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  1. #1
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    What remains of Bedford plant

    Anyone aware of what bikes, if any, are coming out of the Bedford PA manufacturing facility?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhorvati
    Anyone aware of what bikes, if any, are coming out of the Bedford PA manufacturing facility?
    For 2010, some of the CAAD 9 road bikes, and some of the Aluminum Flash hardtails, that is it. I am pretty sure that manufacturing has ended there because the 2011's are all made in Taiwan and we should see 2011's popping up in a month or so.

    Bedford will be used primarily for Warranty service.

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    Thanks for the update. I purchased my Rize at the end of last year anticipating it to be my last Cannondale knowing the end of US manufacturing was near for them. Thankfully the offerings from other domestic companies has improved at a very rapid rate. When the times comes in a few years to replace the Rize, it will be Cannondale's competition that I will be looking at.

  4. #4
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    The domestic manufacturers that are left are technically not Cannondale's competition. They are so small scale that any business they get from guys like you will not affect their bottom line. There are Cannondale customers that value innovation and Cannondale customers that valued the Handmade in USA aspect. The latter group is relatively small compared to the former (think Americans vs the rest of the world).

    As for bedford they are currently doing the following:

    Finishing 2010 production for alloy frames.
    Finishing assembly of 2010 bikes.
    Starting assembly of 2011 bikes.
    Building all Lefty's.
    Performing testing and qualifying all frames and components for CSG.
    Customer Service, inside sales, and tech support.
    There are other things that I am sure I am missing.

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    I'm a customer that values innovation that is built in the USA. I don't buy products to feel like I belong to some larger demographic. If I once bought a product from company A and then bought a similar product from company B, the two companies are competitors. Doesn't matter if they realize it or not.

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    I understand your logic, but to give a counter analogy...If I tried to run a 100m against Usain Bolt I would certainly be a competitor. He undoubtedly would kick my ass so bad that I would be no competition for him. Do you see what I mean by saying they are NOT Cannondale competition? Sure they make bikes (and probably good ones), but they are not in the same category of volume, technology, and innovation.

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    rhorvati: I think along the same lines as you. There are other options...I was going to buy a Rize, but went with a Titus instead. Will it affect Cannondale? not likely...Does it make me feel better?...absolutely!

    We can only hope for poetic justice that mr ronald's is the next position offshored.
    whatever...

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    Ohh yeah...I hope so. I'd love to work in Taiwan.

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    [QUOTE=bad ronald]The domestic manufacturers that are left are technically not Cannondale's competition. They are so small scale that any business they get from guys like you will not affect their bottom line. There are Cannondale customers that value innovation and Cannondale customers that valued the Handmade in USA aspect. The latter group is relatively small compared to the former (think Americans vs the rest of the world).

    BR,

    To be a devil's advoate, what about Trek? According to a source at Trek:

    For our 2010 line-up, all of our OCLV carbon bikes are produced at our factory in Waterloo, WI. These bikes include the following models:

    Top Fuel 9.8 and 9.9
    Fuel EX 9.8 and 9.9
    Remedy 9.8 and 9.9
    Elite 9.9 SSL

    However, I don't know about 2011.

  10. #10
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    Trek's volume allows them to keep making high end stuff (and only high end). I am sure there is a good amount of Asian made widgets in those American made frames though.

    There is a large amount of duties tied to importing of high end good into America. This is why assembly in the USA will still happen from Trek, Specialized and Cannondale. The cost of their product is too high to justify importing the whole bike. Trek's pricing is such that they can take a lower margin on high end stuff and save on import duties to make up the difference. I would still bet that they subsidize that business with low end imported product though. I don't work for Trek so don't quote me on that

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad ronald
    Ohh yeah...I hope so. I'd love to work in Taiwan.
    ...and earning the local professional wage: $8/hour

    Good luck buying one of your $5000 bikes on that salary!
    whatever...

  12. #12
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    Don't need to worry about that! I'd be working in the bike industry You can hate on Asia manufacturing all you like however it is an honest truth that 90% of everything you touch was probably made there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bad ronald
    They are so small scale that any business they get from guys like you will not affect their bottom line.
    "Guys like us?" Then why did you resurrect the Jekyll name? Why? I'll tell you why; to try to lure back some of "guys like us", that's why.

