Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4

    Rush Or Rush Carbon ?

    I am getting a new rush and have a choice between a rush alu or rush carbon.
    I am a little concerned about a carbon fiber mountain bike and wonder how it will hold up in the long run.
    Anybody has any experience with that?
    Thanks for the input.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,829
    Cdale has a lifetime frame warranty. I'm assuming that goes for the carbons as well.

    There is one thing about carbon bikes. You can't easily fix a cosmetic blemish. With Al and paint, you can just touch it up and go. With carbon layers and such, it's harder. I tried to fix a carbon part for someone once. It involved an epoxy fill (0.5 mm deep), sanding course, to med, to fine. Then, 2 polishing levels and it still didn't look like new.

    If I had the choice, I would go with the carbon. I'm not as concerned with how my bike looks vs how it rides. I would ride a pink bike with bright green rims if it was only 15 lbs, had 140 mm of travel at both ends and could stand up to my riding.......
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  3. #3
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,361
    And we all trust Carbon Lefties, why not the frames?

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  4. #4
    Witty Title.
    Reputation: nordeaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    44
    One thing that would sway me is that the Aluminum frame is made in Bedford, Pennsylvania, where the carbon from is made in Anonymous, Taiwan.

    I personally will not buy any future carbon frames from Cannondale unless they're made in the U.S. It's not a quality thing. Taiwan makes fine bicycles.
    --

    ~bc

    member, nemba.org

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    304
    a person from taiwan that have made 1000 frames against a american that had made 10 frams, why, should the person from usa, be a better framebuilder? it´s just a example, but hope you understand

  6. #6
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,361
    Quote Originally Posted by Baltazar
    a person from taiwan that have made 1000 frames against a american that had made 10 frams, why, should the person from usa, be a better framebuilder? it´s just a example, but hope you understand
    I think nordeaster understands that (he said it's not a quality thing, even admit Taiwan make great bikes). I think he means it as supporting the US economy. Doesn't mean much to non-americans though but the stiffer ride and lighter weight of the carbon Rush do! For those who care about the US made thing though, the new Scalpel Carbon is made in the US.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Black RONIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,506
    Quote Originally Posted by filipi
    I am getting a new rush and have a choice between a rush alu or rush carbon.
    I am a little concerned about a carbon fiber mountain bike and wonder how it will hold up in the long run.
    Anybody has any experience with that?
    Thanks for the input.
    Well, I really can't tell you much about the carbon, but the alu Rush can really take some abuse, trust me. But today a friend of mine just got his Carbon Rush, and man, that was the MOST beautiful bike I EVER laid my eyes on. Not only that, the frame seems even STRONGER than the aluminum version, and that must count for something. Not to mention how light the frame itself is.

    I'm slowly changing my mind. My always by-my-door Prophet never seems to get in, and again I was informed that NO Prophets will be imported until the 2008 bikes hit the streets, so yes, I will continue being a Prophet orfan. But that is getting old on me. The Rush seems to be a reliable and nimble bike, and I'm comsidering getting one, the Carbon one, but haven't made my mind on what model, the Rush 1 or the 2. But if I get a Rush, that will be the Carbon, you bet.

  8. #8
    Bikes!
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,635
    I'm currently talking with my LBS about the possibility of buying a carbon Rush from them. I'm a big guy at about 240lbs and they reassured me that this would not be a problem so I'm sold on one for my next FS...
    2014 Yeti SB95c
    2014 Trek Stache 8
    2014 Intense Tracer 275
    2013 Trek CrossRip Elite
    2000 Intense Tracer

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    29
    I can't attest to how much abuse the Rush Carbon can take, because I have yet to punish it. I have done severall 3-4 foot drops on it and I haven't even bottomed the suspension yet. What I can say, after riding an Al Prophet for over a year, is that the carbon frame of the Rush feels as stiff or stiffer than the Al Prophet. Just looking at the frame inspires confidence that it wont fail. The lines are very smooth and the downtube is massive.

    And just like the other guy said, you get a lifetime frame warranty as long as you buy from an authorized dealer. IMO the Rush Carbon is a top quality frame, the only probelm I had was forking over the dough. Good luck.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    116
    just been having the same dilema myself.
    does the carbon rush definatley have a lifetime warrenty?

  11. #11
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,361
    Quote Originally Posted by bloater27
    does the carbon rush definatley have a lifetime warrenty?
    Yes it has.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  12. #12
    Witty Title.
    Reputation: nordeaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    44
    Well, my intentions are manifold. Yes, one, certainly, is supporting the US economy. It's important to me that Americans keep their framebuilding jobs, as it helps all other Americans. Secondly, buying local is always better: if you ship me something from Pennsylvania, it starts out a lot closer to me, and thus less polution is generated by its transport. Thirdly, there's something to be said for designers and builders and testers being close: it leads to better quality, since they can be much more interactive, and react quicker to problems and adjustments.

    Again, nothing against Taiwan. Same would hold true in reverse if i were Taiwanese, buying a Tainwanese bike, it would make less sense to me for it to be designed in-country, have the frame built and shipped in from the other side of the globe, then assembled and sold in-country. It's just a waste of resources to save some short-term money. And the savings will catchup to us in the long run in the form of economic weakness and environmental impact.

    The original poster's profile said he was from California, so I thought I'd pass on my American viewpoint. I realize others on this forum are from around the globe and am not making a case that you too should buy for these reasons. Italians buying Italian bikes might feel the same way.
    --

    ~bc

    member, nemba.org

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •