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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    I remember back in my old neighborhood, there were some old people with a big house, two story, stately looking.

    In front of it they parked the most monstrous tan RV. It took up half of the street; you could hardly even see their nice house. Every day it shocked us at how stupid and lazy those people were, and how little consideration they had for their neighbors or the world around them.
    Yup, we better do something about old people who think they have the right to RV after 50 years of work. Maybe we should force them to live in Luisiana with all those other stupid lazy people.

    Or maybe it's just you. Maybe working at a penitentiary has turned you into an insensitive jerk. Or maybe it's having to ride trails void of mountains, created by bulldozers and folks pushing their lawnmowers through fields of vegetation. It's enough to make any mountain biker a bit testy.



    [SIZE="5"]Luisiana single-track?[/SIZE]
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  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    I remember back in my old neighborhood, there were some old people with a big house, two story, stately looking.

    In front of it they parked the most monstrous tan RV. It took up half of the street; you could hardly even see their nice house. Every day it shocked us at how stupid and lazy those people were, and how little consideration they had for their neighbors or the world around them.
    Maybe you should choose neighborhoods that have HOA's that don't alllow this sort of thing.

  3. #78
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    You don't know what you're talking about, but keep searching my website, I'd be happy to take you on a ride up and down a few hills some time.

    Let's get back to your God-given right to screw over the Earth after 50 years of hard work on the job. How sensitive to the environment are you being? I have plenty of sensitivity for what matters, and your feelings or your overblown sense of entitlement certainly isn't important to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son
    Yup, we better do something about old people who think they have the right to RV after 50 years of work. Maybe we should force them to live in Luisiana with all those other stupid lazy people.

    Or maybe it's just you. Maybe working at a penitentiary has turned you into an insensitive jerk. Or maybe it's having to ride trails void of mountains, created by bulldozers and folks pushing their lawnmowers through fields of vegetation. It's enough to make any mountain biker a bit testy.



    [SIZE="5"]Luisiana single-track?[/SIZE]

  4. #79
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    Maybe people who move into a historic district should be expected to have some taste and respect for their neighbors. I'm sure they're working on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by formica
    Maybe you should choose neighborhoods that have HOA's that don't alllow this sort of thing.

  5. #80
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    Am I missing something?

    Luisiana
    Ahem. The correct term is "Lousy-ana" Thank you.

    /Born and raised there, so I know. As for the lack of mountains, you have a point. But the hills in 110% humidity and 110 degrees can still leave you, quite literally, "breathless".

    And, in defense of RV'ers, I hope to get an RV or trailer someday. But, rest assured TunicaTrails, I'll use only all-natural fuel.
    Last edited by CajunAg08; 07-22-2009 at 01:15 PM.
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  6. #81
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    All I really remember of rvs is the dreaded summer trips. forcing a family that doesnt get along, but is too enthralled and fascinated with the perfect family unit into a small space for a couple weeks at a time, doing things none of us enjoyed, but only went along because "everyone else" liked it definitely left a sour taste in my mouth. But then again, the only thing to do would be go on long rides on my pacific just to get away from everyone, so in some sense, my appreciation of mountain biking is partly an offshoot from those dreaded trips.

    but then again, I also probably wouldnt have a finger or two without a rv. We got caught in a freak storm on a remote lake canoeing in late late fall once when I was growing up in northern mn. A front was approaching at 90 degrees to the way the wind was going, and we didn't pay much attention as it was a drizzling/flurrying day anyway. The front approached so fast we didn't really have a choice, once we realized how dark the clouds looked. We heard it coming by the sound of trees cracking as it came towards us, and the initial gust of wind blurred the area between the lake and the sky, just making it a mist, no clear definition of which was which as it ripped the top off the water. I was in a kayak, and I couldn't see my sister or my father in a canoe presumably around 30 feet away. the wind just pushed us across to the nearest shore and pinned us there for around 10 minutes, then it calmed down and we were able to fight it back to the rv. I remember sticking my hands in the sub 50 degree water to warm them back up on the paddle back. We were hypothermic and shock was starting to set in. Having a shelter with heater in it ready saved some very grave and lasting injuries that day. I still don't have proper feeling in my hands, and several of my fingers get cold much much quicker because of that day.
    i smell a rat-Patrick Henry

  7. #82
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    So what are YOU doing?

    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    http://www.greenlearning.ca/climate/...ns/lifestyle/4

    OK, everyone in this thread, have a seat in your captain's chair while I share something with you:

    Taking an entire friggin' house with you on the road when you travel is neither the best way to get close to nature, nor the best way to show respect for it. It's just plain wasteful. Not to mention, it's nowhere near as nice or affordable as a resort hotel or a bed and breakfast. Why, why, why?... It's just an illusion of independance. To everyone not travelling in your RV, you look like a family hooked on life support.
    If you are going to cast stones, I have to ask what you are doing to limit impact? Do you garden/buy local produce, compost, recycle, commute on foot or bike? Hopefully you are thinking about those types of things.

    While I don't disagree about the large RV's, there are other lower impact options such as small popup campers. The problem with lodges/bed and breakfasts/motels etc is that you end up driving back and forth to trails once you are at your destination, which can burn a lot of fuel in and of itself. This is particularly true if you are spending time in very remote locations. Plus, if you have ever spent time in places like Nevada, for example, you know that a lot of the lodging in remote areas can be pretty undesirable. Not that I haven't flopped at plenty of nasty motels over the years. But after having spent many years of tenting it in shitstorm weather, I decided to spoil myself a few years ago with a small hard sided pop-up that I can pull with my Ranger. I am seeing a lot of vans/small campers in this thread which seems to me to be a reasonable option for people that spend a lot of time in the outdoors. I have also used mine as a mobile office for work.

    We all contribute to environmental impact issues, and should try to do better. But how far is each of us willing to go? It could be said that we really shouldn't be travelling at all to ride around on toys such as mountain bikes that extract their own toll due to the materials they are made of. Right? My point is that we are all guilty of impact, to varying degrees, so be careful that you don't lose the third leg of a falsely elevated stool.

  8. #83
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    Yes, we do buy local produce at the farmer's market. Yes I do compost. Yes, since our Parish (county) does not have a recycling program, we collect and carry in recyclables to the neighboring Parish when I visit my relatives biweekly. Yes, I commute to work by bicycle.

    All of these, I have to say, have their own rewards. Riding a bike, as I doubt I'll get any argument from others here, is fun! Buying fresh local produce (and growing our own in our vegetable garden), is a wonderful experience. Composting is easy and just makes sense, plus the trash can is much lighter and not nearly as smelly.

    I see plenty of wasteful drivers where I live but elsewhere also. Driving a giant house on wheels is inexcusable in this day and age. If you have a pop-up camper for a truck and can't find a motel near your destination, God love you, go for it. On the other hand I've seen some really nice tents out there that would save gas and are probably more comfortable than a camper once they're set up.

    The bed and breakfasts I've seen in my neck of the woods are luxurious. Think of staying in one or a nice hotel if you can. Even several hundred dollars a night gives you a much better value for your money and, if you're getting towards retirement age, a truly luxurious treatment that old bones might ache for.

    Quote Originally Posted by BumpityBump
    If you are going to cast stones, I have to ask what you are doing to limit impact? Do you garden/buy local produce, compost, recycle, commute on foot or bike? Hopefully you are thinking about those types of things.

    While I don't disagree about the large RV's, there are other lower impact options such as small popup campers. The problem with lodges/bed and breakfasts/motels etc is that you end up driving back and forth to trails once you are at your destination, which can burn a lot of fuel in and of itself. This is particularly true if you are spending time in very remote locations. Plus, if you have ever spent time in places like Nevada, for example, you know that a lot of the lodging in remote areas can be pretty undesirable. Not that I haven't flopped at plenty of nasty motels over the years. But after having spent many years of tenting it in shitstorm weather, I decided to spoil myself a few years ago with a small hard sided pop-up that I can pull with my Ranger. I am seeing a lot of vans/small campers in this thread which seems to me to be a reasonable option for people that spend a lot of time in the outdoors. I have also used mine as a mobile office for work.

    We all contribute to environmental impact issues, and should try to do better. But how far is each of us willing to go? It could be said that we really shouldn't be travelling at all to ride around on toys such as mountain bikes that extract their own toll due to the materials they are made of. Right? My point is that we are all guilty of impact, to varying degrees, so be careful that you don't lose the third leg of a falsely elevated stool.

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    Yes, we do buy local produce at the farmer's market. Yes I do compost. Yes, since our Parish (county) does not have a recycling program, we collect and carry in recyclables to the neighboring Parish when I visit my relatives biweekly. Yes, I commute to work by bicycle.

    All of these, I have to say, have their own rewards. Riding a bike, as I doubt I'll get any argument from others here, is fun! Buying fresh local produce (and growing our own in our vegetable garden), is a wonderful experience. Composting is easy and just makes sense, plus the trash can is much lighter and not nearly as smelly.

    I see plenty of wasteful drivers where I live but elsewhere also. Driving a giant house on wheels is inexcusable in this day and age. If you have a pop-up camper for a truck and can't find a motel near your destination, God love you, go for it. On the other hand I've seen some really nice tents out there that would save gas and are probably more comfortable than a camper once they're set up.

    The bed and breakfasts I've seen in my neck of the woods are luxurious. Think of staying in one or a nice hotel if you can. Even several hundred dollars a night gives you a much better value for your money and, if you're getting towards retirement age, a truly luxurious treatment that old bones might ache for.
    Well I am glad you are at least subscribing to the use of local resources, etc. I do as well.

    As far as the tent comfort thing, well I've owned a dozen or so over the years. I've also dug plenty of snowcaves, stayed in yurts, truck beds, hammocks, lean-to's, and slept on the ground at -10F during a memorable Wyoming winter ski trip. Trust me, none of that was as comfortable as my pop-up.

    Sorry, I just don't do the bed and breakfast thing. And there are many places in the U.S. where that isn't an option anyway unless you want to drive to trails which I would rather not do. Plus, we don't all wish to dwell among the crowds. My wife, dog, and I have had many serene trips in our camper with not a soul around for miles. We like it that way.

  10. #85
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    Thinking about upgrading to something like this. I assume it could be converted for biodiesel to keep all the tree-huggers happy!
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  11. #86
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    Well, here's an idea: move to the place where you want to be! I have my own personal trail that begins at my doorstep, loops through 3 miles of woods, and returns to my doorstep. I can ride my bike to miles of trails through the wilderness around me. We have a sports park with extremely challenging trails 20 minutes away. I have travelled the world but I don't feel the need to take vacations all the time. It's fascinating to explore nature where I live.


    Quote Originally Posted by BumpityBump
    Well I am glad you are at least subscribing to the use of local resources, etc. I do as well.

    As far as the tent comfort thing, well I've owned a dozen or so over the years. I've also dug plenty of snowcaves, stayed in yurts, truck beds, hammocks, lean-to's, and slept on the ground at -10F during a memorable Wyoming winter ski trip. Trust me, none of that was as comfortable as my pop-up.

    Sorry, I just don't do the bed and breakfast thing. And there are many places in the U.S. where that isn't an option anyway unless you want to drive to trails which I would rather not do. Plus, we don't all wish to dwell among the crowds. My wife, dog, and I have had many serene trips in our camper with not a soul around for miles. We like it that way.

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    Even your thread is wasteful, big old pictures of your King Crew Cab Extended Custom Superline Roadmaster pieces of crap. Name me one other country where RVs sell in a profitable volume other than the United States.

    And yeehaw for that. Because it's God's green earth, given to us by Him to F*ck up.
    Well I'd tell you to go pat yourself on your back for your amazing earth-loving awesomeness but we can all tell you already do plenty of that.
    Chill out and go for a nice long ride.

  13. #88
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    I'm trying to (eventually) decide between a Scamp, and a Teardrop

    Does anyone have any experience with either? Or a similar type, towable by light sedan, under $5000?

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    Well, here's an idea: move to the place where you want to be! I have my own personal trail that begins at my doorstep, loops through 3 miles of woods, and returns to my doorstep. I can ride my bike to miles of trails through the wilderness around me. We have a sports park with extremely challenging trails 20 minutes away. I have travelled the world but I don't feel the need to take vacations all the time. It's fascinating to explore nature where I live.
    Been there done that, but moved for a career opportunity. I will be back in the west in a few years, and the work I am doing now will open up even more opportunities to pick and choose where I live. To me, the south just doesn't compare to the vast expanses of federal land out west that used to be at my doorstep. I also have teenage daughters that I visit regularly in Utah, and am able to tie trips in with that. So you don't really know all the intricate variables do you? It's easy to get caught up in one's own limited perspective.

    I am also currently 20 minutes from some nice single track and can ride county roads from my house. I "explore nature" for my work so get plenty of time in doing that as well, trust me. Another advantage is that all my non-field work is done from home so my office "commute" consists of strolling out to my own kitchen to make coffee in the morning.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer
    I'm trying to (eventually) decide between a Scamp, and a Teardrop

    Does anyone have any experience with either? Or a similar type, towable by light sedan, under $5000?
    We have an Aliner: http://www.aliner.com/design/product...php#6?sectid=5

    They are light and can be pulled with fairly small cars, depending on the model. The down side is the high cost and some quality control issues. You can find them used for under $5,000 and most the quality issues I have been able to fix myself without too much expense.

    When I was looking, I really liked the Scamp, but it was too tall to fit under my carport at the time. The Aliner has better natural light options and probably pulls better during high winds. The Scamps have a pretty good reputation for durability. The teardrops just seemed too cramped to me.

    We really like our Aliner, but I did cuss a lot at the poor workmanship when I first got it, but have resolved most of the issues now. They do tow very nicely and the off-road frame has 14" of clearance and suspension, which is really nice for bumpier roads.

  16. #91
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    ... and if we just ... Found ur Vise

    Quote Originally Posted by BumpityBump
    Been there done that, but moved for a career opportunity. I will be back in the west in a few years, and the work I am doing now will open up even more opportunities to pick and choose where I live. To me, the south just doesn't compare to the vast expanses of federal land out west that used to be at my doorstep. I also have teenage daughters that I visit regularly in Utah, and am able to tie trips in with that. So you don't really know all the intricate variables do you? It's easy to get caught up in one's own limited perspective.

    I am also currently 20 minutes from some nice single track and can ride county roads from my house. I "explore nature" for my work so get plenty of time in doing that as well, trust me. Another advantage is that all my non-field work is done from home so my office "commute" consists of strolling out to my own kitchen to make coffee in the morning.
    **** that is what iam talking about keep ur pimpin tight , work smarter not harder
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  17. #92
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    None of that frees you from your own personal responsibility for 8 miles to the gallon and a huge hunk of sheet metal. I didn't send you where you were, or make you drive all over creation with an apartment in your truck.

    I like the South but that's just me, I like the lush subtropics, full of life. Criticizing where I live doesn't have anything to do with the subject at hand, though does it, just another avoidance tactic?

    Rather than continually pursuing more money, putting off a real life, why not choose to do what you really want to do, within a budget, near to your family? Doesn't sound like "pimpin your life" to me, it sounds like you're compromising yourself. Which comes back to my central point: RV owners don't do it better, they just rumble around on life support, literally taking the kitchen sink with them, rather than taking a chance and having a real adventure.

    In the meantime, we all have to suffer under every day a greater strain of CO2 emissions while a grand illusion, "freedom of the road" becomes more and more clogged with traffic and smog. Only Americans think this way en masse, and you're embarrassing me.