    Quote Originally Posted by bad ronald
    There are Cannondale customers that value innovation and Cannondale customers that valued the Handmade in USA aspect.
    And there are former Cannondale customers that can get BOTH innovation AND Handmade in USA elsewhere.

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    I am sure the new Cannondale bikes will be good bikes but so are pretty much all the other options.... for me not being made in the US just leveled the playing field, and without that perk I bought my fist none Cannondale.



    Quote Originally Posted by rhorvati
    I'm a customer that values innovation that is built in the USA. I don't buy products to feel like I belong to some larger demographic. If I once bought a product from company A and then bought a similar product from company B, the two companies are competitors. Doesn't matter if they realize it or not.

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    It is sad that we are giving our jobs to other countries. The wage imbalance is a temporary (10 year or less) cost advantage. Japan used to be cheap. Then Korea was the cheap place with a skilled work force. Now it's China. But China is under intense internal pressure to increase wages and build their middle class. There have been strikes and factories have been shut down. When wage increases and other costs take affect that China does not incur now (think pollution control and hazardous waste disposal), the prices will be higher, but we will be out of work because we are not putting shovels into the ground. We are not welding frames or manufacturing components. We are reducing ourselves to middlemen.

    This country used to be the manufacturing power house of the world. We are still "in the game", but we need to expand our manufacturing, especially today. Mixing labor with resources creates real wealth.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglecat

    To be a devil's advoate, what about Trek? According to a source at Trek:

    For our 2010 line-up, all of our OCLV carbon bikes are produced at our factory in Waterloo, WI. These bikes include the following models:

    Top Fuel 9.8 and 9.9
    Fuel EX 9.8 and 9.9
    Remedy 9.8 and 9.9
    Elite 9.9 SSL

    However, I don't know about 2011.
    Do you have any idea how few of those bikes that they sell? That is a niche market for Trek.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Lee
    I am sure the new Cannondale bikes will be good bikes but so are pretty much all the other options.... for me not being made in the US just leveled the playing field, and without that perk I bought my fist none Cannondale.
    A few years ago when you were buying a Cannondale you used to get the feeling that you were getting something else, something special. Not anymore.

    Now I feel like I'm looking at a Specialized. The magic is gone.

    And it sucks cause I know the bikes are better than ever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 69erSycip
    Do you have any idea how few of those bikes that they sell? That is a niche market for Trek.
    I can't say I know how many of these bikes they sell. I'm sure its a small part of their business when you consider how large they are, but I think they make a lot of carbon bikes for the US and export than you think. The only reason that I brought it up is that Bad Ronald said "the domestic manufacturers that are left are technically not Cannondale's competition. They are so small scale that any business they get from guys like you will not affect their bottom line." I just know that Trek is a large company and they still make high end bikes here. One of these days I will to take a tour of their factory (if they remain here) and will try to get more info.

    I have 2 Treks and 2 Cannondales in the house. I like the Treks, love the Cannondales.

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    After giving away all of our manufacturing, at some point the people in the US are going to lose the real world knowledge of how to manufacture things. We are going to lose the ability to work and create things with our own hands and will become a nation of button pushers, iPhone twiddlers, code writers, and entertainment consumers. All of our greatest innovations started with just a couple folks dickin' around with an idea in a garage or workshop. You would be amazed at how many people I know that can't even change the spark plugs in their car and don't even know or understand basic mechanical principals.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bad ronald
    Don't need to worry about that! I'd be working in the bike industry You can hate on Asia manufacturing all you like however it is an honest truth that 90% of everything you touch was probably made there.
    Just because masses of cheap goods come from China doesn't make it the right choice nor even a good choice. There are hidden costs to cheap goods, and its clearly American jobs that are lost. Keep in mind it's more than the job, it's the taxes and all the consumer spending that is supported by that job which feeds into the local and national economy. American's have been sold a bill of goods stating goods from China are cheaper so that is good for the consumer. It's a race to the bottom. Wage inflation will force jobs out of China and into India, Africa or any other country where masses of unskilled cheap labor remains untapped.

    Don't even get me started on the very crafty business practices of Chinese companies. For such reasons I vote with my dollars and suggest other do so as well. One person clearly has no impact. But many people of the same mindset can, and have been sources for change.

