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  1. #1
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    What length steerer tube do I need for my SuperVee?

    I want to convert my Supervee to a conventional fork. What is the minimum length steerer tube I need?

    My bike serial number is: 1D-B10302 13721
    235522 7XCA5WL

    I was told it is ~1999 SV 900
    It has XT shifters, crankarms & derailleurs

    The DD60 headshock is blown and needs to be rebuilt. LBS said no parts available so guess what: I should buy a new bike!!

    I'm impressed with the UberVee's you guys have created. Nice stuff! Please help me with some of the specs so I can zoot up my SV.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by heartfixer
    I want to convert my Supervee to a conventional fork. What is the minimum length steerer tube I need?
    It really depends on the method you choose for reducing the headtube and the stack height of your headset. With a reducing headset like the Cane Creek Double XC-short, you can get away with 8 inches, maybe less. If you use Problem Solvers headset reducers and a standard headset, you will probably need at least 9 inches. The stack height of Super V adapters or Gemini adapters (cut-down) will be even a bit greater than that of the Problem Solvers.

    Problem Solvers press into C'dale headset cups which contribute to the stack height. The Cane Creek Double XC-short and the Super V/Gemini adapters press directly into the headtube. Super V adapters are not available anymore and have become difficult to find. Gemini adapters are available but they are designed for a 20mm press depth (1.5 standard) so they must be machined down to fit the 12mm press depth of an older Cannondale headtube.

    The way to figure out how much steerer is needed is to add up the stack heights of your headtube, headtube reducers (if any), headset, stem, and any headset spacers that you plan to use. Remember that additional stack height under the headtube will slacken the geometry of the bike. IMO this is a good thing. It is also nice to have some extra room for headset spacers for fine-tuning geometry.
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  3. #3
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    Great info, thanks!

    I've noticed some of the steerer tubes on ebay listings are shorter than what you suggest. How difficult is it to install a neww steerer tube or is that getting too far out there? Some of the UberVee's have 130mm front forks on 'em. I haven't been able to locate head tube angle specs on my SV, but my question is: with a stock rear shock, what is the head tube angle if I mount a 130mm front fork? LBS said if I go longer than 80mm then I would have an "Easy Rider" type effect. I am ready to change to maybe a Marzocchi Bomber with 100 to up to 130mm travel, but I am worried about the head tube angle getting out of whack and the steerer tube being too short. Any suggestions?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by heartfixer
    How difficult is it to install a neww steerer tube or is that getting too far out there? Some of the UberVee's have 130mm front forks on 'em. I haven't been able to locate head tube angle specs on my SV, but my question is: with a stock rear shock, what is the head tube angle if I mount a 130mm front fork? LBS said if I go longer than 80mm then I would have an "Easy Rider" type effect. I am ready to change to maybe a Marzocchi Bomber with 100 to up to 130mm travel, but I am worried about the head tube angle getting out of whack and the steerer tube being too short. Any suggestions?
    Installing a new steerer tube can be done on some forks but not all. For example, Marzocchi can install a new steerer for you but it is not a DIY project. But in order to get a longer steerer on a Fox you must install entire new uppers which can be pretty expensive.

    As for the geometry of your Super V - it would be helpful if you could post a picture of your SV so we can be sure we're on the same page. The original geometry isn't really relevant anymore as the headtube angles of these bikes were way too steep by modern trailbike standards. Based on our experiences, I think you'll appreciate the slacker headtube angle from a modern trailbike fork. If I had to guess, you'll end up around 69-69.5 degrees with a 130mm Marzocchi and a conversion headset like the Cane Creek or around 68-68.if you use the Problem Solvers with a standard headset. You might also consider a fork with travel adjustability so you can steepen the headtube angle for climbing and tight trail conditions.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the reply. I will have to be careful when I buy a used fork. I have a conversion/adapter set I bought from the non-C'dale LBS ($50) I believe it is the first one pictured above(Super Vee adapters). I like Cane Creek headset. Next week I'll use the BFH and take out the old fork, test-fit the adapter set, get some preliminary measurements and see what the minimum length looks like, and then carefully make a buy on a fork. I'm tryin' to put the word out locally so I can maybe buy one on the condition it fits, etc.
    Gotta hit the sack, takin the kids to Yellowstone in the AM, just finished packin. Bike's gotta wait for a week. Thanks again.

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