wanting to adjust and cycling through to get back to the volume control. If I am in traffic I wait until I am stopped to do it...