Page 53 of 63 FirstFirst ... 343495051525354555657 ... LastLast
Results 2,601 to 2,650 of 3145
  1. #2601
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    There's got to be something wrong with that receiver. You could replace it, I suppose. You've already proven it's not the rack that is causing the problem because the problem is there with the new rack as well.

    You could also just take a pad of some material - maybe even like leather - and place it over the ball in the corner of the receiver. I'd bet that would solve the problem. You'd crush it into place in the corner of the receiver and it would have to increase the friction and fill any open space remaining.

    Either that or just use the U lock method that some have used to lock their racks to the car.

    J.

  2. #2602
    unrooted
    Reputation: unrooted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,195
    I just went out and measured my trucks hitch and one on a nearby chevy, they both measured at 2 1/16".

    Also of note is that useport80 is driving a toyota. . .
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  3. #2603
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I just went out and measured my trucks hitch and one on a nearby chevy, they both measured at 2 1/16".

    Also of note is that useport80 is driving a toyota. . .
    I don't think he's claiming that it loosens only that there is some play (maybe he could clarify). One would expect that there is play because the ball only ties it down in one spot and if the receiver ID is bigger than the rack's neck OD then there would be that play and it would be normal.

    I haven't checked my rack, but I just did some work on the boats with our 2" receiver ball mount and it's not a tight fit in the receiver as one would expect. Trailer hitches and receivers are not precision things....

    J.

  4. #2604
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I just went out and measured my trucks hitch and one on a nearby chevy, they both measured at 2 1/16".

    Also of note is that useport80 is driving a toyota. . .
    Hmmm. It seems to me that the only way for it to become loose is for something to move or for something to yield (deform).

    Assuming you're not getting the deformation around the ball like you had the last time, here's some data that might help root cause the issue:

    1) Mark/scribe the bolt to see if it's loosening
    2) Mark/scribe the hitch bar to see if it's backing out.
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  5. #2605
    unrooted
    Reputation: unrooted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,195
    I can try to mark the bolt.

    I already know that the hitch bar is coming loose because I now have one of those stops that go around the hitch bar, but I don't put my rack all the way up against the hitch stop (because it's a 1.25 rack with the 2" converter on it and) because if I do then my handlebar hits the back of my truck, after I drive a ways it loosens up and moves forward into the hitch stop. i use the Velcro strap, which is plenty strong enough to keep the rack on the truck.

    I took a picture of the inside of the receiver and there are several indentations from the ball, so maybe my receiver is just made of too soft of steel, not sure if there's a fix for that, except a new hitch receiver. . . sucks.
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  6. #2606
    mtbr member
    Reputation: albertdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    475
    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I can try to mark the bolt.

    I already know that the hitch bar is coming loose because I now have one of those stops that go around the hitch bar, but I don't put my rack all the way up against the hitch stop (because it's a 1.25 rack with the 2" converter on it and) because if I do then my handlebar hits the back of my truck, after I drive a ways it loosens up and moves forward into the hitch stop. i use the Velcro strap, which is plenty strong enough to keep the rack on the truck.

    I took a picture of the inside of the receiver and there are several indentations from the ball, so maybe my receiver is just made of too soft of steel, not sure if there's a fix for that, except a new hitch receiver. . . sucks.
    What about a liner or sleave to distribute the pressure of the bolt along a wider area on the receiver? Maybe even just a thin metal plate slipped in along the top of the bike rack hitch will be enough. There is usually some space/play there, so I'm sure you could fit it. I just don't know if it would be stiff enough to actually help, but it would be worth trying.

  7. #2607
    unrooted
    Reputation: unrooted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,195
    I was just looking at stainless steel angle iron for protecting corners, I would like to give it a try, but I wonder how easily it will dent, it's 1/16" thick. . .

    I'll see if there is anything available nearby to this: Amazon.com: Stainless Corner Guard, 2" X 2" X 48": Home Improvement
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  8. #2608
    unrooted
    Reputation: unrooted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,195
    I wonder what a lock washer on the bolt may do. . .???
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  9. #2609
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by albertdc View Post
    What about a liner or sleave to distribute the pressure of the bolt along a wider area on the receiver? Maybe even just a thin metal plate slipped in along the top of the bike rack hitch will be enough. There is usually some space/play there, so I'm sure you could fit it. I just don't know if it would be stiff enough to actually help, but it would be worth trying.
    That's why I was suggesting even a piece of leather. The idea is to fill the gap in the angle and get more surface area. The only purpose of the ball is to keep the tongue in the receiver, it's not load bearing.

