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Thread: Prophet advice

  1. #1
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    Prophet advice

    I got a Prophet 3z yesterday. I previously had an F600 so this is my first FS bike. There seem to be a ton of things you can tweak in on it! So on my first ride I noticed that I feel like I am going to lose control on my turns ~ is this just getting use to a FS?
    Also my tires are at the lowest PSI listed on the sidewall but still feels like it is too much. This is my first experience with tubeless tires also so I don't know if I can drop them a few pounds without causing any problems.
    Any advice on adjustments is welcome ~ I was looking at the Rush but then they took a nice chunk off the price for me so I went with the Prophet.

  2. #2
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    On my Prophet 4 medium. (i'm 5-11 and 170 lbs) I had the same feeling initially your describing. Turns were very touchy mainly on the downhill turns and when using the rear brake i felt like the Front shock was diving as if i had applied the front brakes instead. (granted the 4 is lefty, and 3z is traditional fork but maybe you feel the same?) I had at first thought a large frame would do the trick but i was wrong. I basically fit myself to the bike after that first initial ride. Slid the seat rearward did the most help, and then lowered the seat a 1/4 inch below what i would normally run it at. I then adjusted the suspension according to the C-Dale manual, and jacked the rear suspension to the FR position. I haven't meddled with tire pressure yet and am running at 50lbs starting pressure. Good thing bout your tubeless is you can run a lower pressure than me. Still thinking of a steering damper just to help hold a steady line on the downhill, but i am still undecided yet. I made a track in my backyard that i could run around a bit to get adjusted to my first FS bike as well. The Difference between my first ride on the trails and my second was almost night and day once all was said and done. I still feel an ever so slight dive in the front when using the rear brakes, but i may still need to just get use to the Full Suspension and my position when using a-lot of brake. Was wondering if any Lefty owners put a Hopey damper on before and how well it works?
    Last edited by Johni0574; 09-02-2007 at 05:56 PM.

  3. #3
    siv
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    Ive had a Prophet (2005 Brown 1000 with Lefty) for about a year and a half now and I think I finally after all this time have it setup to the point where I want to keep it. Was seriously considering going with another brand. What Ive learned: I used to run around 40-45 PSI in my tires and I weigh 200 LBS. I now run 30-35 PSI and find it better in every way. If you only weigh 170 you should start at 30PSI and see how it feels, I think too much tire pressure was making my front tire slide in the turns. Put your shock in the FR position to create a slacker head tube angle. Your BB height is still 13 inches, higher than most bikes in this class I think. The slack head angle will help handling on downhills and overall riding confidence I think. If you have a Lefty check your spring color. I ride a large and mine came with a red spring, apparently rated to up to 180 LBS. Ive always seemed to have problems on logs and around turns, pushing and sticking instead of rolling through and over turns and logs. I changed my spring to a black this weekend and while its a stiffer firmer feel, I love the way it goes through turns and doesnt seem to stall or bury itself over logs or other obstacles. Geometry wise see if your seat position and stem length are correct. I weigh 200 LBS and am 6 foot 1 riding a large. For me, I felt most comfortable with a layback seatpost and a 2-2.25 inch rise bar and am currently runing a 20 deg rise stem with a 110mm length. Search the forums, ask questions and experiment with springs, stems and seatposts. It sounds like a hassle but being inquisitive is free. Spending a hundred bucks on those components (used on e-bay) is better than spending another 2500 bucks on another bike. Hope this helps someone.

  4. #4
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    I am 5'7" and weigh 130. I also have a medium frame but I'm all arms and legs so I was cramped on the small frame. I have my tires at 30 now... maybe I'll try 25lb? that sounds really low but I'll try it.
    I have only got to ride my bike once. While my husband and I were out on our ride Saturday he wrecked and had to get stitches. Between that and my baby ... BUT tomorrow I will get my second ride in! Maybe I'll swap my rear suspension to the FR position also to see how that feels

  5. #5
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    Number one is get the sag right. I found the pamphlet suggestions way high - I was not using more than a couple of inches travel. Set the main air spring such that you get 1" or so sag sitting on the bike (get on gently). My experience is that if you go less than 30 -35 psi in the tires, they seem to flex alot and you'll fell less control especially in the rear end.

    If your lefty has a sag adjustment (preload), get it right too. If one end is stiffer than the other the bike (any bike) will pitch or stinkbug. Good luck!

    PS - it took me many months to try settings different tahn the Cannondale suggestions because I read in MBA that the setting suggestions were "spot on". Well, I hear to tell you the sag you get was nowhere near correct with those suggestions. I found the bike much more comfortable and the handling vastly improved.

  6. #6
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    130 pounds? Drop those tire's pressure! With tubeless tires, at your weight, you should have no issues going down to 25 PSI. I weigh 165 and usually ride with 26-27 PSI on the front and 27-30 PSI on the back. Never had air burps, no flats in the last 3-4 years I've been using Tubeless.

    For suspension settings, siv is right. Toss the Cannondale Setup guide in the recycling bin and use the sag method as a starting point. On a medium Prophet at your weight, you may need to change the stock Lefty spring to a softer one, you are on the light side for it but check sag first.

    Another thing is yes, you have to adapt and adjust to your new bike. I'm sure the Prophet is much taller than your previous bike and it takes some getting used to. Depending what you used to ride and where and how you ride, the bike might also give you a too laid back position or too much over the front wheel. I come from light aggressive XC bikes so I felt a bit high to far back on the Prophet at first. So I keep mine in XC and I even flipped my stem to a negative rise as I prefer to have more weight over the front tire, I can corner much faster that way and feel less like the front tire will wash out. Makes it a bit trickier in steep downhills but really is better on climbs and twisty trails to me. Others will prefer just the opposite but the beauty of the Prophet is that it really is adaptable from an aggressive XC machine to almost a freeride bike. You can make it what you want.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gerous
    130 pounds? Drop those tire's pressure! With tubeless tires, at your weight, you should have no issues going down to 25 PSI. I weigh 165 and usually ride with 26-27 PSI on the front and 27-30 PSI on the back. Never had air burps, no flats in the last 3-4 years I've been using Tubeless.

    For suspension settings, siv is right. Toss the Cannondale Setup guide in the recycling bin and use the sag method as a starting point. On a medium Prophet at your weight, you may need to change the stock Lefty spring to a softer one, you are on the light side for it but check sag first.

    Another thing is yes, you have to adapt and adjust to your new bike. I'm sure the Prophet is much taller than your previous bike and it takes some getting used to. Depending what you used to ride and where and how you ride, the bike might also give you a too laid back position or too much over the front wheel. I come from light aggressive XC bikes so I felt a bit high to far back on the Prophet at first. So I keep mine in XC and I even flipped my stem to a negative rise as I prefer to have more weight over the front tire, I can corner much faster that way and feel less like the front tire will wash out. Makes it a bit trickier in steep downhills but really is better on climbs and twisty trails to me. Others will prefer just the opposite but the beauty of the Prophet is that it really is adaptable from an aggressive XC machine to almost a freeride bike. You can make it what you want.
    Great Advice! I just purchased a NOS 2005 Prophet 1000 off of eBay and am eager to tinker and fiddle with the "Robocop" of bikes. This will be my first front suspension/full suspension bike, this will also be my first geared ride in 3 years.

    I know my first adjustment will be moving it to the "XC" position, as I'm not DH or FR. Aside from that, I'll be scratching my head over suspension adjustments, pre-loads, yadda yadda. I'm 5'10 -5'11, an athletic build fueled by weekend pancake, bacon, and donut binges, and weigh 172.

    Any good pointers for this old cromoly rigid rider, would be much appreciated!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetpropel
    I know my first adjustment will be moving it to the "XC" position, as I'm not DH or FR. Aside from that, I'll be scratching my head over suspension adjustments, pre-loads, yadda yadda. I'm 5'10 -5'11, an athletic build fueled by weekend pancake, bacon, and donut binges, and weigh 172.
    Well, start by setting a sag of about 25%-30% on the suspension, rebound about mid way then adjust to your liking.
    Quote Originally Posted by jetpropel
    Any good pointers for this old cromoly rigid rider, would be much appreciated!
    People who learned on rigid bike usually are among the best bike handlers. On a full rigid, you learn to pick the best lines and use your body much more to hop over things, help get good cornering or climbing grip... When you ride the Prophet, you'll still have the good habit of reading the terrain and picking the smoothest, fastest line, chances are your friends will have to call you Mr. Smooth...

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gerous
    Well, start by setting a sag of about 25%-30% on the suspension, rebound about mid way then adjust to your liking.People who learned on rigid bike usually are among the best bike handlers. On a full rigid, you learn to pick the best lines and use your body much more to hop over things, help get good cornering or climbing grip... When you ride the Prophet, you'll still have the good habit of reading the terrain and picking the smoothest, fastest line, chances are your friends will have to call you Mr. Smooth...
    Thanks for the advice! I think any trail absorbing setting would be to my liking. But the sag settings seem like great starting points, and I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of my new Dale.

  10. #10
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    I don't have the right manual for my shock so I guess I'll be back at my LBS Wednesday. They told me they only had a 2006 manual but it should be the same but the pictured shock and mine do not look alike at all

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