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Thread: Taurine help

  1. #1
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    Taurine help

    significant interest in the taurine but don't see much on them here. Anyone got one. If I don't get a road bike I might just get this bike (the one with the headshock) and do the badboy conversion so to speak. One bike for road and dirt. Some ideas on how smooth the frame is and stiffness please. It would be great to have a bike that I can use both on and off road without giving up anything over a strict road bike.

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    Tough to come by

    First, the Taurine is a tough model to come by unless you live in Europe, which outsells the U.S. 10:1 for the Taurine. Basically, every one that comes off the line goes straight to Europe. That could be different now that the racing season is winding down, but that's what I was told in May.

    Second, there is no mountain bike that will perform like a road bike. If you're half-way serious about logging some road miles, a "strict" road bike, as you say, is the only way to go.

    Good luck to you.

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    Great bike, but no roadie

    I also wonderdered why there was so little info on the Taurine on this forum, must be from the sales in Europe. I'm afraid of added to causing that as I recently purchased a Taurine SL3.

    Its a great bike with a very nice and compliant frame. Very smooth over the rough but still direct in steering and power transfer. Absolutely the best hardtail I've ever had. I even prefer it over a scalpel, lighter and for my needs just as comfortable. Me and my GF also have a carbon Rush and a Prophet SL, and we are amazed on how much quicker the Taurine is compared to those bikes.

    Alas, as said in the other post, this is a true MTB and will not be able to replace a real roadbike. I also have a Cannondale 6-13 roadie, thats in another league when it comes to power transfer. You have to bear in mind that road bikes also have ha different geometry.

    Maybe you would be better served with a Cyclocross bike, which is kinda a mix between an roady and a MTB, but is neiter really.

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    LBS has one in the team paint great looker and made me miss the dirt rides I used to do. Florida absolutely sucks for off road fun. In Tampa we have crap so you gotta drive for 1-3 hours just to ride something decent. With work and family this works out to only 1 or 2 outings a month. I gave up and just went to road riding. For one or two rides a month The Taurine would work great as hardtails in my book are the only way to go. My thoughts are 2-3 hours on a bike at whatever average heartrate Is the same workout no matter what I ride. I am a solo rider who loves the alone time. Couple other things like no need to feel like a fred with unshaved legs. Also I don't wear a camelback on my road bike but know damn well that it is the only sensible way to get enough water to battle the Florida heat. It's ok to wear one on a mountain bike. Cool to wear baggies as well. Can ride on sidewalks. Sometimes I just don't trust some areas I ride. These thoughts keep ciccling in my head which is why the post. Also found inspiration on some of your pix with bikes built up for road like I am thinking bout. Sure I'll get the roadie though. It'll be the final goodbye to my 25 years of dirt riding (BMX since 6 years old). then mountain. Spent my whole life making due with riding a dirt machine on the roads till two years ago. Oh well

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    Quote Originally Posted by rounder
    LBS has one in the team paint great looker and made me miss the dirt rides I used to do. Florida absolutely sucks for off road fun. In Tampa we have crap so you gotta drive for 1-3 hours just to ride something decent. With work and family this works out to only 1 or 2 outings a month. I gave up and just went to road riding. For one or two rides a month The Taurine would work great as hardtails in my book are the only way to go. My thoughts are 2-3 hours on a bike at whatever average heartrate Is the same workout no matter what I ride. I am a solo rider who loves the alone time. Couple other things like no need to feel like a fred with unshaved legs. Also I don't wear a camelback on my road bike but know damn well that it is the only sensible way to get enough water to battle the Florida heat. It's ok to wear one on a mountain bike. Cool to wear baggies as well. Can ride on sidewalks. Sometimes I just don't trust some areas I ride. These thoughts keep ciccling in my head which is why the post. Also found inspiration on some of your pix with bikes built up for road like I am thinking bout. Sure I'll get the roadie though. It'll be the final goodbye to my 25 years of dirt riding (BMX since 6 years old). then mountain. Spent my whole life making due with riding a dirt machine on the roads till two years ago. Oh well

