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  1. #1
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    Wheelset for xc rush?

    Just got an 07 rush 3z for East Tn trail riding. It came with Mavic Crossland UST that seem to be around 1900 gram wheels. Coming off of a F3 hard tail it feels a little heavy. What would be a good wheelset to shed some weight? I ride mostly xc and don't do any big drops, but I tip the scales at about 194 with my winter, off season fat.

  2. #2
    Pogo Lover
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    I have an 06 rush 1000 came with the crosslands, still ride with the crosslands, love the crosslands. super stiff, super reliable, taken it off 4ft drops and several 20mph off camber loose turns and they held up superbly. im extremely happy with them. now if someone gave me a set of crossmax slr's id take them.

  3. #3
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    what budget were you thinking? crossmax sl's would be nice, but if that's a bit much I'd consider something like the Shimano XT wheelset. UST and around 1650g I think. There's also several very nice DT Swiss wheelsets I could recommend; check their site.

  4. #4
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    Budget is most bang for the buck. I've got krysrium sl's on my road bike and like them, although a broken spoke took me out of a century last year. I'll check into the 2 suggestions. What about building a custom set? What components (rim, hub, # of spokes). I have an old timer ace wheel builder that said he would lace some up for me, but where do you start. I don't think he would charge me to lace them, but would I have more in components than buying a built wheel.

  5. #5
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    That depends on the wheel, but I would personally use your local guy for custom, or Chainreactioncycles.com for my next suggestion (they're in UK but do great service for US folks, and free shipping over $300). I think the ultimate with all things considered would be the Hope Pro 2 hub laced to DT swiss 4.2d rims. user mccoine has them on his rush, look around for pics. If you want a true UST setup, then substitute mavic xm819 rims or Stan's ztr olympic for uber-light race hoops. Me? I'd go with the Hope Pro 2/dt swiss 4.2d combo I mentioned, probably 28h. good luck!

  6. #6
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    oh, and check this place for pre-built clearance deals:
    http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com/

  7. #7
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    Congrats on the 3z

    Before trying pick up 300grams with new wheels, what are you running for tires?

    There can easily be an extra pound of rubber rolling around on many set-ups. The crosslands are decent wheels and it will take $500+ to get something in the 1600 gram range, but sometimes a quick tire change can pick up more weight.

    Just a thought.

    Steve

  8. #8
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    Good thought on tires. I'm running Maxxis crossmark tubeless. From what I've researched they are about 610g. Is that light?

  9. #9
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    Crossmarks Tubeless are advertized by Maxxis as 690 grams, that seems correct after having measured my set on a scale. For tubeless tires that is reasonably light, most tubeless tires are heavier.

    You can save weight by using normal tires combined with light inner tubes, or use normal tires and Stan's tubeless conversion kit. This way you can a lot of weight (f.i. a Schwalbe Furious Fred 26x1.9 is advertized as a mere 300 grams a piece, less then halve of the Crossmark) but then you might be left with very skinny tires that are much more prone to leaks and that might not have enough profile for your kind if riding.

    Regarding wheels I would go for a nice light handbuild set of wheels using light rims such as DT4.2D or Mavix XC717Disk laced with DT competition or Aerolite spokes and good hubs. You can spend a fortune of light hubs, but as this does not greatly effect the rotational weight of the wheel, you can save some money there.

    Another option would be to try to trade in you current wheelset now that is still new on a better Mavic set, like the Crossmax ST.

  10. #10
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    I also have the Crossmarks on my new Rush, and it has yet to be ridden so I have no idea how they actually perform, however based on their weight I will probably switch them out at some point for something lighter. Based on how the tread looks, I think they might disagree with my local New England trails, but that is just based on looks.

    I am having Kenda Karmas (around 500grams each) put on my wife’s Rush along with Crosstrails (I don’t think the Crossland is made anymore). We’ll see.

    Steve

  11. #11
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    My first outing on the Rush was in cold conditions with portions of the trail crunchy with a little bit of frost. The crossmarks impressed me with traction on dirt and rock. Wow..690g is a lot and might explain the feeling of turning more weight than I'm used to. I wrote off the feeling to the fact that I was now on full suspension. The hardtail I came off of had a comparable set of wheels but I bet the tires are lighter. I'm not interested in trying any type of tubeless set-up with out ust tires. Bad past experience involving: curve, high speed, 2 foot drop in curve, collapsed side wall, burped air, me on ground still clipped in holding on to the bars. I can attest that it's not the speed that hurts, its the sudden stop.

  12. #12
    mad aussie
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    Remember that the 690g weight of a tubeless tire does not include a tube. A regular tube is close to 200g in weight, so it would be the same as a 500g regular tire, plus tube, which isnt that heavy.

    IMO the Crosslands are not only heavy, but also flexy, due to the low spoke count. My team mate uses them for training because when he goes to his Crossmax SLR for races his bike feels so much faster! I would suggest looking into the Cross Trail wheelset, its stiffer than the Crossland, about 200g lighter, but not nearly as pricy as the Cross Max.

    I usually run my self built wheelset of DT Swiss/Lefty hubs with Sapim CXRay Spokes and DT 4.2d rims 32, 3 cross. They weigh in just under 1500g complete, and I use the DT conversion kit to run tubeless. Bear in mind I weigh in at only 140lb so I can run super light spokes. A heavier rider would be better off with 14/15 spokes which would add a few grams but make the wheel stiffer.

    Kevin

  13. #13
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    Along the same lines here, where can you buy a Cannondale Lefty hub online? I would like to get a custom wheelset built and figure I could supply the necessary Lefty hub. The stock wheels I could keep as a backup set then.

    Also, what do DT Swiss 4.2d rims come in at weight-wise?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by squads
    Along the same lines here, where can you buy a Cannondale Lefty hub online? I would like to get a custom wheelset built and figure I could supply the necessary Lefty hub. The stock wheels I could keep as a backup set then.

    Also, what do DT Swiss 4.2d rims come in at weight-wise?
    You should be able to get a Lefty hub from any Cannondale dealer, I purchased one last year, over here (Netherlands) they are about Euro 120. Or source a used lefty wheel on Ebay for less and use the lefty hub. Or get one online http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...x?ModelID=7265

    A DTswiss 4.2D rim is about 400 grams, about the same as a Mavic XC717D, but I believe the DT rim is somewhat wider so better suited for wider tires. However, I use Schwalbe 2.25 tires on my 717s without any problems.

  15. #15
    mad aussie
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    Its not the weight of the Maxxis tubeless tires that make them slow, but the fact that the stiff casing adds to rolling resistance. I dont have the data with me right now, but there was a study done in Germany that found the the Maxxis tubeless had twice the rolling resistance of their standard tires converted to tubeless! On the plus side they are hard wearing, puncture and cut resistant so I use them a lot for epic rides and training rides here in Arizona where sharp rocks and high speed trails combine to make a challenging environment for tires. I ran some Exception series converted to tubeless and they were a lot faster, but cut easily as the casing was fragile. I will probably run the Python Tubeless Ready for 24 Hours in the Old Pueblo and put the Crossmarks back on for training again.

    Kevin

  16. #16
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    Yeah, I built up some hope pro2/dtswiss 4.2/dt comp. spokes/alloy nipples for just under $500 and they come in at about 1675g. I saved some money because I built them myself though. Great bang for the buck.


  17. #17
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    Great job on wheelset mcoine. 1675gr....good weight. How stiff are they? Have you ridden them? How do they compare to my stock crosslands besides being a ton lighter?

  18. #18
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    Yeah I've done maybe 10 rides on them.. no issues. I've never used mavic wheels, so I can't compare them.


  19. #19
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    2nd ride out on the 07 Rush 3z and really put it through the paces. Right out of the truck climbed for 5 miles (Clemmer trail in Ocoee Tn). How can this bike climb so well with a wheelset that is 1900+grams (mavic crosslands). I glanced at my computer several times to see 8 to 9 mph. After 6 miles (maybe 1/2 mile down hill or flat), we had averaged 5.8 mph. I may stick with these crosslands for a while to get used to them and then throw something lighter on and reap the benefits. This 15 mile ride was 75% climbing then a swift trail to the bottom of the mtn. I think we rode the entire mtn going up and came straight down. I had a 28.2 mph top speed down a hill littered with water bars. Coming off a KTM 400sx with professionally set up suspension, I was impressed with the stability of the rush at sucking up water bars at speed. I think the pucker factor on the first water bar on a scale of 1-10 was an 11. I think I fell in love with the rush Satuday!

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