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Thread: Sag setting!

  1. #1
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    Sag setting!

    I just purchased a new Cannondale Jekyll 800, and I'm new to this mountain biking thing. What is really confusing me is this sag thing, and how to set up the rear shock for my size. I weigh about 230 pounds, and I cannot understand the Cannondale manual or the Fox manual about to set up the sag setting. Is there an easy way to do this? The dealer just asked how much I weighed and put 230 pounds of pressure in the shock. Is that correct, or is there a better way. Also, many reviews seem to say the Manitou shock with SPV(?) is better than the Fox Float shock. I noticed that the Manitou comes on the Jekyll's that are the 1000 series and higher, but not on my 800. Are they better, and if so, can they be fitted onto the 800, or is the geometry different? Thanks very much for the help. I guess with this mountain biking thing you have to learn a little at a time from people who really know what they are talking about, so thanks in advance for the assistance. It is very much appreciated.

    Carl

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    jcw
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    Very good questions Carl. Sag is one of those things that will vary with rider preference. Some like a bit more sag (plusher feel) some like a bit less sag (firmer feel). Generally you want to be in the range of from about 20% to 35% of your shock stroke. If you like a plusher ride you'd be toward the upper end of sag, which would mean less pressure in the shock. And conversely for a firmer ride you'd opt for less sag or more pressure in your shock. With the Jekyll starting out at pressure equal to riders weight is a good starting point, but you should experiment to see what you like best. That's what the little rubber O-ring on the shock shaft is for. In case you don't know how to check your sag, it's best to have a helper, but you can do it yourself. Either put your bike in a trainer or support yourself in a doorway. Sit in the saddle with all your weight but be careful not to bounce the rear suspension. Have your assistant (or carefully reach down and do it yourself) push the o-ring firmly against the bottom of the shock body, and then carefully dismount the bike, trying not to compress the rear suspension. Then measure the distance from the o-ring to the lower edge of the shock body. I think the new Jekylls have 1.75" shock stroke, so 20% sag would be about 9mm from 0-ring to shock body, and 35% sag would be about 15mm. Your sag should be somewhere between those 2.

    As for SPV vs. Fox Pro-pedal, they both have similar technology, but the Manitou's have an adjustable platform, while the fox is set at the factory and is not adjustable. They both help eliminate bob from suspension. I would not recommend an upgrade to the SPV as I think you'd notice very little, if any, difference. Down the road you may want to pick up a shock with rebound damping if your 800 doesn't already have it. Having adjustable damping can really help to dial in the ride quality for your weight, riding style and terrain. Hope that helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by cwp3420
    I just purchased a new Cannondale Jekyll 800, and I'm new to this mountain biking thing. What is really confusing me is this sag thing, and how to set up the rear shock for my size. I weigh about 230 pounds, and I cannot understand the Cannondale manual or the Fox manual about to set up the sag setting. Is there an easy way to do this? The dealer just asked how much I weighed and put 230 pounds of pressure in the shock. Is that correct, or is there a better way. Also, many reviews seem to say the Manitou shock with SPV(?) is better than the Fox Float shock. I noticed that the Manitou comes on the Jekyll's that are the 1000 series and higher, but not on my 800. Are they better, and if so, can they be fitted onto the 800, or is the geometry different? Thanks very much for the help. I guess with this mountain biking thing you have to learn a little at a time from people who really know what they are talking about, so thanks in advance for the assistance. It is very much appreciated.

    Carl
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

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    You could add the manitou if you wanted, i would stick with the fox though if it's propedal, your bank account will thank you, otherwise you may want to consider the manitou. The best thing to do is turn the propedal feature to the most lax setting or off, if you have it. then measure your seat height from the floor, sit on the bike and measure it again, you should drop roughly 25% of the travel. then set your other adjustments as you see fit while riding. It would help to know what year jekyll you have.

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    jcw
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm03
    You could add the manitou if you wanted, i would stick with the fox though if it's propedal, your bank account will thank you, otherwise you may want to consider the manitou. The best thing to do is turn the propedal feature to the most lax setting or off, if you have it..
    That'd be great advice, except for the fact that pro-pedal has no settings, it is what it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by jm03
    then measure your seat height from the floor, sit on the bike and measure it again, you should drop roughly 25% of the travel. then set your other adjustments as you see fit while riding. It would help to know what year jekyll you have.
    That sounds like a difficult method to get an accurate reading. Just use the O-ring method - that's what it's there for.
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

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    I thought there was a knob on propedals that adjusted the compression 'nose' as they call it. I know the swingers have a actual air chamber for this, am i wrong about that?

