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  1. #1
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    Rize 5 vs Rize 4 vs Prophet 2

    Hey guys, I'm looking for a new bike and need some advise on which route to go. I had a Super V2000 back in the day and recently picked up a Jekyll 800. The Jekyll is too big so now I need something else. I was wondering if there is a big difference between the Rize 5 and Rize 4 and a Prophet 2? I'm not a hard core biker and would probably only ride 1-2 times a month on average 3-4 if I'm lucky. I'll be riding with a lot of friends who are beginners and would mainly stay on paved roads, but I want something that I can take off roads on some easy/medium trails when I go out by myself or with the wife. Which do you think would best suit me?

    I found a used Rize 5 (small) for under a grand (it was a rental bike that they're getting ride of) A rize 4 would be brand new and twice the cost of the Rize 5 (medium). And then there is a sweet Prophet 2 (medium)thats only a year old which is in the middle of the two Rizes. Which would you think suit me the best? I'm about 5'10 with an inseam of 29". I've ridden a Medium Rize 4 which I thought felt fine, but I didn't try the small. The bike shop said I'm in between and I can get away with either one.

  2. #2
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    I would def recommend getting the rize 5 for under 1000. its the best deal, the rize four for that price is overkill imo for what your lookin to do.

    i got a 09 rize 5 for $1800 new. I like it alot because i do alot of long bumpy downhill. it has a lot of travel, and you can go really fast downhill because of the travel. I wouldnt say it stuggles uphill, but it is def better going down.

    I ride all the time and sometimes i cant make it to the mountain so i ride on paved courses around where i live. on the rize 5 you can lock out the front shock, and minimize the rear shock alot. if you get the rize you will be doing this alot, since youll be riding on paved roads..

    like i said the rize is best for going downhill and using all the travel. i wish i could of gotten mine for under a G.

    Maybe test ride a 29er
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  3. #3
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    get the right size first. I was inbetween a L and M on my Prophet and went with the M. It worked ok, but always felt cramped in the cockpit. I would streer you too the bigger size. That way you have more flexiblilty on the setup. I had to have a setback seatpost on my prophet with a long saddle and 120 mm stem. I would have like a shorter stem, but needed the reach.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the input. The Rize 5 is the most tempting due to the price, but I'm worried about the size. I haven't ridden a small. However, I also like the fact that the Rize 4 and Prophet 2 would be more then I ever need. The bike won't be the limiting factor if I ever get good enought to use the bike to the max. I'm sure the Rize 5 is plenty for me and way better then the Super V or Jekyll I'm coming from.

    I did try out a 29er. I think it was a Gary Fisher (size small) and it was interesting to say the least. I felt so tall on the bike like I was in an SUV. it was fast and cleared a lot of ground with little effort, but there is something to be said about full suspension bikes. They're just so much more comfortable.
    Last edited by djkev; 10-21-2009 at 12:51 PM.

  5. #5
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    If you only going to ride a little bit i would go with the cheaper bike. no point in wasting money on extra bling if you really dont need it. i try to ride about 10 times a week so i tend to get the better gear but you should be totaly fine with the rize 5

  6. #6
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    I was in the same situation than you. Coming from a Super V, I was concerned about stand over height.(I'm 5'6" with an inseam of 291/2") Tried several different bikes, from small Rush to medium Gary Fisher HiFi. I say try the size small, you'll be surprised. I finally got a size small Rize 4, and although it was part of a rental fleet, she wasn't ridden too hard( an advantage of the size small, I guess). She was the cheapest choice, but the sweet parts and the lighter weight makes it a joy to ride. If you can, get a Rize!

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the reply. I think I was reading that you tried a Rush before you ended up with the Rize. I'm kinda strapped for cash and have a really tight budget. I'm starting to think that I should get a decent new mid-level FS bike like a Rush 6 or Rize 5. How do the Rize and the Rush compare to the Super V?

  8. #8
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    In my experience, the Super V was a lot of fun (I owned several) but the headshok was lacking. Specially since I moved to Utah and the mountains are really big. My last Super V valiantly soldiered on for a while, but had to make some serious updates, like getting a better rear air shock, lighter wheels, longer, oversized stem and bars, etc. But no matter what, the Headshok had to go. If you don't ride big mountains, 80mm should serve you fine, but I had to update. Sold my bike,went to several shops, read magazines, test rode everything under the sun, and I had a tight budget. when it came down to it, I wanted another Cannondale, so it was either the Rush or a Rize. A side to side comparison will reveal that the Rush was a little better climber than the Rize, and the Rize climbs much better than the Super V. The Rush sits lower to the ground,with a more "tractable" feel over the terrain. You can feel everything you ride over! But it can be very rough. The Rize, on the other hand, is smooth! it just rolls and does not transmit every imperfection of the trail to your body. That was important to me, as I have a bad back. I don't want to feel every pebble in my way. Some people prefer that, though, so if you can, ride them both in the dirt. One thing I noticed, is that the Rize is way better than the Rush and the Super V going around turns and going downhill. It's deceptively fast, and oh so smooth. Did I mention that it's smooth? Bottom line: If you can find a used Rize, it'll cost about the same than a new Rush, but you'll get a tough, versatile machine that can go up, over, around and down any trail you can think of.

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