    There is nothing wrong with riding fat tires on the road. There's nothing wrong with cyclocross either. The problem lies with putting the skinny tires on the mtn bike. Anybody who really rides, will quickly find out that they will run out of gears really fast on the flats. With a Taurine, you can probably change the spider on the crankset and thow on some road rings (with cdale SI alum cranks you can do this). But then switching them out along with the wheels to go for your mtb rides might become pain. If you do ride with others on the road then I must say no on the Taurine, but you say you ride alone, so do what you like. To wrap this up, my advice is to get a nice bike for the use you will use most and get a beater for the other use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rumshcawheely
    There is nothing wrong with riding fat tires on the road. There's nothing wrong with cyclocross either. The problem lies with putting the skinny tires on the mtn bike. Anybody who really rides, will quickly find out that they will run out of gears really fast on the flats. With a Taurine, you can probably change the spider on the crankset and thow on some road rings (with cdale SI alum cranks you can do this). But then switching them out along with the wheels to go for your mtb rides might become pain. If you do ride with others on the road then I must say no on the Taurine, but you say you ride alone, so do what you like. To wrap this up, my advice is to get a nice bike for the use you will use most and get a beater for the other use.
    A 44-11 is good up to around 35-37 mph I think. No downhills of any measure to worry about spinning out on and I usually don't go over 28-29 mph at any point in my rides.I don't feel cyclecross will handle my off road needs Ridddick and the few other places I would like to ride again are not suited for cyclecross at all. funny I just remembered that i was out last sunday and a group of about 7 riders came upon me and passed. It was a trek train all madones (one new one) and then up the rear a mountainbike on skinny tires. I'm gonna ride the Taurine. Cool thing is that this bike plus extra wheelset will cost about a grand or two less than I was planning to spend on my new bike. The one thing I tend to see myself concerned about is the lack of hand positions on the mountain bike but I don't think it ever bothered me before. Listen to me I'm selling myself a new hardtail.

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    44-11 will not get you to 35 mph (unless you can spin 250 rpm). But do whatever you man! Sounds like you made up your mind, now go drop the cash and have some fun.

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    I have a Taurine

    and it is the best bike I have owned. I consider it a "game changer" as it is 19.85lbs complete with everything but it is a VERY compliant ride. No reason to have a short travel dualie xc bike anymore. The fork is in a league of it own - I never would have believed that a stiff fork and frame can create such an improvement in handling.
    The one thing I will change in 2008 - C'dale is coming out with a new Si crankset with only two rings. Perfect. Will be selling my Turner Nitrous. Also a great bike - but not the stiff but complaint frame of the taurine. The Taurine carbon erases all of the trail buzz.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rumshcawheely
    44-11 will not get you to 35 mph (unless you can spin 250 rpm). But do whatever you man! Sounds like you made up your mind, now go drop the cash and have some fun.
    44x11 gets you 35mph w/o too much trouble. Most folks don't have that much trouble with 113rpm. Here are the calculations:
    Wheels: 26 inch
    Ring: 44
    Cog: 11
    Speed MPH: 35
    Gear Inches: 104
    Gear Ratio: 4 :1
    113 RPM's @ 35 MPH

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbyker
    44x11 gets you 35mph w/o too much trouble. Most folks don't have that much trouble with 113rpm. Here are the calculations:
    Wheels: 26 inch
    Ring: 44
    Cog: 11
    Speed MPH: 35
    Gear Inches: 104
    Gear Ratio: 4 :1
    113 RPM's @ 35 MPH
    thanks for the math. I knew i could get up there no problem as I used to sprint up to 35-37mph while training on the 00 s-works fsr I had. Absolutely hated that bike by the way.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rounder
    thanks for the math. I knew i could get up there no problem as I used to sprint up to 35-37mph while training on the 00 s-works fsr I had. Absolutely hated that bike by the way.
    I was just trying to point out that it is not likely that anyone can sustain a road bike pace with that gearing. If you are riding by yourself all the time, put whatever gear you want on the thing. Realistically there is a reason road bikes do not have mtb gearing. If you are going to ride this bike with anyone that rides a bike with typical road bike gearing (standard or compact), you will be spun out and off the back on the flats (if you ride with people who are somewhat serious about their riding anyway). The better shape you are in the more the gearing will hold you back from going fast. I really was just trying to get you to think of all this before you put all the money into this project. If you ran all this though your head and it still seems like the thing to do, go for it. I felt it was my duty as a fellow cyclist to bring up these points. Whatever you choose, I hope you enjoy your ride.

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