    J.

  10. #2610
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I can try to mark the bolt.

    I already know that the hitch bar is coming loose because I now have one of those stops that go around the hitch bar, but I don't put my rack all the way up against the hitch stop (because it's a 1.25 rack with the 2" converter on it and) because if I do then my handlebar hits the back of my truck, after I drive a ways it loosens up and moves forward into the hitch stop. i use the Velcro strap, which is plenty strong enough to keep the rack on the truck.

    I took a picture of the inside of the receiver and there are several indentations from the ball, so maybe my receiver is just made of too soft of steel, not sure if there's a fix for that, except a new hitch receiver. . . sucks.
    Hmmm. Couple thoughts.

    If you can put it in the same spot and keep using the same "dent" it should help keep it in place.

    Is there a chance there's a high spot in the corner of the receiver opposite the ball such that the hitch bar sits on a point instead of a line?

    Does the hitch bar rock or move at all when you tighten it up initially? It should be rock solid from the get go.

    Strange stuff
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  11. #2611
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by IP_Ale View Post






    Very excited to finally have a "real" bike transport solution (no more cramming bike inside an old Prius), and a new car to put it on! Love this rack.
    Any idea what size of u lock that is? I am wanting to do the same thing but curious about what size? Thanks for any help.

  12. #2612
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    206
    yeah im using a toyota 4runner's stock 2" hitch.

    there is rust on the outside, so i bet there's got to be rust on the inside. any idea what i can use to clean it?

    when i say play, there's like 1/8" of play up/down and side/side. im just nitpicking but i figured most would be ok with it. the lever that tilts the rack is difficult to depress, but thats probably cuz it's pretty new.

  13. #2613
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    408
    Spray the inside of the receiver with WD-40, It'll help with rust.

    Play in the receiver tube is soley the hitch makers responsibility. I had play in my previous 4Runner Toyota receiver, but my VW Touareg receiver is nearly spot on, almost to tight to insert the 1up rack. One spin of the securing bolt and it's tight, with no play whatsoever.

  14. #2614
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by carlbren21 View Post
    Any idea what size of u lock that is? I am wanting to do the same thing but curious about what size? Thanks for any help.
    I believe that is the Kryptonite Evolution U lock. There are three versions with a 5". 7" or 9" long shackle. Here's the 9" version from REI.

  15. #2615
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I can try to mark the bolt.

    I already know that the hitch bar is coming loose because I now have one of those stops that go around the hitch bar, but I don't put my rack all the way up against the hitch stop (because it's a 1.25 rack with the 2" converter on it and) because if I do then my handlebar hits the back of my truck, after I drive a ways it loosens up and moves forward into the hitch stop. i use the Velcro strap, which is plenty strong enough to keep the rack on the truck.
    How far do you put the hitch in the receiver? I think the 2" converter piece has to be inside the receiver with something like at least 1" clearance from the outside end per 1UpUSA. If it's not in far enough, then it's possible that the rack is acting like a lever and levering the whole thing out as the rack is moved up and down by the terrain. Try putting the rack in farther and then not putting a bike on the closest slot to the car if the handlebars are interfering (or turn them). Not recommending this as a permanent solution but as a test. In other words, get the rack in the receiver farther and load it up and see what happens.

    If this works, then it's like that the hitch receiver is too far under the bumper. You can either get an extender or find a hitch that isn't tucked so far underneath. This will introduce more sway from the two additional joints but you should/might be able to take a lot of that out with some of the anti-rattle bolts available like this.

    I took a picture of the inside of the receiver and there are several indentations from the ball, so maybe my receiver is just made of too soft of steel, not sure if there's a fix for that, except a new hitch receiver. . . sucks.
    Can you provide this picture? Please insert a tape measure into the receiver if you can to see some depth perspective.

