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  1. #1
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    Unhappy with Rush 800

    I really like my Rush 800 for hitting technical single track and over all riding. However, I have started racing in "adventure" type triathalons(mtn, bike, trail run and kayak)and really feel like this bike is holding me back. I trained yesterday and it just seems like the bike is slow especially on climbs and even on flats. I remember when I first switched from my old Trek hardtail it seemed very slow and sluggish on climbs. I know hardtails are going to climb better but this seems to be a pretty big difference.
    So, after my training session yesterday, I'm very frustrated with this bike. I love it through rock gardens, and riding in tough, technical stuff, but I think I need a hard tail for racing.
    Now, the other part of this is I have my old Trek 830 frame which from what I've been told was the same frame used on higher end Trek hardtails at the time. I already upgraded the wheels and wheel sets . Should I go ahead and upgrade the other components, which would be everything including front fork or just buy a new hardtail for racing and training and keep my Rush for playing in the techinical stuff and turn my old Trek into a SS.
    Oh, I'm 5'10 188 lbs and the courses I'll be racing on are not very technical but has a lot of climbing and flat parts where speed is critical.
    Thanks.
    愛友誼秀麗力量激情

  2. #2
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
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    FS bike can feel quite different with different suspension setups. Have you played around with the settings? Racers tend to prefer stiffer suspension for a more efficient ride. Tire choice also plays a big roll in making a bike feel slow or fast. The stock 800 doesn't have the lightest wheels either... Just a few ideas to help make the Rush a faster bike. Remember that Tinker juarez races it often and Christoph Sauser rode a Rush to a 2nd place on the last World Cup he did while sponsored by Cannondale. The bike is not the problem. But if you race on smooth non-technical hardpack, maybe a hardtail is a good idea. If there is no bumps and rocks to activate the suspension, a suspension is pretty useless right?

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  3. #3
    mad aussie
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    The best thing I did to improve the climbing on my Rush 600 was to change out the shock for a RP23, with the pro pedal engaged the difference was night and day and I could turn it off to blast back down.
    Lighter wheels and tires can also make a noticeable difference as well, you could save yourself a pound of so of rotating weight right there.

    Kevin

  4. #4
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    Well the rush is being marketed/sold as an "all day", "24 hour" type of bike, meaning that for short fast non-technical courses it's not the best choice. Seems like you should go back to a hardtail for what you're doing.

    Well I always think more is better. If you can afford to keep 3 mountain bikes around, do it. If not sure, upgrade the trek. C'dale has some great options for hardtails, I'd also recommend Scott.
    My one says BRAP!

  5. #5
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    I have thought about upgrades for the Rush. I hate to buy another hardtail but I've been looking at upgrades for my Trek and it's going to be somewhat expensive. I really wonder if it's worth upgrading that frame.
    I thought about upgrading the rear shock as well to get the lock out feature. But then we are talking a bit of cash as well.
    I think the way these races are set up it's mainly smooth trails with little technical stuff. The last race there was only one slighty rocky section but nothing a hardtail couldn't easily handle.
    I know the Rush 800 is a great bike but I think I need a little more out of it. Upgrading it is certainly an option..hum....
    愛友誼秀麗力量激情

  6. #6
    mad aussie
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    I know where you are coming from, I found my Rush once upgraded it to be a great all day bike especially on technical and rocky trails. On faster, smoother courses it will do well, but obviously it is not what the bike is designed for. That is why I now have a Scalpel Team frame sitting in the workshop to be built up! I plan on having both built enough so that I can swap over wheels, Lefty and front brake and have the Rush for really rocky, rough courses, or long rides and the Scalpel for XC races and smoother marathon races.
    For the kind of races you are doing it sounds like the Trek is the cheapest option, although a Caffeine or especially Taurine would be really nice.......

    Kevin

  7. #7
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    Well, I like the idea of upgrading the wheels and components on the Rush to make it faster but i still wonder if it would be the ticket. These races really are about speed not so much technical ability. I thought about the Scapel but don't really want to spend that much. I'm just not sure what to do.
    愛友誼秀麗力量激情

  8. #8
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    before you do anything I'd try a simple tire swap. The stock tires aren't very good, and switching to a good rolling tire makes a huge difference.

  9. #9
    LA CHÈVRE
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    On smooth courses, a light stiff hardtail is the fastest option. A sub 20 pounds Taurine would be ideal!

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  10. #10
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    Don't upgrade the Trek 830. I don't know what year it is. But it's certainly not the same frame they used on their higher-end steel bikes. It's not upgrade worthy. Someone said the Rush was marketed as a 24-hour race bike and therefore not appropriate for shorter xc work. WRONG. The key word here is "marketed". Because of the Rush's posistion in the Cannondale lineup (above the hardtails and Scalpels) they couldn't call it a classic xc racer, for fear of treading on those other bikes' toes. The Rush is awesome. So get some lighter wheels and tires. Also, at 5'10 188 lbs, you could stand to lose a few pounds, assuming it's not all muscle. The power-to-weight ratio is the KEY factor of speed.

  11. #11
    mad aussie
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    Thinking about it a little more, the Trek is a bike based around old geometry, it might not be worth upgrading.
    My suggestion would be to first get a shock (RP23) upgrade or have your existing shock sent to Push and a lighter wheelset. If you are still not happy with the bike for racing then look at a hardtail.
    If you got a Caffeine with Lefty. at some point you could use your lightweight wheelset for racing and have the best of both worlds.

    Kevin

  12. #12
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    Psycle 151- Dude, I'm not bashing the Rush, I love the bike. I just want it to be a little more race ready.

    Flying Wombat- I think your right, I'm not going to upgrade the Trek, it's not worth it. I'm going to either upgrade my Rush or buy a hard tail.
    Thanks for the input.
    愛友誼秀麗力量激情

  13. #13
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    What ever upgrade you buy for your Trek should be easily transferable to the Rush or any other racing frameset so you should come out ahead regardless of what your ultimate racing machine.

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