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  1. #1
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    Uber or Ebay -- XL '99 Super V 2000SL

    This weekend, the headshock on my V blew a seal. It'll cost about $90 to get it fixed, but I don't think the headshock is worth it.

    I don't ride the bike much anymore (about 10 rides a year on local trails plus a trip to Tsali/Pisgah each year). I went to Snowshoe for the first time a couple of months ago and rented a Kona Stinky. I fell in love with big-bike gravity riding...WOW! I now own a lite-FR bike - 7" travel, single-pivot, 38 lbs bike).

    So what do I do with the SuperV?

    1) Fix the headshock and sell it (spend $90 to sell for $500ish).
    2) Keep it and put a real fork on it ($90 for a CaneCreek reducer headset plus about $200 for a fork).
    3) The Full Uber - It's a 1999 model, so it already has the short tabs - $300 for a fork, $50 for a Jekyll swingarm, $300ish for a rear shock.

    I like the idea of the UberV. My bike currently rides like a dream - Avid BB 8" rotor brakes front and rear, XT shifters/brake levers, XTR rear derailer, XT front derailer, Mavic 317 disc wheelset with XT hubs, RaceFace cranks and stem, ...

    But there's one glaring problem. After spending $700 for the Uberification, I'd end up with a 32lbs., 6" travel, single-pivot bike to complement my 38 lbs, 7" travel, single-pivot bike. I'd end up riding the 7" bike most of the time (so I could get used to jumping it), and the UberV would sit in the garage even more than it does now.

    I need help making a decision. I think I should sell the SuperV, but I can't stand the thought of letting my precious SuperV go. It's been with me for 8 years. It was my first (and until 3 weeks ago - my only) full suspension bike.

    Please....tell me what to do!!!




  2. #2
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    Put a Prophet swingarm on it, alongside your Uberization, thus enabling you to run it as a 6" single pivot 29er. Guessing you don't have one of those laying about the garage Problem is, it'd most likely make your little wheeled bike get dusty.......
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    Put a Prophet swingarm on it, alongside your Uberization, thus enabling you to run it as a 6" single pivot 29er.
    Sure - you could call it the 'Uber Noodle'.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    Sure - you could call it the 'Uber Noodle'.
    Nice, any special sauces come with that frame?
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  5. #5
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    Why would it be a "noodle"? Are you saying that the 29" wheels on the modified frame would not be stable?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by snojcb
    Why would it be a "noodle"? Are you saying that the 29" wheels on the modified frame would not be stable?
    You can get nice stiff 29" wheels. The noodle is the Prophet swingarm. It's nowhere near as stiff as a Jekyll/Super V swingarm. It wags like a dog under a larger rider. That's half the reason ajm sold his Prophet and built up an Uber.

  7. #7
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    Ah. Thanks for clarifying!

    J. C.

  8. #8
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    Its a perfect uber candidate. I can't tell you how to spend your money but I can tell you that I love my uber and I still want a burlier FR bike. I want to start riding Keystone next summer, and while the uber is pretty stout, I don't want to subject it to that kind of abuse. I think a lot of it depends on what kind of riding you do.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    You can get nice stiff 29" wheels. The noodle is the Prophet swingarm. It's nowhere near as stiff as a Jekyll/Super V swingarm. It wags like a dog under a larger rider. That's half the reason ajm sold his Prophet and built up an Uber.
    Is this just a larger rider issue? First I've heard of that about the Prophet. The Prophet swingarm may be "nowhere as stiff as a Jekyll/Super V" (in your opinion), on a Prophet, but it (Prophet swingarm) is on a Super V 4000. snojcb's asking about a Super V bike, not a Prophet bike. And frome what I read above, Mendon's advice is to add a Prophet swingarm to his existing Super V. Now I've not tried to modify a standard Super V with a Rush/Prophet swingarm, but I did it to a Super V 4000 DH.

    I rode the bike with the original jekyll/Super V type swingarm and now with the modified Rush/Prophet swingarm. So I know the before and after. The bike is much stiffer with the Rush/Prophet swingarm vs the original Super V/Jekyll triangle swingarm. Which by the way, BOTH original Super V/Jekyll type swingarms CRACKED. This is the very reason I modified the bike to use the Rush/Prophet swingarm at all. Granted, the 4000 has an additional top tube and a beefier pivot point on the mainframe than a standard super V, but the overall effect is that the bike feels stiffer. Solid. That's a fact. And I can tell you by experience, this setup is the stiffest bike I've thown a leg over in over ten years. If you ever in Arizona, let me know. I do have two of them. Your welcome to give it ride. (Although, I'm undecided with how to build the second one now.)

    jeff

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by az1jeff
    Is this just a larger rider issue? First I've heard of that about the Prophet. The Prophet swingarm may be "nowhere as stiff as a Jekyll/Super V" (in your opinion), on a Prophet, but it (Prophet swingarm) is on a Super V 4000. snojcb's asking about a Super V bike, not a Prophet bike. And frome what I read above, Mendon's advice is to add a Prophet swingarm to his existing Super V. Now I've not tried to modify a standard Super V with a Rush/Prophet swingarm, but I did it to a Super V 4000 DH.
    Okay, but there's alot of riders out there who have issues with Prophet swing arm stiffness. Hence the popularity of the 12mm axle versions as a post purchase upgrade. Widely discussed/griped about. If your mileage varied, good deal, glad it's working for you! I cannot however, see any way that the stifness would be enhanced by which front tri it gets bolted to. My personal experience with the Prophet echoes thier's, in rocky, rooty decents, it would have a fair amount of rear end wag. It's not like the bike came unhinged from reality, but it was way more noticeable, than on my just previous generation Jekyll, same wheels too BTW.

    Since you've done this, and I have you here, I'm looking at 29ering my Uber, and was just playing with frame bits a few nights ago. Do you have A: the exact amount of material required for removal from the pivot's non drive side edge, and B: which bearings you used to allow PSA bearings to fit a SVSA pivot bolt. I know, I could dig, but I'm feeling lazy, thanks!
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  11. #11
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    Again, it (your Prophet issues) must be a "heavy-weight" thing.

    I did this modification to a Super V 4000. Different pivot point and top tube vs. the standard super V. So yes, the stiffness is improved contrary to what you may believe. Again, the 4000 has a centered and solid pivot point down there where the swingarm mounts up to the mainframe.

    BOTH my original jekyll/super V swingarms cracked. That's the reason for doing this modification. Rather than trash two perfectly good mainframes, I now have two very light, very stiff, and unique rides. Works great out in the desert. But that's just me.

    Don't know, as your standard super v has a different pivot point than mine. No machine work to remove or add material is required to mount up the Prophet/Rush swingarm to the Super V 4000. Not sure about the standard Super V as I've not done this.

    jeff

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by az1jeff
    BOTH my original jekyll/super V swingarms cracked. That's the reason for doing this modification.
    Didn't these frames come with the old SV DH swingarms?? The DH swingarms are not the same as the Jekyll swingarms.

  13. #13
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    Same design, just beefier tubing.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by az1jeff
    Same design, just beefier tubing.
    They may be similar to the old SV swingarms but they're nothing like the modern jekyll swingarms that we're referring to.

  15. #15
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    Sure they are. Just thicker tubing, and they still cracked. My point is they are the same triangle type design vs. the Rush/Prophet "arm" design. That's why I said Jekyll/super V "type."

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't the Jekyll swingarm cease to exist by 2005 when the Rush/Prophet's were released? Doesn't that make that Rush/Prophet's swingarm "more modern?" For now, the Rush/Prophet is still in production. But, who knows how long that will last, right. --jeff

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by az1jeff
    Sure they are. Just thicker tubing, and they still cracked. My point is they are the same triangle type design vs. the Rush/Prophet "arm" design. That's why I said Jekyll/super V "type."

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't the Jekyll swingarm cease to exist by 2005 when the Rush/Prophet's were released? Doesn't that make that Rush/Prophet's swingarm "more modern?" For now, the Rush/Prophet is still in production. But, who knows how long that will last, right. --jeff
    Of course the more modern design MUST be better.
    Cannondale only makes things beter and better every year!

  17. #17
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    Better? Beats me.

    This Rush/Prophet swingarm may yield the same results as the original(s). What do I know. Only time will tell. I do know that it's light, stiff, and ain't cracked. Which is more than I can say for how it was just laying around my house. Now I can ride it.

    If there's issues with this modification, I'll post 'em.

    jeff

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