    J

  16. #2616
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tonyride1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    527
    The slider on one of the arms is slipping and is loosening the arm and I don't know how to fix it. The other side didn't move a bit but the one side would slide about half and inch. Just enough to loosen up the bike but not enough to allow the bike to fall out. I have the earlier version where the slide is smooth (no teeth). Any suggestions?
    2013 Giant Trance X 29er 0
    2015 Motobecane Sturgis Bullet
    2015 Giant AnyRoad 1
    2016 Diamondback Catch 2

  17. #2617
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post

    If this works, then it's like that the hitch receiver is too far under the bumper. You can either get an extender or find a hitch that isn't tucked so far underneath. This will introduce more sway from the two additional joints but you should/might be able to take a lot of that out with some of the anti-rattle bolts available like this.
    J
    ... or get a 2 to 1-1/4 adapter since you need to get down to 1-1/4 anyway.



    I like this hitch tightener if you go this way. Simple and dead nuts solid.

    Hitch Tightener - Stabilizer | StowAway2.com

    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  18. #2618
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    ... or get a 2 to 1-1/4 adapter since you need to get down to 1-1/4 anyway.
    I like the looks of that stabilizer but it's going to be a pain to put on compared to the rack.

    There is no need to go down to the 1.25" on the rack tongue. It's a bolted on piece that he'd have to take off but wouldn't need to otherwise.

    Hopefully, we get to the bottom of this problem and hopefully, the receiver isn't tucked way under the bumper. I can see why a factory receiver might do this but when it comes to bike racks, it's not a "feature."

    J.

  19. #2619
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    I like the looks of that stabilizer but it's going to be a pain to put on compared to the rack.
    It goes on and off fairly fast, but yeah, doing it every day wouldn't be great. But if he wanted to leave an adapter in all the time it's very solid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    There is no need to go down to the 1.25" on the rack tongue. It's a bolted on piece that he'd have to take off but wouldn't need to otherwise.
    I thought he said he other car was 1-1/4"...
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  20. #2620
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    It goes on and off fairly fast, but yeah, doing it every day wouldn't be great. But if he wanted to leave an adapter in all the time it's very solid.



    I thought he said he other car was 1-1/4"...
    I suppose he could leave the adaptor in all the time. I shudder to think what my shins would look like. It's bad enough when I forget to take out the regular trailer hitch piece from the receiver.

    J.

  21. #2621
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    265
    Got my new rack.
    1up Quick Rack Quick Review.-fullsizerender-1-.jpg
    It does not look as bad in real life

  22. #2622
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,036
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    USA!! USA!! USA!!! Ok, seriously though, we as a nation are RIDICULOUSLY behind the rest of the world when it comes to weights and measures. I work manufacturing, and ALL modern machinery is metric, even most equipment made in USA.. BUT not all consumer items are, and the English thread standard is extremely prevalent in older equipment and machines still, so it's far from dead.
    It's expensive to retool a shop to build in metric, cutters, drills, taps, dies, bolts, etc. Plus, you have to maybe strong-arm some engineers to adapt to it, as well as the machinists and toolmakers. Maybe in another 50 years.
    Using metric allen sizes vs. english has nothing to do with tooling, it is simply a choice between wanting to use a metric or english allen wrench. No biker is going to have english sized allen wrenches with them, but every rider who has a tool kit for their bike would have a metric allen wrench.

    I did post this question on their FB page, and they replied "because american made", which is not the correct response. The correct response would be "we didn't think about the end user when selecting the hardware, but realize it would have been a much better choice for us to utilize hardware that could be adjusted w/ tools every biker should have w/ them".

  23. #2623
    unrooted
    Reputation: unrooted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,195
    If that's the reason then why is the adapter put on with a metric bolt???
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  24. #2624
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Using metric allen sizes vs. english has nothing to do with tooling, it is simply a choice between wanting to use a metric or english allen wrench. No biker is going to have english sized allen wrenches with them, but every rider who has a tool kit for their bike would have a metric allen wrench.

    I did post this question on their FB page, and they replied "because american made", which is not the correct response. The correct response would be "we didn't think about the end user when selecting the hardware, but realize it would have been a much better choice for us to utilize hardware that could be adjusted w/ tools every biker should have w/ them".
    The use of standard bolts is really annoying and almost kept me from ordering just out of principal. My rack is attached to a car that uses metric hardware, and holds a bike that is metric. The rack should be the same!

    Agreed, it has nothing to do with the small cost to upgrade taps etc. I think the reality is that it would be a huge annoyance for them to switch now and have to support both metric and standard versions going forward. So instead they say "american made" while in hindsight secretly wishing they had started out metric

  25. #2625
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    408
    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Using metric allen sizes vs. english has nothing to do with tooling, it is simply a choice between wanting to use a metric or english allen wrench. .
    Simply not true. But, since you don't mill, drill, grind, and work a lathe cutting metal for a living in a production manufacturing plant, you wouldn't know that.

    Using an English vs metric size hand tool has EVERYTHING to do with the production tooling, and machinery used to manufacture the finished goods. Did you know that even though a 1/4-20 bolt is .250 inches in diameter (nominal) that a metric 6X1mm bolt is ALMOST the same diameter (.236 inches diameter), but neither would fit the screw thread of the other, and each requires a different tap drill size and a different tap!!! Repeat this for the DOZENS of different English and metric bolts thread sizes!!! It costs a lot of money the make things metric if your manufacturing plant is only tooled for making things in English thread sizes!!

    If a small manufacturer ( and 1up USA is a small manufacturer, and probably outsources a lot of their work to other small manufacturing shops) isn't already tooled for metric, you can count on them NOT going metric. Only if they wanted to start selling their product overseas, they would have to bend.. Even the Brits are metric, even if they do drive on the wrong side of the road.

  26. #2626
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,036
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    Simply not true.
    So I cannot source a 1/4-20 flat head screw that uses a metric allen wrench for fastening?

  27. #2627
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Killroy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    908
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    Simply not true. But, since you don't mill, drill, grind, and work a lathe cutting metal for a living in a production manufacturing plant, you wouldn't know that.

    Using an English vs metric size hand tool has EVERYTHING to do with the production tooling, and machinery used to manufacture the finished goods. Did you know that even though a 1/4-20 bolt is .250 inches in diameter (nominal) that a metric 6X1mm bolt is ALMOST the same diameter (.236 inches diameter), but neither would fit the screw thread of the other, and each requires a different tap drill size and a different tap!!! Repeat this for the DOZENS of different English and metric bolts thread sizes!!! It costs a lot of money the make things metric if your manufacturing plant is only tooled for making things in English thread sizes!!

    If a small manufacturer ( and 1up USA is a small manufacturer, and probably outsources a lot of their work to other small manufacturing shops) isn't already tooled for metric, you can count on them NOT going metric. Only if they wanted to start selling their product overseas, they would have to bend.. Even the Brits are metric, even if they do drive on the wrong side of the road.
    I don't agree with that. 1Up buys their fasteners from a manufacture that probably does more business in metric.

    That leaves the taps winch are small cheap and consumable.
    Ford trucks started switching to metric in the early 90s and I think they finished in '99.

  28. #2628
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by Killroy View Post
    I don't agree with that. 1Up buys their fasteners from a manufacture that probably does more business in metric.

    That leaves the taps winch are small cheap and consumable.
    Ford trucks started switching to metric in the early 90s and I think they finished in '99.
    Equally as big is the employee mindset. I work at a manufacring company that does largeish one off jobs and when we get the rare metric job in the guys on the floor kick and scream the whole time.

  29. #2629
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by Killroy View Post
    I don't agree with that. 1Up buys their fasteners from a manufacture that probably does more business in metric.

    That leaves the taps winch are small cheap and consumable.
    Ford trucks started switching to metric in the early 90s and I think they finished in '99.
    Why do you think it took Ford 10 years to do it? Changing out the mfg lines, spare parts inventory, and service tooling. Changing over a factory is a major big deal. Been there, done that.

    J.

  30. #2630
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    408
    @jonshanda
    Nope. A 1/4-20 Flathead screw will use an English sized hex wrench (Allen is a brand name for hex wrenches). A M6x1 Flathead screw will use a metric hex wrench. It's that simple.

    If you wanted a mix and match (Metric thread/English wrench or vice versa), that would be some crazy custom automatic screw machine header job to make those fasteners.

  31. #2631
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    408
    Quote Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
    Equally as big is the employee mindset. I work at a manufacring company that does largeish one off jobs and when we get the rare metric job in the guys on the floor kick and scream the whole time.
    Also what I have experienced in other plants.... Personally , every machine i work with is either Japanese, Chinese, or German. All metric and not an English standard to be found.

    When a manufactured good is DESIGNED, that's when the decision to use metric or English standards is made. Sometimes the material the fastener is made of means it is available in English, but not readily available in metric (example 17-7 stainless cap screws). Sometimes the cost of sourcing is the primary reason for one over the other and not-up-to-date common sense. If they can save a few dollars per rack times 100's or 1000's of bike racks that's a lot of dollars of profit. It all boils down to dollars and cents.

  32. #2632
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    97
    Just FYI, I have been involved with the design and manufacturing of steel fabricated stuff for decades. Metric fasteners and taps/dies are readily available in the US and have been for a long time. Honestly, for a bicycle accessory there is no excuse not to use metric hardware, since it's a real convenience for the customer who typically will have metric tools. Where the domestic industry is lagging, with some reason, is switching to metric-sized raw materials. Rolled, drawn and extruded shapes like tubing (and hitch receivers), as well as sheet and plate stock are still manufactured in inch and US gauge thicknesses. That's because the tooling to manufacture this material is huge and expensive (think giant rolls in a steel mill), not just a few hundred dollars in taps and dies, or new sockets. Speaking of sockets, I think the whole world still uses 1/4", 3/8" etc inch-sized square drives.

    That said, buy the right sized allen wrench and spray paint it orange, keep it in the glove box and it's not a big deal.

  33. #2633
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    300
    NINJA

    I just ordered my 2nd expansion, so now I will have the 1 1/4" rack with 2 expansions for 3 bike hauling badassness, so the whole family can go without putting the smallest bike in the car.
    Last edited by Antikid; 07-06-2015 at 07:58 PM.

  34. #2634
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    Quote Originally Posted by Antikid View Post
    I have read some talk about the bolts possibly shearing off with bikes on the expansions.
    I have never heard of this happening. Is this conjecture or did it actually happen?

    J.

  35. #2635
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    300
    I think I saw it in this thread. I could have made it up though!

    I am paranoid sometimes about really stupid things...

  36. #2636
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thickfog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,267
    Quote Originally Posted by Antikid View Post
    I think I saw it in this thread. I could have made it up though!

    I am paranoid sometimes about really stupid things...
    I think you saw the one about the arm bolts shearing. Seemed rare.
    CRAMBA Chairman

  37. #2637
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    408
    [QUOTE=Antikid;12067611 I just ordered my 2nd expansion, so now I will have the 1 1/4" rack with 2 expansions, so the whole family can go without putting the smallest bike in the car.

    I messaged 1up, if they say anything, I will update the post.[/QUOTE]

    I believe the 1-1/4" rack is limited to 3 bikes. I only have the single 1-up and the max was 2 add-ons (3 bikes total). I thought only the 2" receiver 2 bike carrier could have 4 bikes total I might be wrong about it but check it out.

  38. #2638
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    300
    I will ninja edit my worry filled post. 1up told me to not think about it and haul/ride!

    Once I get the last add-on I will have 3 bike spots, not 4 on the 1 1/4 rack. sorry for the confusion

  39. #2639
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigflamingtaco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    290
    Max is two trays added to whatever rack you bought.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  40. #2640
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,036
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    @jonshanda
    Nope. A 1/4-20 Flathead screw will use an English sized hex wrench (Allen is a brand name for hex wrenches). A M6x1 Flathead screw will use a metric hex wrench. It's that simple.

    If you wanted a mix and match (Metric thread/English wrench or vice versa), that would be some crazy custom automatic screw machine header job to make those fasteners.
    That is what I was thinking, but didn't know forsure. I quick scan of Fastenal and McMaster provided me insight.

    I really don't mean to dog on 1up for their choice, but it would just make common sense to me. I have only had to adjust the rack a few times, but seeing as I have no real use for english hex wrenches, it was a pita to find the right size.

  41. #2641
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    300
    everyone loves pics!


  42. #2642
    discombobulated SuperModerator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,214
    Quote Originally Posted by edthesped View Post
    Equally as big is the employee mindset. I work at a manufacring company that does largeish one off jobs and when we get the rare metric job in the guys on the floor kick and scream the whole time.
    I did Mfging for a long time. machine building - automation. Never a big deal to a professional : metric-v-SAE...

    Not my favorite, but not different making stuff either way, it's all numbers...


    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    Simply not true. But, since you don't mill, drill, grind, and work a lathe cutting metal for a living in a production manufacturing plant, you wouldn't know that.

