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  1. #1
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    Rize 4 eating derailleurs

    I am already on my 3rd broken dérailleur in less then a year on this bike. I think I might have broken one hanger in all that time, the rest of the hangers just got bent. I don't seem the hangers are making the sacrifice. So for, I broke the OE shimano, Sram X9 and today a Sram X4. What the hell am I doing wrong here? Is it just bad luck? I never broke a dérailleur on my POS Iron Horse, and I rode that longer, and paid as much for the Iron Horse, as I spent on dérailleurs

  2. #2
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
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    How do they break? Crash? Bad shifts? Bad adjustments?

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  3. #3
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    Shimano, Took a spill, it broke a little later while peddling up hill. X9 got taken out by a stick. X4 got hit with a piece of blue stone that was flipped up by driving over it, it was not a stationary rock. No problem with shifts or adjustments. I think the X4 was cheap, and I got what I paid for. $30 but it shifted just as good as the X9.

  4. #4
    Uber V Cripp
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    Ride more to satiate the beast. She's just hungry....

  5. #5
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    Sounds like bad luck. Try a shadow rear derailleur (XTR, XT, or SLX).

  6. #6
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    Check to see if the derailleur hanger is bent, just a thought but I had the same problem and that was my problem...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Mascret
    Check to see if the derailleur hanger is bent, just a thought but I had the same problem and that was my problem...
    I put a new one on, with the dérailleur, cause it was bent. I guess it is just bad luck. But I still don't know why the hanger is not doing its job, Breaking!?

  8. #8
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    Sounds like if maybe you're riding with less care on this bike than the previous, as both have 26" wheels and the RDs are pretty much in the same place How different are the hangers between the 2 bikes, is 1 much sturdier than the other to sacrifice the derailleur instead? The hanger on my RIP9 is stury as hell and I don't think you could bend it with a hammer = bad design and the RD always pays. But if you ride careful and watch what you ride near and avoid stuff you won't have issues.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Sounds like if maybe you're riding with less care on this bike than the previous, as both have 26" wheels and the RDs are pretty much in the same place How different are the hangers between the 2 bikes, is 1 much sturdier than the other to sacrifice the derailleur instead? The hanger on my RIP9 is stury as hell and I don't think you could bend it with a hammer = bad design and the RD always pays. But if you ride careful and watch what you ride near and avoid stuff you won't have issues.
    The Iron Horse broke many hangers, I still ride balls to the wall If I wanted a gentle ride I would get a road bike. Maybe I will hit the hanger with a grinder and give it some weakness?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by flman
    The Iron Horse broke many hangers, I still ride balls to the wall If I wanted a gentle ride I would get a road bike. Maybe I will hit the hanger with a grinder and give it some weakness?
    I tend to think I ride fairly aggressively in both training and racing, and have not bent a der, or a hanger in over 2 years. Its all about the rider and the line that you pick through the rough terrain.

  11. #11
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    There's a HUGE difference between riding aggresively and picking good lines as opposed to picking bad lines and bashing parts off the bike. Maybe as suggested, try one of the more inboard Shimano Shadow derailleurs.

    I've broken exactly 1 dearailleur and 1 hanger , 1 on each bike I owned over 5 years riding and both were my fault - 1st I tried to keep riding through that nasty super stick, just barely wet enough mud that clogged the tyres in 5 ft, eventually the chain got caked, locked up and snapped the hanger. 2nd bike I had a wipe out and the bike landed on the drive side, there went a nice XT short cage XT derailleur. I like to think I don't baby my bikes and rides pretty knar terrain

    Quote Originally Posted by flman
    The Iron Horse broke many hangers, I still ride balls to the wall If I wanted a gentle ride I would get a road bike. Maybe I will hit the hanger with a grinder and give it some weakness?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  12. #12
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    I thought replaceable hangers were there to save the frame, not so much the derailleur? Also, a new hanger should at least be checked for alignment with a proper alignment tool. A bent hanger can be realigned with the same tool (but may bend again more easily).

    The only derailleur I've lost was to an elevator door...

    I've seen cages that you can bolt on to cover the derailleur from impact, but I think they are mostly meant for kids who drop their bikes to the ground driveside.

  13. #13
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    Well, the trails I ride are nothing but rugged old blue stone quarry trails. Ask Pedler845 how the Lake Onteora trails are. They a basically shark fin and loose blue stone the rattle as you pass over them, not much in the way of dirt track. But thanks for all the help, I feel better to know that this is some of my fault and the fault of the rough terrain I ride in, I am going to look into a dérailleur guard. And yes, I agree the hanger was meant to protect the frame.

    Looking at the fracture, it is at the arm that attaches to the hanger, the X4 is a real POS, it is made out of what looks like pot metal. Any other dérailleur would not have broken so easy from a flying rock.
    Last edited by flman; 04-14-2010 at 03:21 PM.

  14. #14
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    I hear ou on the terrain, our island is coralstone and my fav trails are loaded with big, sharp rocks just waiting to tear parts or flesh off. I've ridden behind one guy and watched him snap off an X9 RD as easy as breaking a twig in your fingers. Give the Shadow RD a try and see if it doesn't help pull it in out of the way of rocks etc. Me personally could never try one as I absolutely love the rapid rise RDs.

    Quote Originally Posted by flman
    Well, the trails I ride are nothing but rugged old blue stone quarry trails. Ask Pedler845 how the Lake Onteora trails are. They a basically shark fin and loose blue stone the rattle as you pass over them, not much in the way of dirt track. But thanks for all the help, I feel better to know that this is some of my fault and the fault of the rough terrain I ride in, I am going to look into a dérailleur guard. And yes, I agree the hanger was meant to protect the frame.

    Looking at the fracture, it is at the arm that attaches to the hanger, the X4 is a real POS, it is made out of what looks like pot metal. Any other dérailleur would not have broken so easy from a flying rock.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  15. #15
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    Even though you put a new hanger you need to check alignment. A bike shop should have the tool, The one I used was made by Park Tools. My bike shops checks new bikes and noticed about half the new bikes are way out of alignment...

  16. #16
    Tool
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    Also, the hanger is much more apt to sacrifice itself in the lateral versus fore-aft direction. While sticks are a crap shoot relative to this, I'd speculate that a flying rock is more likely to exert itself on the RD in the fore-aft direction.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  17. #17
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    Check to make sure your chain isn't too short. Let the air out of your shock and cycle the suspension. I had a Prophet set up as a 1x9 and I bent a hanger and derailleur before I realized the chain growth from suspension compression was eating the parts. The chain was too short and it yanked the hanger out of alignment and pulled the deraileur into the spokes. I was always watching the DH guys run their derailleur cage all stretched out and thought I could run mine that short too. Then I got smart and actually inspected the bike before I killed more parts. The Prophet has a lot of chain growth being a single pivot I guess. It was only one link short, but that was enough. Of course I was running a Dura Ace too which is way shorter than most MTB derailleurs so that didn't help either. Anyway, just let the air out of your shock (a lot of people say remove it, don't, you want it to cycle only what the shock allows) and go from full compression to full rebound and see if the derailleur is strained or not. Good luck whatever the problem is. Just my 2 cents.

  18. #18
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    Thanks guys I did do the chain length test last time, and added a few links. Any link to the hanger tool?

  19. #19
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    The tool is more than a new hanger. Most places have the hangers for less than $30 or so. Below is a link to Universalcycles.com. Don't know if your particular hanger is in there or not, but check it out.

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...7&category=119

  20. #20
    MTB B'dos
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    A new hanger is the cheapest thing to try first, but if he's knocked the derailleur hard enough it may or may not have done it's job and the frame might be out, so if the new hanger doesn't solve any issues next options is a local shop with the tool and someone who knows how to use it or buy one himself.

    Quote Originally Posted by mbc4386
    The tool is more than a new hanger. Most places have the hangers for less than $30 or so. Below is a link to Universalcycles.com. Don't know if your particular hanger is in there or not, but check it out.

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...7&category=119
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  21. #21
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    Actually, instead of changing hangers, I just put the Allen key in the mounting bolt of the dérailleur and bend the hanger until every thing is back in line

    I keep a few new hangers around any ways, being my wife and I both have Rize's.

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