Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243

    Silverado Crew Cab -- transporting bike in truck bed?

    Hey guys. I have a 2008 Silverado and the bed is pretty short; I believe something like 5.5ft. My Stumpjumper doesn't stand up and allow me to close the tailgate. Any ideas on how I can transport the bike without laying it over in the truck bed?

    Thanks!

    JS
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  2. #2
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    fork mount on the front bed rail is pretty traditional.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    68
    Fork mount, or tailgate pad with the front wheel and fork hanging over the tailgate are the 2 most popular options.
    2009 Trek Fuel EX8 Black/White

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    145
    I would just tie it down like I do my motocross bikes and leave the gate down. I have a shortbox stepside that will fit my mtb with the gate closed. But my motorcycles I have to leave it down.
    I always haul my mtb the same way as my dirt bikes because it is fast, secure, and doesn't require F'ing with taking the front wheel off and putting it back on 47 times a week.
    This is a quick video I found. It isn't a dirt bike or mtb....but same tie down method.
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=r...&v=jCNK-Fs4jN4

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    116
    I use a Dakine Pick UP pad which I really like. I use a tie down over the top tube to keep it secure when I drive long distances.

    Dakine Pick Up Pad

    Post #11 has photos of my truck with my bike.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243
    Thanks @Hobbs305, I have been leaning towards the pads. My cattle dog has to ride in the bed so I can't leave the tailgate open. That rules out several options.

    So what are the differences between this pad and the Thule and Yakima versions?
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  7. #7
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    with the pads, watch for rubbing between the axle/rotor/caliper and your truck.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    116
    js_paddle07- not sure what the difference are between the brands. I purchased mine from Hucknroll months ago and was on sale.

    As Bill in Houston said, watch for rubbing of the axle/rotor/caliper on other bikes you load up. Those items do not touch the pad as the wheel and fork touch the pad. If you load mulitple bikes, this might be a concern. I've only transported 2 bikes at once (the most) so far and the bikes do not touch or over lap each other. I actually turn the front wheel the opposite direction than photographs to protect the rotor from debris while driving.

    I do not leave the pick up pad on all the time. It takes me less than 5 minutes to install it and I'm taking my time.

    Best of luck.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    752
    Just bolt a fork mount to the front bed rail. I have a cc sb silverado with a deep toolbox and I have 3 fork mounts mounted on top. This way it is also easy to lock the bike up as well.

  10. #10
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,855
    Just sling it in the back, lay it down and don't worry if it gets scratched.

    It is is a mountain bike, it is is supposed to look used.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243
    I completely agree with this. It is hard to justify a rack when you can just lay it down.

    BUT, I want something that will allow my dog to have room to lay down and move around. If I lay my bike down in the bed and then put all my gear in there, he will be tripping all over the stuff while we are going down the road.

    This will upset him, so then he will intentionally let himself become distracted by wildlife and random scents on our ride, as opposed to being a good riding partner and sticking to the trail.
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rack Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    126
    Here's what I made....I usually only transport one bike so its perfect for me.....Super easy loading...I can load it without even getting in the bed of the truck!


  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Naturally Aspirated's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    344
    I think you should be able to still do it "moto style." Just swing the rear tire towards one side of the bed and it might fit.
    Yeti SB-66 Carbon

  14. #14
    gran jefe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,088
    black iron pipe? how is it connected to the bed?

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KylesCog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    8
    I used a Thule insta-gater in a regular cab F150 with a pretty short bed. The front wheel is up 4 in or so and with my 29er that has a longer wheel base I just cocked the back wheel to the side. Another option would be to catch the back wheel in the rack and turn the front end to the side. That would definitely give the dog plenty of room. I loved those racks. Still have them, but sold the truck.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243
    So the back wheel will fit in the Insta-Gater okay?
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KylesCog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    8
    Absolutely. The tire presses against the tailgate and you can rotate the arm until it's right on the frame and that bike won't go anywhere. Even driving off-road. The arm is offset from the clamping device, so I can't imagine any problems with the derailleur or something. It's a great setup if it fits your bed. I'm not sure if my bed was 5.5 or 6 ft.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243
    So rather than clamping down the wheel like you would ideally with this rack, you would use the arm to clamp down somewhere on the frame?
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KylesCog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    8
    No, it'd still be clamped down on the tire, I was just describing how you can rotate the arm until the arm rests against the frame and clamps down on the tire. This would help prevent any lateral movement since the front end could still move. Typically you clamp down the front end and the rear wheel won't sway at all. But if you put the back end in and turn the front wheel you would save 10 inches or so in length. I have 2 racks and I did this when I put 2 bikes in the bed. Hope that helps.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243
    Gotcha. Thanks for the suggestions Kyle!
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I have hope for the human race. ~ H.G. Wells

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by Naturally Aspirated View Post
    I think you should be able to still do it "moto style." Just swing the rear tire towards one side of the bed and it might fit.
    This is what I do. Put it in straight and use tie down straps on the handlebars then swing the rear end to one side and i can easily close the tailgate. 29er in a 5ft bed.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rack Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    black iron pipe? how is it connected to the bed?
    I used the existing bed bolt.....Black pipe....and I used a 1/4" plate that is welded on the bottom thats sits down into the bed rib to keep it from being able to spin.....If I had to do it again (and I will)....I would make it out of square tube and make it with an adjustable width to accomodate different tire sizes.....


  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mazda Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    131
    It's kind of hilarious how bad this picture turned out. Somehow, some odd filter was being applied, and I didn't see it in the camera's screen, believe it or not.

    The bike is actually standing almost 100% vertical, even though it doesn't look like it. What I do is, for my bike, I run a ratchet strap from where the rear wheel sits, run it forward along the bike, then around where the rear shock mounts, and then back to the back of the back wheel. It then goes into the ratchet side of the strap, which I've got wrapped around the back wheel/tire to make sure it doesn't go anywhere. I've also got the back tire wedged between two of the ridges in the bed to be sure it doesn't slide to the side, or slide down any.

    The front tire is the exact same way, just opposite. I've got it turned because it's too long to fit in the bed of the truck straight. The ratchet side of the strap is wrapped around the wheel, basically right around the tire, through the spokes, not around the entire wheel(Same with the rear.),but I actually run a strap from the rear of the bike, around the other side of the bike, along the frame, wrapping around it in a few spots, and then it goes into the strap.

    Done correctly, it sits there, and has sat there for multiple hour long drives on the interstate, over extremely bumpy cobble stone roads, and what have you. A little bit of play is fine, as long as the tires can't slide and let the bike fall over, then you might scratch your bed. But if you tie it in right, it won't scratch your truck.

    Man, such a long post to describe something so simple, lol. I have since gotten my camera working, so I can take better pictures later if you want.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Silverado Crew Cab -- transporting bike in truck bed?-img_20120929_175105.jpg  

    2009 Mongoose Teocali Comp

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    676
    I use a bed extender. I duct taped some piping foam on the horizontal tube of the bed extender and then have the front wheel hanging over the bed extender like the tailgate pads. I use a ratchet strap over the top tube to make sure everything is tied down tight.

    The nice thing about the system is that I dont have to leave anything in the garage or do anything special. Just put down the tailgate, flip the bed extender and put the bike in.

    Laying the bike down takes up too much room in the bed. tailgate pads have to be stored somewhere etc.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KylesCog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    8
    Good call, goodmojo. I had a bed extender in an Explorer Sport Trac with a really short bed. It was so useful. I also liked how when it was in the bed with the tailgate shut it created a space so something like a back pack wouldn't fly around the bed. Didn't really like the truck/ SUV or whatever it was, but the bed extender was great.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •