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  1. #1
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    ... and if we just ... The awesome car bike carriers of the tour the France

    Or any other race for that matter, please tell me I'm not the only freak that likes to watch this cars pack with bikes in action..

    Pictures are very welcome.

  2. #2
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    They're pretty neat to see. I've seen up close the Shimano car and its crazy how many bikes/wheels they stuff up top. A lot are small hatchbacks packed with everything you could imagine, but Team Sky is using a Jag Estate (diesel).
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57 View Post
    They're pretty neat to see. I've seen up close the Shimano car and its crazy how many bikes/wheels they stuff up top. A lot are small hatchbacks packed with everything you could imagine, but Team Sky is using a Jag Estate (diesel).
    Many years ago I work on three cars for the Cafe de Colombia racing team (Industrial Designer and I used to live in Colombia) the rack design was a challenge but really fun too, something has change the bikes used to be attach from the fork with out the front wheel, the new ones racks on the tour hold the bike complete and ready to go, great thing since keeping the "Extra" front wheels is kind of a pain in the butt..

  4. #4
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    I was watching the footage of Contador abandoning and saw them take his bike to put on the car. The team car had a mix of fork mounts and wheel mounts. I imagine the team leaders have their spare bikes in wheel mounts for quick changes. It seemed like there were at least 6 bikes on each car plus a lot of spare wheels.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gddyap View Post
    I was watching the footage of Contador abandoning and saw them take his bike to put on the car. The team car had a mix of fork mounts and wheel mounts. I imagine the team leaders have their spare bikes in wheel mounts for quick changes. It seemed like there were at least 6 bikes on each car plus a lot of spare wheels.
    Yes sorry I generalize, I was watching the same scene, they have the "center" bikes on the fork mounts and then the bikes on the outside are completes, I imagine they need to have at least two cars with one complete bike set up for each specific rider unless they happen to be the exact same size, pretty incredible logistics if you as me..

  6. #6
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    I recall once reading in an article written by a pro team mechanic that there's a definite hierarchy to the placement of the bikes on the racks. The most important rider for the day (it could vary depending on the stage) gets his spare on the outside, right above the mechanic's door in car #1, complete with the front wheel installed and ready to ride. He also has a second spare in the same position on car #2 (there are normally two cars). They then work inward from there, and the bikes in the center have the front wheels removed. Riders who are higher standing in the team have their spares on car #1, lower in the team hierarchy have their bikes on car #2.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    I recall once reading in an article written by a pro team mechanic that there's a definite hierarchy to the placement of the bikes on the racks. The most important rider for the day (it could vary depending on the stage) gets his spare on the outside, right above the mechanic's door in car #1, complete with the front wheel installed and ready to ride. He also has a second spare in the same position on car #2 (there are normally two cars). They then work inward from there, and the bikes in the center have the front wheels removed. Riders who are higher standing in the team have their spares on car #1, lower in the team hierarchy have their bikes on car #2.
    Thanks for sharing, it makes perfect sense..

  8. #8
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    Another thing from the article, each car carries seven bikes total: four complete bikes on the outside and three with the front wheel removed in the middle. The bike in the very center of the rack is practically unreachable though, and is a "backup" backup.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    Another thing from the article, each car carries seven bikes total: four complete bikes on the outside and three with the front wheel removed in the middle. The bike in the very center of the rack is practically unreachable though, and is a "backup" backup.
    Well looks like specialized is going to need to carry 14 bikes as a redundant back up of the backups

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    I recall once reading in an article written by a pro team mechanic that there's a definite hierarchy to the placement of the bikes on the racks. The most important rider for the day (it could vary depending on the stage) gets his spare on the outside, right above the mechanic's door in car #1, complete with the front wheel installed and ready to ride. He also has a second spare in the same position on car #2 (there are normally two cars). They then work inward from there, and the bikes in the center have the front wheels removed. Riders who are higher standing in the team have their spares on car #1, lower in the team hierarchy have their bikes on car #2.
    Just to elaborate on this, the protected rider (Contador, Froome, etc), will almost always have a "live" spare. Usually the team member closest to their size will be riding a bike perfectly setup for the protected rider. After a mechanical/crash, they will give their bike to the protected rider, and wait for the car with the spare bikes.

    In the case Contador's crash, Roche's bike was setup for Contador, if he had been able to immediately continue.

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