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    Cannondale is actually just another company playing me-too, in the game of off shoring labor.

    Short news blip on the massive destruction of the US middle class. Keep in mind industrialization built the middle class. Outsourcing those jobs will also destroy it.

    http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/the-u.s.-middle-class-is-being-wiped-out-here%27s-the-stats-to-prove-it-520657.html?tickers=^DJI,^GSPC,SPY,MCD,WMT,XRT,DIA

  22. #22
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    So you guys are willing to pay a significantly higher price for a bike that is possibly not any better than a Taiwan bike? That would be the reality in a competitive market where prices play a significant role in sales volume.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gradstdnt_99
    Cannondale is actually just another company playing me-too, in the game of off shoring labor.

    Short news blip on the massive destruction of the US middle class. Keep in mind industrialization built the middle class. Outsourcing those jobs will also destroy it.

    http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/the-u.s.-middle-class-is-being-wiped-out-here%27s-the-stats-to-prove-it-520657.html?tickers=^DJI,^GSPC,SPY,MCD,WMT,XRT,DIA

    isnīt capitalism nice ...

    "Show your bike some love and it will show the love back."
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by hssp
    So you guys are willing to pay a significantly higher price for a bike that is possibly not any better than a Taiwan bike? That would be the reality in a competitive market where prices play a significant role in sales volume.
    thatīs the point ...
    do you really think a bike manufacturer is not able to produce a cheap frame
    in USA or euope ?
    it is possible (!) but the $ or Ä have to ...

    "Show your bike some love and it will show the love back."
    Eric, niner bikes

    the most important vehicle is a 29er bicycle

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmk
    thatīs the point ...
    do you really think a bike manufacturer is not able to produce a cheap frame
    in USA or euope ?
    it is possible (!) but the $ or Ä have to ...
    ....have to .... find qualified labor who would weld aluminium frames for 5$ an hour in the USA.


    It's mostly us who started this economical pattern with the over-consuming habits.
    The pendulum is coming back and is slapping us really hard in the face.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by fokof
    ....have to .... find qualified labor who would weld aluminium frames for 5$ an hour in the USA.


    It's mostly us who started this economical pattern with the over-consuming habits.
    The pendulum is coming back and is slapping us really hard in the face.
    yes 100% agree
    but
    sorry if i ...
    i was in june in NYC, im formerly from europe and what i saw there, please donīt get me wrong, is crazy
    i love the city
    but no economical or energy-efficiency concerns ...
    and in europe nowadays too

    "Show your bike some love and it will show the love back."
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  27. #27
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    I for one, can't wait for the day when gas is so expensive, that buying stuff from overseas, represents a loss over domestic production.

    That, and listening to all the whining idiots who bought F 350's just because, after gas finally dropped under $4 last year

    Labor may be cheap over there, but it's cheap fuel that keeps the Walmart mentality afloat.

    Bring on $6 a gallon gas, I'm ready, and Walmart needs to die.....

    Poor fellas http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news0...s_walmart.html
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    Labor may be cheap over there, but it's cheap fuel that keeps the Walmart mentality afloat.

    Bring on $6 a gallon gas, I'm ready, and Walmart needs to die.....
    +1
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  29. #29
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    $6 a gallon is still damn cheap!

    I actually think low gas prices has contributed to the death of GM. Fuel drinkers around the US (like the F350s) do not actually represent a drive to more develop fuel efficient, smaller cars for the US car manufacturers. It is like people say - their dinosaur technology only serves to pump up the gas sales.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by hssp
    It is like people say - their dinosaur technology only serves to pump up the gas sales.
    My pet cause is the Toyota HiLux.

    A Tacoma by any other name, and available in diesel.

    Imagine, a midsized, reliable 4X4 sold in the US that got 35 MPG. Nah, it'd never fly here.

    Toyota says that the market won't support it here, yet they sell like hotcakes in every country but our own.

    Anyone who can tell me with a straight face that this vehicle wouldn't be a hot commodity amongst the tens of thousands of drivers who love their Tacomas, is smoking something really good.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    My pet cause is the Toyota HiLux.

    A Tacoma by any other name, and available in diesel.

    Imagine, a midsized, reliable 4X4 sold in the US that got 35 MPG. Nah, it'd never fly here.

    Toyota says that the market won't support it here, yet they sell like hotcakes in every country but our own.

    Anyone who can tell me with a straight face that this vehicle wouldn't be a hot commodity amongst the tens of thousands of drivers who love their Tacomas, is smoking something really good.
    My pet cause is the Honda Element, a cheap ,reliable mid-size 4x4 that gets 30 mpg and is eminently adaptable to anything. I have had small motorcycles, lawnmowers , snowblowers and assorted flat packs in it, it regularly carries two bikes strapped in to the sides - a Rize and a Six - with no need to remove wheels and still leaves cargo capacity available. I've had it for six years now and I have never found anything that could replace its flexibility

    My wife loves it and her daily driver is a 2008 Porsche Targa 4

  32. #32
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    I can get 40 mpg out of my Saturn sedan. It seems like Saturn should still be around. They are simple and inexpensive to maintain and good on gas. They may not get you laid, but hey....

  33. #33
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    I just wanted to point out something, China and Taiwan are NOT the same, well Taiwan thinks so at least

    Taiwan is a democracy, China, well they are the Chicoms

    The two are not interchangeable.

    As in any discussion there are two sides to each coin, why have so many manufacturing jobs left the US? Some blame, certainly not ALL blame, can be placed on some, SOME unions, look at the UAW, their wages, benefits, and pensions are way out of control, and I'm not going to give the companies a pass either, they agreed to these outrageous contracts.

    Next lets look at the dumbing down of the workforce, I remember reading last year an article about a company that was manufacturing aircraft parts or some such thing, and they were begging for employees, they needed people with at least grade nine level math, and where having a really tough time finding applicants to fill the jobs. Sure these kids knew how to put a condom on a banana and had lots of self esteem, but they could not do grade nine level math, and these kids were high school grads

    It is not a simple black and white issue, but it sure is a shame that Cannondales are no longer made in the USA.
    To Canadians Hockey is not just a game, it's OUR Game.....!

    Go CANADA!

  34. #34
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    I found the article I was talking about............

    >> LINK <<
    To Canadians Hockey is not just a game, it's OUR Game.....!

    Go CANADA!

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu In Tokyo
    Next lets look at the dumbing down of the workforce
    All good points, well said Stu.

    Ever read "What's the matter with Kansas"?

    Political in it's direction, but the point about the dumbing down of our populace for the enrichment of the few, shines through, very good book......
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    All good points, well said Stu.

    Ever read "What's the matter with Kansas"?

    Political in it's direction, but the point about the dumbing down of our populace for the enrichment of the few, shines through, very good book......
    No I have not, I'll put it on my list of books to get and read, thanks!
    To Canadians Hockey is not just a game, it's OUR Game.....!

    Go CANADA!

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    Yes, I am willing to pay more for an item that is engineered and manufacture in the US of A. Cannondale's old tagline of "Handmade in the USA" used to be on every bike and was a reminder for the reason this brand commanded a premium. It was a good brand with a solid reputation. American flags on every bike. Now the American flags are gone and the logo quietly absent from their frames but somehow the bikes are still commanding the same premium. Offshoring labor to low cost countries is an easy way for management to extract more value out of a brand before consumers figure they are the same cheap pimped imported goods as the rest of the competition racing to the bottom of the heap.

    I honestly believe that import duties of some form should be in place. It's far too easy for companies to outsource work to other countries with no motivation to keep them here. Try having your goods imported into China and see if there is a level playing field. Free trade isn't free by any mean.

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    If I get a good run from my Rize, it will be upgraded with a later model when the time comes. It means SFA to me whether a bike is made in Taiwan or USA unless it's proven that the Taiwanese Cannondales are an inferior product, at which I will then swap brands.

    Oh, and I only drive diesel 4wd's here which is great, had Nissan Patrols, Toyota Surfs, and now an 80 Series Landcruiser

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by kavika
    Oh, and I only drive diesel 4wd's here which is great, had Nissan Patrols, Toyota Surfs, and now an 80 Series Landcruiser
    I hate you in the nicest of ways.....

    Pics please
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    I for one, can't wait for the day when gas is so expensive, that buying stuff from overseas, represents a loss over domestic production.