    Quote Originally Posted by BumpityBump
    Been there done that, but moved for a career opportunity. I will be back in the west in a few years, and the work I am doing now will open up even more opportunities to pick and choose where I live. To me, the south just doesn't compare to the vast expanses of federal land out west that used to be at my doorstep. I also have teenage daughters that I visit regularly in Utah, and am able to tie trips in with that. So you don't really know all the intricate variables do you? It's easy to get caught up in one's own limited perspective.

    I am also currently 20 minutes from some nice single track and can ride county roads from my house. I "explore nature" for my work so get plenty of time in doing that as well, trust me. Another advantage is that all my non-field work is done from home so my office "commute" consists of strolling out to my own kitchen to make coffee in the morning.

  18. #93
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    I'm chill, 78 degrees actually that's cool enough. Even if I were proven to be a hyppocrite, this isn't about me, it's about you all, RV owners and what you've done.

    Just because you can afford to buy it doesn't mean you should. You see, you're taking away something from me and everyone else in the world by using much more than your fair share of natural resources.

    The sad thing is, you and I both know that travelling by RV isn't the most enjoyable, most efficient way to live your life. It's like eating potato chips, it's just there in front of you. Rather than taking the time to find a nice place to stay, really staying a while in a place and learning something about the culture of the country, you just pull up, plug up and pull out the extendable deck.


    Quote Originally Posted by srmach05
    Well I'd tell you to go pat yourself on your back for your amazing earth-loving awesomeness but we can all tell you already do plenty of that.
    Chill out and go for a nice long ride.

  19. #94
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    [QUOTE=TunicaTrails]
    Rather than continually pursuing more money, putting off a real life, why not choose to do what you really want to do, within a budget, near to your family? Doesn't sound like "pimpin your life" to me, it sounds like you're compromising yourself. [\QUOTE]

    Edited my long winded post to say: That's a pretty clueless comment.
    Last edited by BumpityBump; 07-23-2009 at 05:35 AM.

  20. #95
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    I like that for once, I'm not the most fired up passionite in the thread. It's like watching a solo break near the finish of a mountain stage. Will he be able to keep it up, or be reclaimed by the chase? Get spit out the back and swarmed by the peloton? Still off the front, no signs of relenting... Nice work, Tunica. And I do find myself agreeing with your priciples. After my limited experience, it really looked like stereotypical self-serving American consumerist excess run amok. But my experience is limited.

    Self-serving justifications of entitlement I won't even touch on, as no good ever comes of that conversation, but I like to think there are some redeeming qualities to RVing, even if we haven't come across them yet.

    I understand that as campers, it is hard not to look down upon people who seem so dependent on modern convenience and their manmade environment that even when they set out to leave home, they still have to buy and drag another ton of it in portable form with them just to survive a weekend away. This makes the camper wonder why the RVer bothered leaving home at all, if they were just going to take home with them. This seems to be the root of the Camping/RVing rift. For instance, a camper might look at Bigfoots first picture in this thread and say, well, that little egg thing is cute, but it's not much bigger than a lot of tents. Why not just use a tent and save yourself the gas, maintenance, & time? Plus, you can put a tent anywhere you want, & it uses a lot less resources over its lifespan.

    I've struggled to find a counter-viewpoint for the RV'ers side, but that is probably because I'm not one. Some possible candidates are:

    1. Selling house to live as a wandering nomad, closer to nature but not at its mercy.
    2. You may not have the faculties to survive living a full-on wilderness lifestyle, but want to come as close as your physical abilities will let you.
    3. You're completely freaked out by nature, but you want your kids to grow up well-adjusted and balanced, and it's a compromise. A generation of kids half-way exposed to nature is better than a generation of kids who've never been exposed to the natural world at all. When city kids grow and become powerful, we get environmental policies that favor concrete and steel.
    4. The faster we use up petroleum reserves, the sooner we'll have to get on to alternative fuels. Since society won't change until its forced to, they're really doing us all a favor. ...even if it pollutes like crazy and does its part to keep us ensnared in deadly middle-east politics. If it doesn't kill us first, we'll be better off eventually. Ok, I'm reaching here.

    But I'm trying anyway.

  21. #96
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    checking the scorecards

    Who do we thank for environmental nutjobs who police internet forums, complaining about how only they are enlightened and sensitive to what truly matters while all others are screwing over the earth. Even if Al Gore never existed there would have been plenty of hippies and tree huggers condemning people for living a lifestyle different from the one they are stuck living.

    I've spent over a dozen years working in a conservation corps in the southwest. I've spent countless hours out in the woods building mountain bike trails. I spent four years doing revegetation work at the Grand Canyon. I have met thousands of young people who volunteered to join me doing this type of work. Some of them think of themselves as environmentalists. Some are more anti-establishment. some are looking for a lifestyle that includes being vegetarian, doing a lot of camping, and not owning too many material goods. They, of course, get to decide how much is too much.

    I come across people like Tunica all the time. They judge people by a standard they have decided to use for their own lives. It is a standard that Tunica scores fairly high on, of course. I guess if you get to make the rules, you are going to score pretty well.

    When you take a closer look, people like Tunica are mostly poseurs. If you gathered a bunch of experts, scientists, people who could make a definitive list of the Top 100 ways to save the planet, you'd see that folks who do most of the loud talking and complaining are merely cherry-picking solutions on the very bottom of that list, solutions that have very little impact and require very little sacrifice, and then they go around condemning others for not stepping up and doing their part.

    Example; recycling your bottles and cans and cardboard is good. It isn't going to save the planet, but like handing a buck to a homeless person, you feel better about yourself afterwards. Riding your bike to work is also good. Are you doing it every single day? Do you still own a car and drive it several times a week? Then you aren't making much of a difference. Tunica said he use to commute (by car) 100 miles a day to and from work. That's awful, using his own standards. You would be better off living closer to work. Did he buy an existing home or build his dream home and use up all sorts of resources in doing so? New homes require all sorts of shipped in lumber, roofing materials that have to be made and trucked in, flooring materials, insulation, plumbing ,materials, concrete, all brought to the home site by enormous fuel burning trucks. All because someone decides they need a dream home that is far away from all those wasteful, insensitive, unenlightened people you can't stand. Even trucking you recycled waste into the nearest town becomes a wasteful journey because you have built a home too far from public services.

    Have you ever once thought of writing out that list of the 100 most important things people can do to preserve the planet? What are the Top Ten on that list? They aren't the things that Tunica talks about. They aren't shopping at a farmers market or bringing your own grocery bags to the market or recycling your beer cans. They are things nobody wants to even discuss. They are things like not having children, not owning a car, not traveling, except by foot or bike. What Tunica is doing is standing on the deck of the Titanic and shouting at everyone to pick up a bucket and bail some water. It makes him feel good but the ship is going down and he isn't going to stop it, or make a noticably difference. Nor would having 1000 others pick up a bucket and start bailing water with him. Until you get enough people to take on the more difficult sacrifices like not having children, you will not see noticable change and you will grow incresingly frustrated by others who are not doing even the little things you are chosing to do. My suggestion to Tunica; turn off your computer and save electricity and you won't have to listen to us call you a hypocrite.

    The Prodigal Son

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    Respect the land, defend the defenseless and don't ya never spit in front of women and children.

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  22. #97
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    Great post.

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by TunicaTrails
    Rather than taking the time to find a nice place to stay, really staying a while in a place and learning something about the culture of the country, you just pull up, plug up and pull out the extendable deck.
    Some would say the best way to learn something about the culture of a country is to travel around within it, not just plopping down in one place and calling it good.
    Listen, I don't even own an RV, I just took exception to the manner in which you expressed your point. If you really want to attempt to change people's opinions on the matter talking from a soapbox isn't going to do it.
    Also, I never called you a hypocrite, just insinuated that you seem to be rather self-righteous - there's a difference.
    Now let's get back to the original purpose of this thread and look at some RVs!

  24. #99
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    Reputation: The Prodigal Son's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=TunicaTrails] Even if I were proven to be a hyppocrite, this isn't about me, it's about you all, RV owners and what you've done.

    It is very much about you. You came into this thread to pick a fight. You are a hypocrite and need to look at your own wasteful ways before ever condemning others.

    You proudly post pictures of your giant home on your 15 acre property. Why did you build such a wasteful home? Why not an earth ship made of recycled car tires filled with earth? Do you collect water run-off from your roof and filter it and store it in a cistern? How many solar panels do you have on your property? Are you totally off the grid? Why not? Why are you using so much electricity (probably from a coal fired power plant) for lights and air conditioning and your computer? Why do you own a car? Why don't you even notice how truly wasteful you are. You live in a rural area? Wasn't that your choice? So what is worse, you taking 40 mile trips once a week or someone else drving 3 miles back and forth to work every day? How does anyone who calls themselves sensitive to the environment get off condemning others while they are making such selfish choices for themselves? You can recycle for the next 50 years and it won't make up for that awful wasteful home you built. It is not even close to being off grid or energy efficient. And I believe you said you own and use a gas powered lawn mower to do trail work? What? Gas powered lawn mower, what were you thinking? Did you know that the air in Los Angeles has been cleaned up so much because of all the new cars with better emissions that the top causes of polution in their air is backyard bbq grills and lawn mowers? What were you thinking when you built that house?


    Just because you can afford to buy it doesn't mean you should. You see, you're taking away something from me and everyone else in the world by using much more than your fair share of natural resources.

    What you said here about others applies even more so for you. You could afford to build a huge house with new materials that had to be made and trucked in to your home site, so you did. You didn't talk to someone about a straw bale home or an earth ship that would have save tens of thousands of dollars and a lot of natural resources. You were selfish and felt you'd make up for that selfishness by recycling your beer cans and riding your bike to work once or twice a week. It doesn't work that way. This isn't about carbon offsets. You made a selfish choice. You probably run that a/c all summer long and you probably are hooked into an electrical grid that is powered by coal fired power plants. How do you sleep at night living like you do and pretending you are sensitive to the earth. You are screwing the earth, as you would say.

    The sad thing is, you and I both know that travelling by RV isn't the most enjoyable, most efficient way to live your life.

    I've traveled a lot and camped a lot. I still have my North Face tent I bought in Berkley 20 years ago. After tenting for ten years, I tried using a pop-up camper for another 10 years. Now I am pulling a 5th swheel camper. I can invite more friends with me and cook meals even if it is raining outside. I sleep better and can honestly say that I think it is the most enjoyable way to travel and camp. QUOTE]


    So, you think you know something about camping in an RV, but it is clear you don't. It is also clear you are making very wasteful choices and not owning up to those choices but rather trying to excuse them. You are a lot like Al Gore, who preached conservation to all of America while living in a huge mansion that used up more resources than 200 regular homes. Then when he was called out for his wastefullness, he merely installed new high-efficiency light bulbs in his mansion, that didn't even affect his yearly electrical bill. You want to quit being a hypocrite? Just turn off that computer for ever and turn off your a/c and convert your home so it is totally off the grid. Oh, sell the car(s) as well. If we see you post on MTBR again, we'll know you don't really care about your wasteful use of resources.

  25. #100
    wanna dance?
    Reputation: HotBlack's Avatar
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    Feb 2008
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    Wow, prodigal son, way to avoid making any real points, and just reduce your argument to politically-tinted vitriol.

    You could just be honest and say you're gonna do what you like, and don't give a damn about the consequences. That'd be fine. No one's going to stop you from doing anything, You stand to lose nothing, and it'd be far more interesting that hearing you try to side-step your arguments using circular logic and deflection.

    Just sayin.

    But hey, enjoy your Al Gore fixation.

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