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    jcw
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm03
    I thought there was a knob on propedals that adjusted the compression 'nose' as they call it. I know the swingers have a actual air chamber for this, am i wrong about that?
    The pro-pedals are preset at the factory, the only adjustments are air pressure, rebound damping (if you have the float R) and Lockout (Float RC, or I guess it's called the RL now???).
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

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    thanks , i thought they had a knob to adjust this. Sorry didn't mean to mislead anyone.

  8. #8
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    As an owner of both a Pro pedal RL and a Swinger, I've put my wife's RL on my bike for comparison. I found the propedal to be the same pedal platform as my favorite SPV setting, but I get noticeably (but not greatly) better cornering traction on gravel roads with my Swinger at speeds over 20 mph.

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    Sag Question

    Quote Originally Posted by jcw
    Very good questions Carl. Sag is one of those things that will vary with rider preference. Some like a bit more sag (plusher feel) some like a bit less sag (firmer feel). Generally you want to be in the range of from about 20% to 35% of your shock stroke. If you like a plusher ride you'd be toward the upper end of sag, which would mean less pressure in the shock. And conversely for a firmer ride you'd opt for less sag or more pressure in your shock. With the Jekyll starting out at pressure equal to riders weight is a good starting point, but you should experiment to see what you like best. That's what the little rubber O-ring on the shock shaft is for. In case you don't know how to check your sag, it's best to have a helper, but you can do it yourself. Either put your bike in a trainer or support yourself in a doorway. Sit in the saddle with all your weight but be careful not to bounce the rear suspension. Have your assistant (or carefully reach down and do it yourself) push the o-ring firmly against the bottom of the shock body, and then carefully dismount the bike, trying not to compress the rear suspension. Then measure the distance from the o-ring to the lower edge of the shock body. I think the new Jekylls have 1.75" shock stroke, so 20% sag would be about 9mm from 0-ring to shock body, and 35% sag would be about 15mm. Your sag should be somewhere between those 2.

    As for SPV vs. Fox Pro-pedal, they both have similar technology, but the Manitou's have an adjustable platform, while the fox is set at the factory and is not adjustable. They both help eliminate bob from suspension. I would not recommend an upgrade to the SPV as I think you'd notice very little, if any, difference. Down the road you may want to pick up a shock with rebound damping if your 800 doesn't already have it. Having adjustable damping can really help to dial in the ride quality for your weight, riding style and terrain. Hope that helps.
    JCW,

    Thanks for the response and the answers. They really helped me a lot. I'm sorry I haven't responded sooner, as I work with the Secret Service and I've been flying all over with John Kerry for the last few weeks. I have one other quick question. When you say to measure the o-ring to the lower edge of the shock body, do you mean to the top of the shock closest to the front of the bike, or to the shock end by the rear tire? I have let some air out and it has helped quite a bit. Thanks for the assistance! It's nice to know there are people out there willing to share their knowledge. I hope to someday be able to do the same. Thanks again, JCW!

  10. #10
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    Push the o-ring up against the shock body, get on the bike gently and sit in a normal riding position without bouncing, then get off and measure how much the o-ring moved. You are measuring from the shock body back to the o-ring.
    I have a question for you. Does John Kerry talk like mayor Quimby on the Simpsons all the time?

  11. #11
    jcw
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwp3420
    JCW,

    Thanks for the response and the answers. They really helped me a lot. I'm sorry I haven't responded sooner, as I work with the Secret Service and I've been flying all over with John Kerry for the last few weeks. I have one other quick question. When you say to measure the o-ring to the lower edge of the shock body, do you mean to the top of the shock closest to the front of the bike, or to the shock end by the rear tire? I have let some air out and it has helped quite a bit. Thanks for the assistance! It's nice to know there are people out there willing to share their knowledge. I hope to someday be able to do the same. Thanks again, JCW!
    You're very welcome. Sorry about the confusion, I forgot what bike we were talking about and was assuming a vertically mounted shock, as my current one is, and yours is obviously mounted horizontally. For the Jekyll, that would be the end closest to the rear tire.
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

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