    That, and listening to all the whining idiots who bought F 350's just because, after gas finally dropped under $4 last year

    Labor may be cheap over there, but it's cheap fuel that keeps the Walmart mentality afloat.

    Bring on $6 a gallon gas, I'm ready, and Walmart needs to die.....
    Iím a Texan and I drive an F350 diesel dually my wife works in the oil and gas industry and I ride bikes this mentality of $6 a gallon gas will get folks on bikes is ridiculous it will hurt the poor more than anyone and itís the damn taxes that the feds put on gasoline/diesel thatís the crime not the oil companies.

    By the way these silly outdated UNIONS is what drove jobs outta the United States think about that next time your crying about jobs going overseas.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAL 9000
    Iím a Texan and I drive an F350 diesel dually my wife works in the oil and gas industry and I ride bikes this mentality of $6 a gallon gas will get folks on bikes is ridiculous it will hurt the poor more than anyone and itís the damn taxes that the feds put on gasoline/diesel thatís the crime not the oil companies.

    By the way these silly outdated UNIONS is what drove jobs outta the United States think about that next time your crying about jobs going overseas.
    I have to agree with you on most of that, I live in Tokyo Japan, we are currently paying about $6.75 US for a US gallon, and trust me, there has NOT been an increase of bicycle use
    To Canadians Hockey is not just a game, it's OUR Game.....!

    Go CANADA!

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    This is my current daily driver (on its road tyres) 1990 80 series


    My previous Nissan Safari (Patrol) which I sold to buy the LWB Cruiser


    And same Safari next to previous model I owned


    Sooooo many to choose from here, as they are Japanese Imports

  43. #43
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    Hal and Stu, I'm not so naive that I think expensive gas would make everyone flock to bikes. That's just silliness

    Folks who don't ride now, and won't be convinced to do so, likely would need to lose their license to finally discover the pleasure of fuel free two wheeled transport!

    It would however encourage folks who honestly have zero need to a 10 to 12 MPG street legal, armored personnel carrier with 3 gazzillion pounds of payload capacity to either consider more efficient conveyance, or, at a minimum, get them thinking about consolidating trips, car pooling, using public transit where practical, etc.

    Moreover, by gas getting expensive, the ability to source cheap goods from far off lands and have it be really profitable, would likely become a distant memory, at which point yes, local business would once again, be competitive and even desirable.

    As for hurting the poor, not feeling the pain. There are thousands of used, old, cheap Hondas, Toyotas, VW's etc, all getting mid 20's to low 30's without even trying hard. If some dirt poor redneck somewhere feels it's his god given right to drive a 1979 F350 and get 8 MPG, then he can just deal with it This is America after all, we have freedom of choice in our destiny, well, Stu's in Japan, I'm guessing the fleet MPG average standard's a bit higher over there, no?

    It hurts to change, but folks needing to rework their thought process, is not a convincing enough argument to keep consuming oil like it's going out of style. I miss my 16MPG Tacoma like crazy, but getting mid 40's in my VW TDI and filling up like, every three weeks, makes it hurt a bit less.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by kavika
    This is my current daily driver (on its road tyres) 1990 80 series. Sooooo many to choose from here, as they are Japanese Imports
    You suck.

    Sweet trucks.

    It drives me crazy that so many nations get these vehicles, and yet, here? They seem to think they won't sell.

    I have yet to meet a truck guy who would point blank say, no, I don't want a more efficient truck, I like getting crappy mileage, you can't make me change.....

    I'll bet even Hal would get excited if he could double his mileage and still drive the truck he likes.

    I've mentioned to a few I've struck up conversations with, that they could own a 4x4 diesel Tacoma, and get mid 30's easily, and they just get excited, then tell them they can't get them here, and watch them deflate.

    Where's here? What fortunate nation are you part of?
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  45. #45
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    Made in USA??

    I have a Cannondale F2 29er and I love the bike. It does proudly say "Handmade in the USA" on it! I bought it partially for the reputation of the Cannondale and partly becuase it was made in the USA.

    I know the entire drive train was built in TW/China, etc. as are ALL big name drivetrain parts (Shimano,SRAM, etc.). I promptly put a King hub on the rear (after blowing out 5 free hub bodies in 16 months!) and had a rear wheel professionally built by a local hand builder. The rear is a 36 hole tied and soldered,.. a real work of art and SOLID!