    Using an English vs metric size hand tool has EVERYTHING to do with the production tooling, and machinery used to manufacture the finished goods. Did you know that even though a 1/4-20 bolt is .250 inches in diameter (nominal) that a metric 6X1mm bolt is ALMOST the same diameter (.236 inches diameter), but neither would fit the screw thread of the other, and each requires a different tap drill size and a different tap!!! Repeat this for the DOZENS of different English and metric bolts thread sizes!!! It costs a lot of money the make things metric if your manufacturing plant is only tooled for making things in English thread sizes!!

    If a small manufacturer ( and 1up USA is a small manufacturer, and probably outsources a lot of their work to other small manufacturing shops) isn't already tooled for metric, you can count on them NOT going metric. Only if they wanted to start selling their product overseas, they would have to bend.. Even the Brits are metric, even if they do drive on the wrong side of the road.
    I can only count on this : people who claim to know about making stuff because they read it on the internet.

    I have never worked in a machine shop where they didn't have the basics for metric.
    Turning a piece to 1.250 is as easy as turning a piece 1.181 (30mm).
    Having an assortment of metric taps is nothing to a real machine shop.

    I imagine the whole thing is driven by the end user.
    US made stuff is made SAE because 'that's how 'Merica does it', not because of some "prohibitive tooling cost".

  43. #2643
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,366
    I'm a big 1up supporter, but really wish they'd done the original design in metric fasteners--big mistake using inch as far as I'm concerned. If they changed now it would be a mess since your newly purchased add-on could have different fasteners than your original base rack. They'd almost have to change to an all-new series.
    whatever...

  44. #2644
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,714
    Has anyone used the rack with a 20 inch wheel bike? I'm camping this weekend, and want to use it for my brother's Dahon folding bike. The 1Up site says it works fine on 16 up to 29 inches.

    If so, could you post a photo? I'd like to see how it looks.

  45. #2645
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by steadite View Post
    I'm a big 1up supporter, but really wish they'd done the original design in metric fasteners--big mistake using inch as far as I'm concerned.
    I really don't get the whining... the only fasteners I touch are the tamper-resistant bolts where you use the 1up-suppplied tool and the wheel spacers that will use either a 1/2" or 13mm wrench just fine?
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  46. #2646
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer View Post
    Has anyone used the rack with a 20 inch wheel bike? I'm camping this weekend, and want to use it for my brother's Dahon folding bike. The 1Up site says it works fine on 16 up to 29 inches.

    If so, could you post a photo? I'd like to see how it looks.
    Old pictures, but the pink bike is a 20er. Looks like I had the wheel spacer at the 5th hole from the end...



    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  47. #2647
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    300
    finished.

  48. #2648
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    408
    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    I really don't get the whining... the only fasteners I touch are the tamper-resistant bolts where you use the 1up-suppplied tool and the wheel spacers that will use either a 1/2" or 13mm wrench just fine?
    I agree. I have to use mixed fastener systems on a daily basis. Not a big deal. Just have the appropriate tool.

  49. #2649
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    12
    what do you guys think of using a security chain like this:
    Security Maxx Chain 3/8

    I have carbon wheels so I would need to lock up the front and rear wheels along with the frame. I was thinking of getting 2 x 10 ft chains with a two bike setup, one going from the hitch through the rear wheels, and through the frames back to the hitch. The other going from the hitch through the front wheels, and through the frames back to the hitch. Overkill? these security chains seem better than the cables.

    or perhaps even just 1 x 15 ft chain attached to a ulock at the hitch

  50. #2650
    rdb
    rdb is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    299
    A chain offers the best security. I use a Kryptonite New York Noose 1213. The benefit of a noose chain is it doesn't have to be as long. The New York noose is 4.25 feet long and weighs 10.55 lbs, 12 mm links. The chain you are looking at is 10 mm links so will still be pretty heavy per foot. 15 ft of chain is going to weigh a lot and be hard to route through the wheels/frame/hitch.

    I "noose" the chain around the top tube and lock the free end of the chain to the hitch. Ulocks for the wheels. Three keys to worry about which is the down side.

    In your case, I would get a noose for one bike and then two short pieces of chain to tie the wheels and the frame of the second bike to the first bike. If you don't buy kryptonite chains and buy from the company in your post, make sure you get the chain covers for the chains. There are other bicycle lock companies than Kryptonite. You may want to check out Abus.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •