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  1. #1
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    Technical drawings for a lefty

    Does anyone have a proper workshop manual for a lefty in electronic format e.g. PDF?

    I have the PDFs that are available from the Cannondale website, but they don't give you a complete diagram of the lefty's internals. I want to know how it all comes apart and goes back together, so I could do jobs such as change the rubber boot myself when required.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idlefrog
    Does anyone have a proper workshop manual for a lefty in electronic format e.g. PDF?

    I have the PDFs that are available from the Cannondale website, but they don't give you a complete diagram of the lefty's internals. I want to know how it all comes apart and goes back together, so I could do jobs such as change the rubber boot myself when required.

    Thanks


    Sorry, they do not make those available to the public, as they do not want Joe Blow to get up to his eyeballs, thinking he can do it with some pictures, then hurt himself, and sue them. If you are feeling energetic, fly by the seat of your pants, assuming your mechanical skills are high, and you are a considered, careful mechanic. That said though, boot change is easy, with an alloy version, pull it out of the frame mounts (just unbolt and slide down and out). Then slide a new, lightly greased on the inside boot, over and into place. With a Carbon, someone had a neat trick, wrap the lower axle in a bunch of duct tape to cover any sharp edges well, grease it, and slide over, and into place! You could do that with an alloy too, if you were so inclined= Best thing to do is, if you have a shop that you are friendly with, and they trust your abilities, bribe the headshock mechanic with a yummy sixer, and have them run through it after hours sometime! Cheers
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  3. #3
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    I think that sucks. For me my bike is my hobby, not just riding it, but maintaining it too. I like to tinker with it. It should be up to me whether I want to risk servicing it myself or not. I am sure people such as yourself who have had the correct training and experience would do a better job and do it quicker, but that's not the point.

    It could well be that once I saw what was involved inside the lefty I would decide to leave it to a professional to maintain, but I would like to be able to make an informed decision.

    I am thinking of installing a TPC damper myself, but luckily the documents I have seem to cover removing the damper. Any tips to make it go smoothly?

    Thanks

    Andrew

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idlefrog
    I think that sucks. For me my bike is my hobby, not just riding it, but maintaining it too. I like to tinker with it. It should be up to me whether I want to risk servicing it myself or not. I am sure people such as yourself who have had the correct training and experience would do a better job and do it quicker, but that's not the point.

    It could well be that once I saw what was involved inside the lefty I would decide to leave it to a professional to maintain, but I would like to be able to make an informed decision.

    I am thinking of installing a TPC damper myself, but luckily the documents I have seem to cover removing the damper. Any tips to make it go smoothly?

    Thanks

    Andrew
    It's the industry standard: it's all about not getting sued. You might have the judgment to decide what you can do and what you can't but there are always idiots who do stupid things and blame others.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  5. #5
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    I agree! I would love to have a proper Lefty technical document even just for the sake of seeing how it all works and what is inside.

    Mendon, out of curiosity, does Cannondale provide professional bike mechanics with these documents to service their products? When I worked in a car yard, the various manufacturers provided workshop manuals that were not available to the public.

    Due to the liability situation in the US, is it possible for you guys to buy aftermarket workshop manuals which help you work on your cars?

    It never ceases to amaze me that there are people who absolutely detest having another person telling them what to do and intruding on their personal space or freedom, yet these are the same people who take no personal responsibility and sue others for not holding their hands!
    Last edited by Jet-Mech; 04-04-2006 at 08:42 PM.

  6. #6
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idlefrog
    I think that sucks.
    Now let's not get our knickers in a twist= I did not say, you cannot work on it, you will just need to be a bit more creative. As Dan said, there are WAY too many dumb a$$ folks out there with lawyers on retainer, waiting till they hurt themselves, just so they can clean up. Fox does the same thing, most stuff, other than a basic pull apart and lube, are supposed to be done by the factory. This did not stop a pal of mine from accepting responsibility for his actions, and carefully, meticulously, take it all apart, and take care of the problem that was going on. If you are a thoughtful mechanic, and have the ability to think through situations BEFORE having something blow up on you, dive in. As I said, a six pack will open many a mechanics mouth too, so don't be afraid to ask questions. Any shop that steadfastly refuses to allow you to do your own work, is missing the point. They can sell you tools, parts, and deal with real, interesting, problems, and leave the basic lube, clean and service stuff to you. As for TPC upgrading, yeah it's easy. Put the fork upside down, unscrew the bottom damper, and slowly remove, note, there is a bunch of oil in there, it will be a mess, so slowly is the word of the day! Put a bit more 2.5 or 5 wt oil in, like a tablespoon or two, don't fill it up. Insert your TPC compression assembly, again, slowly, mopping up the overflow as you go. start to screw it in, undo the little bleed screw in the bottom of it, tighten up, mopping as you go, reinstall the bleed screw and ride.

    Jet Mech, yes there are manuals, but most shops are taught by the rep, or go to the factory for instruction. The thing with these systems is, they are all the same in principal, and once you understand the basic premise, it's just a matter of different bolts, or a new cartridge style, etc. The same mechanical principals apply whether you are bleeding a Max, or a headshock Fatty cartridge. For some reason, you can buy manuals to work on your car, but I'm no car guy, so I don't know if they are "dumbed down" for the consumer or not.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  7. #7
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    Hey Mendon, good to hear from you.

    The situation with car manuals in my experience is especially precarious. The proper workshop manuals are written by the manufacturers of that particular vehicle, and they are comprehensive documents the size of a phone book.

    The manuals that the public can buy are written by specialist publishing companies and are much less comprehensive. The information contained in them is gained by tearing down a complete vehicle. Thus important stuff such as assembly torque values of fasteners are often the torque value required to remove the fastener during the teardown .

    Something like this must be a product liability lawyer’s dream in some countries!

    Idlefrog, I do not know if you have looked at the specific Lefty site yet;

    www.golefty.com

    but there are several technical notes and manuals on the site. Try this link for the cut-away picture of the Lefty;

    http://www.cannondale.com/Asset/iu_files/116050.pdf

    The information is not too comprehensive, but if you read each technical note / manual carefully, and get a blown up version of the cutaway drawing, I am sure you can find out what you want.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Jet-Mech; 04-05-2006 at 07:16 AM.

  8. #8
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet-Mech
    Hey Mendon, good to hear from you.

    The situation with car manuals in my experience is especially precarious. The proper workshop manuals are written by the manufacturers of that particular vehicle, and they are comprehensive documents the size of a phone book.

    The manuals that the public can buy are written by specialist publishing companies and are much less comprehensive. The information contained in them is gained by tearing down a complete vehicle. Thus important stuff such as assembly torque values of fasteners are often the torque value required to remove the fastener during the teardown .

    Something like this must be a product liability lawyer’s dream in some countries!

    Well, unfortunately for the OP, nothing of that flavor even, exists, yet. I have said I should write one, and if I get a free few months, maybe I will. I'd definately check with Cannondale first though, last thing I need is THEIR lawyers, coming after me= Hopefully he'll bribe some greasy shop guy, and get what he needs. Hands on is always better than a manual anyway.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  9. #9
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    Now this may be a bit more helpful

    When I went to look at a link posted earlier, I thought to look a bit and found this lovely view of the damper assemblies:

    http://www.cannondale.com/Asset/iu_f..._Kit_QC685.pdf

    I think it may be for the 130 Max, but still good info.
    Fatbikes are much more fun than they should be allowed to be!

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  10. #10
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    Mendon, I think the idea of you writing a lefty manual is fantastic! You would be the perfect person with your experience. Perhaps it could include parts such as;

    Maintenance Manual (MM) - how to do the job,
    Illustrated Parts Catalogue (IPC) - how the parts fit together and the
    various part numbers,
    Structural Repair Manual (SRM) - How to straighten a Lefty when
    bent, and
    Troubleshooting Manual (TSM) - Combining a symptom / diagnosis
    list along with a section on tuning
    and adjustment.

    I agree with your notion that hands on experience is best. I always ignored the torque values in those car manuals anyway. I just got a long extension handle and did everything up FT (F***** Tight)!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jet-Mech
    Mendon, I think the idea of you writing a lefty manual is fantastic! You would be the perfect person with your experience. Perhaps it could include parts such as;

    Maintenance Manual (MM) - how to do the job,
    Illustrated Parts Catalogue (IPC) - how the parts fit together and the
    various part numbers,
    Structural Repair Manual (SRM) - How to straighten a Lefty when
    bent, and
    Troubleshooting Manual (TSM) - Combining a symptom / diagnosis
    list along with a section on tuning
    and adjustment.

    I agree with your notion that hands on experience is best. I always ignored the torque values in those car manuals anyway. I just got a long extension handle and did everything up FT (F***** Tight)!


    I'll work on it, and you'll get credit for the cover art =
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

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