    I'm looking at my next bike possibly coming from Pivot (mach 429) and adapting my Lefty to it if I can get the Lefty to behave (a diff story) .

    We live in a different economy than our ancestors in that global trade lines force us to think about things locally and then globally. Taking bikes for example, the frames are built in the USA, the drivetrains in SE Asia and other parts from other places around the world. Sales of those parts keep people employed and buying other stuff from others and so on, until the entire economy of the world shrinks or grows based on shifts in consumer confidence, government interactions, global monetory policy,.. etc.

    You can try to keep the money in the hands of Americans as long as possible. Unless you're sure that company ONLY does business with other American companies, then your $$ will end up offshore at one time or another. That's the bottom line,..

    America needs to get on board and create less expensive labor to get back in the game,..or we're dead.

  46. #46
    Ridin' dirty!
    Reputation: cdalemaniac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 29erBob
    America needs to get on board and create less expensive labor to get back in the game,..or we're dead.
    Or put additional import duties/taxes on foreign made goods....Other countries do so to keep their economy afloat.....
    It's funny how oranges are constantly compared to apples or vice versa: "Your drive train is made in Asia, your TV is and so is your car"...
    I don't have a problem with companies/goods that originate in Taiwan, Japan etc.
    What I have an issue with is outsourcing, period.
    Most of the arguments I read so far are always suggesting that buying a TOYOTA truck is the same as a made in Taiwan or Japan cannondale....
    It's not as the TOYOTA truck is not an american product which originated in one country and then was made in Asia creating a loss of jobs for local workers and a bigger profit for the manufacturer!
    "Common sense isn't always that common!"
    Custom Prophet and Custom Delta V

  47. #47
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    i live in houston texas the most bike un-friendly city in the universe it just was not designed for two wheel commuting neither are a lot of american cities.

  48. #48
    Mr. Knowitall
    Reputation: hssp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAL 9000
    i live in houston texas the most bike un-friendly city in the universe it just was not designed for two wheel commuting neither are a lot of american cities.
    This city is a prime example of the American attitude: you cannot go anywhere without your car. Some of my colleagues have been stopped by the police walking home from the bar, as in Norway, we actually do not drink and drive because it is dangerous. The police then drove them back to their car for them to drive home under the influence of alcohol. When I was in Houston, I barely saw any public transportation, no taxis or any other alternative way of travel but the big trucks and all. If gas prices make people think twice about driving their cars, a natural result will be a more bike and pedestrian friendly community - over time...

  49. #49
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hssp
    If gas prices make people think twice about driving their cars, a natural result will be a more bike and pedestrian friendly community - over time...
    we have a thing in houston call humidity heck today it's only 88% feels like a cold front came through.

    http://www.wunderground.com/US/TX/Houston.html

    try riding to work in 90%+ humidity on a daily basis...

    sorry cycling is a hobby for most of us not a daily commute i'll keep my F350

  50. #50
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAL 9000
    sorry cycling is a hobby for most of us not a daily commute i'll keep my F350
    You're obviously a smart guy (meant sincerely, not snarkily), why are you trying so hard to evade my point? It's not about making cycling more predominant, it's about forcing the market to create vehicles that go farther, with less. For the life of me, I can't understand how or why we equate macho, coolness, strength, Americanness whatever, with spending more on fuel, than is really necessary, it just baffles me.

    Would the average fuel sucking driver turn on their AC in the home, then open all the windows? Doubt it. Would they turn on the heat inthe winter, and leave those windows open? Don't think so. Chances are, when we go to buy heating or cooling options, one of the biggest factors driving the decision is what costs the LEAST to run. So why do we view our cars so differently?

    Why would anyone willingly choose, (given the option) of getting 270 miles to the tank (my Tacoma), vs 525 miles to the tank, (my TDI)? Currently, because TDI's and the like are dorky little cars that some people either can't use for practical reasons, or feel emasculated while behind the wheel.

    If gas prices hit the roof, American consumers will be screaming for the car companies to get their fuel economy butts in gear. I just can't wait for it to happen.

    I want my 35MPG Tacoma dammit.......
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

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