• 05-10-2012
    TobyGadd
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rmcsharry View Post
    Sarcasm might be the lowest form of wit, but this surely deserves a prize? :thumbsup:

    And the prize is...a well-deserved beating? ;)

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bighec View Post
    My head hurts...:madman:

    Left or right side? No pain, no gain!
  • 05-10-2012
    bee
    What about Amy's experience on page 1? Are you guys saying she is imagining all that? She has a Left fork and hers pulls to the right. She wanted to know why and all you guys do is make fun of her. Not cool.
  • 05-10-2012
    bee
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by amy_marc View Post
    Mine always goes right. Why?


    I am not sure why your bike tracks to the right. Thats why I posed the initial question since I don't have a lefty fork. You know, you aren't the first to have this experience and I have heard others too. I wonder if it is just due to different types of frames with the lefty fork. Maybe it has something to do with some bikes have a lot of front end stiffness so some people can't tell a difference, but others do.
  • 05-10-2012
    TobyGadd
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bee View Post
    What about Amy's experience on page 1? Are you guys saying she is imagining all that? She has a Left fork and hers pulls to the right. She wanted to know why and all you guys do is make fun of her. Not cool.

    I think that most people on the Cannondale forum are a little jaded by questions such as hers, which is what leads to the inevitable silly responses. The truth is that Lefty forks don't pull to the side. Although they look like they might, they don't. But sometimes the cable routing is awkward, which can pull the wheel to one side or the other--which is not a problem that is unique to Leftys. If the wheel turns when the bike is lifted off the ground, it's probably a brake or derailleur cable that is either too long, too short, or somehow pulling or pushing on the bars.
  • 05-10-2012
    XCProphet
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TobyGadd View Post
    I think that most people on the Cannondale forum are a little jaded by questions such as hers, which is what leads to the inevitable silly responses. The truth is that Lefty forks don't pull to the side. Although they look like they might, they don't. But sometimes the cable routing is awkward, which can pull the wheel to one side or the other--which is not a problem that is unique to Leftys. If the wheel turns when the bike is lifted off the ground, it's probably a brake or derailleur cable that is either too long, too short, or somehow pulling or pushing on the bars.

    I get asked by people if my Lefty is balanced,

    my response is "Yes, otherwise you would not be ETERNALLY stuck in your body asking such trivial questions"
  • 05-11-2012
    BoostN7
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dan Gerous View Post
    DING! DING! DING! We have a winner here! :thumbsup:

    Hooray!

    *Boost receives 10 points*
  • 05-11-2012
    jimification
    I reckon that's most likely but one other thing you could check...Is the wheel dished correctly? It's harder to notice if dishing is off on a Lefty.

    For what it's worth, mine definitely doesn't pull to one side or the other.
  • 05-11-2012
    thatdrewguy
    Problem I have with the Lefty is when I forget to use the rear brake and only apply the front. Since the brake caliper is also on the left side the bike just whips a tight left turn that scares the heck out of me.
  • 05-11-2012
    herbn
    hey,i actually have a serious reply!
    how is the dish on your wheel? i have zero experience with leftys, i usually make light of them when i see them, but if your wheel was not centered under the steerer there would definitely be this kind of problem, i'm guessing that they dish centered between the flanges, and a canondale dealer would have a truing stand spaced for this. Wheels usually go out of dish for me away from the brake ,front and back,and i really use alot of front brake and i guess those spokes see alot of stretching and releasing so the ones on the brakeside, particularly the ones that get unloaded when braking, tend to loosen and the wheels dish goes off a bit.
  • 05-12-2012
    scalpel226
    1 Attachment(s)
    it's not that hard.....actually....:D
  • 05-12-2012
    XCProphet
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by scalpel226 View Post
    it's not that hard.....actually....:D

    This guy gets paid to do it
  • 05-13-2012
    MendonCycleSmith
    Made a great discovery the other night.

    Was finishing out a ride, coming back on a dirt road filled with pot holes, many 6+ inches deep, but wide.

    Riding no hands isn't normally an issue. Lefty or not.

    Most of my time is spent on a Fat Lefty at this point, and I was not expecting to have issues with riding no hands, which I didn't. What did surprise me was I could aim for any pot hole I wanted, plow through, and be none the worse for wear. Road no hands, pounding holes for almost a mile. :thumbsup:
  • 05-13-2012
    fokof
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by thatdrewguy View Post
    Problem I have with the Lefty is when I forget to use the rear brake and only apply the front. Since the brake caliper is also on the left side the bike just whips a tight left turn that scares the heck out of me.


    :D


    Trolling at it's best :p
  • 05-30-2012
    Mar&Co
    my bike does pull to the right....
    Actually I just wrote to Cannondale about the pull problem I have. Next thing I started looking for info on the web and found this forum.

    In February I've got myself a new Flash 29er Carbon3 and I love it. I noticed the bike is not well balanced though. If I ride it no-hands I need to lean quite far to the left (bike pulls to the right). I tested another identical bike from my local reseller to discover the very same symptoms.

    I checked the routing of all cables and changed several configurations but nothing changed.

    If I stand above the bike aligning visually frame and front wheel it appears the wheel is moved toward the shok. Now I am thinking about adjusting the spokes so the wheel is moved away from the lefty by 2-4mm but I will wait for answer from C-dale first.

    Mar&Co
  • 05-30-2012
    fokof
    That's what is called "dish"

    The 26 answers in this thread who were suggesting to check the dish just meant that.
  • 05-30-2012
    1niceride
    Just pull a string from the front wheel to the rear wheel. There should be four points of contact at the same time on the wheels.

    Use a straight edge with a good rear wheel, no tire. See if it sights straight with the head tube. Also check against the seat tube. Many bikes have misaligned dropouts or linkages and will cause pulling.

    Out of 8 assorted frames I've owned, all needed some tweaking with a round file at the dropouts to get them straight. I mean really straight.
  • 06-04-2012
    Expatriot
    Mine pulled to the right!

    I resolved the problem by re-aligning the rear tire and making sure it was nice and tight.
  • 06-04-2012
    kw.logo
    When I leave my bike perfectly vertical on a service stand, Lefty always goes to the left, which is natural due to gravity force, and it does the same when I ride. I have to lean the bike to the right to be able to ride with no hands. I think it might be different in other bikes, depending on the head angle. I owe Cannondale Prophet with 69* head angle, and that's pretty "flat" for a bike with asymmetric fork.
  • 06-04-2012
    1niceride
    Does anybody know if the body's COG is the same left to right? Maybe that left pull counters that asymmetrical COG?


    I have found a straight bike/fork pulls straight. If the front wheel's contact is to the left of the rear, It will pull to the right. If the front wheel is to the right of the rear, it will pull left.

    If the rear wheel is toed to the left, it will pull right. If the rear wheel is toed right, it will pull left.

    Out of 9 frames I've owned in 12 years, the Sette Riddik has been pin straight with any fork I've used on it. All other frames pulled one way or the other alittle. Lastly, many forks are sprung on one side only.
  • 09-09-2012
    s570e
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by saturnine View Post
    it is absolutely true. the design engineers never even considered the possibility of that. even with your hands on the bars, the bike veers to one side. dirtbikes do this as well because of their one-sided rear end.

    What?
    You're nuts... I am 100% sure that my Lefty does not make my bike pull to one side. And if it was that easy to offset the centrifical force and inertia of a bike in motion then wouldn't the chain and gearing which drives the wheel create even more such instability???
    Mtb bikes and compnents are expensive and due to location many must rely on these forums to form an opinion before making such an investment. Knowing this I wouldn't try to steer someone toward a rediculouse bias based off of nonsense passed off as "Fact"!

    So NO this is not true!
    I ride my Lefty 20 miles to work and 20 miles back 5 days a week and have never felt this tendency when I let go of the bars. MAybe you have bent seat rails or something?

    My personal take on my Lefty Fork:
    The fork feels like a short travel XC fork.Besides the feel of the needle bearings it feels just like any other.
    It has it's pro's and con's - just like any other. I don't love it and I don't hate it.
    It just serves it's purpose. It's light and stiff, responds well to terrain and has shown zero signs of weakness but it requires some servicing to ensure best function and reliability. (as do many others, e.g. Fox forks)

    I personally I have jumped, climbed, twisted and turned my lefty DLR for 3 years now and it's done fine, but I have also had it serviced by Cannondale every year without fail as my LBS has suggested at a cost of around $200 per service. (Which I do consider to be a high price but in my situation I will save that in gas money in a week!)

    Pros=
    - I find the fork to be very reliable, consistent and trustworthy.
    - It doesn't flex or twist so I know that the fork will always be pushing my wheel back toward the Earth in the interest of solid traction.
    Cons=
    - $200. is expensive for annual service.
    - Must be sent to Cannondale for servicing ( Two weeks is the longest it has taken for my fork to come back)
    -Limits aftermarket Hub and stem selection.

    -Hope this helps.
  • 09-09-2012
    StumpyElite2010
    The Flash 29 with the lefty PBR is definitely more difficult to ride with no hands compare to the my other bike Niner one.
  • 09-11-2012
    spyda00
    my lefty was pulling to one side as the front hub bearings had worn out and there was play. replaced and now its back to normal :thumbsup:
  • 09-11-2012
    leoferus
    I may be late to this party but I can contribute. I am a new Lefty owner and I was concerned with this issue. So, testing the fork for no hands riding was on my priority list. I have the new 2013 Lefty and I report that you can ride no hands until the cows come home. I'll see about getting video if I have the time.

    In addition, it does not pull.
  • 09-29-2012
    george_liquor
    Better late than never. The thought of this never entered my mind when I was buying my Flash 29er...After reading this of course I had to try it.

    I can now say yes, mine does tend to track left but only very slightly. Could be the weight of my Incredibell mounted on the left side of the cockpit that could be causing it, or my poor (but improving) balance.
  • 12-03-2012
    fokof
    I just transferred my Lefty + wheel to another frame and I am now convinced more than ever , that the 'pull/push' phenomena is cable related.

    On my other setup , a 1FG with a Rohloff and hydros , I could ride no hand without any problem and on my new setup , the 4 cables passes on the same side of the frame and it "pushes" to the right. I can compensate but I definitly feel it more than I use to.


    It's the exact same fork and wheel , with two different cable running setups.