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  1. #1001
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    One more Uber offered up for your entertainment.

  2. #1002
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    One more Super V promoted to Uber

    Num chuk skills . . . picture attachment skills...stay tuned

  3. #1003
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    DaHose: hydraulic hose mounts....

    Hey Hose, wheredja get those little hyraulic hose clamp thingies visible in the closeup pic of yer headset/stem mount (post #988)? I like that neat little doodad!! I never knew those existed. I've been using a couple of zip ties to tie the brake hose to the derailleur cable but I never like the way it looked. Of course, on these older frames the cable bosses are too small for the hyd hose to pass thru, so we have to improvise, but that's exactly the piece needed to tidy things up. Please let me know where I can get a couple for my Uber.

    By the way, I like your bike!! Nice build!!!
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    '97 Cannondale Uber V
    '01 Kona Stinky Deeluxe
    '04 Santa Cruz Blur

  4. #1004
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    Those were first sold as aftermarket stuff from SAFE products. They were good for Magura rim brake hoses and then for disc hoses.

    Cannondale also had them as oem on our 99's with disc brakes. May have even come on later years also, but I beleive 2000 and newer have the twist the hose in and tywrap in place design.

    PK

  5. #1005
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    New '98 Uber in So Cal

    Before to after.. Picture #5 is what you might do if you don't have the special aluminum tool available to iseat your Lefty bearings...that's the top of a jackstand and a PVC collar from a spare toilet repair kit that I used to cushion the blow from my rubber mallet to the aluminum frame.
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  6. #1006
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    '98 So Cal Uber continued

    Picture #2 - This is the shape I left my grinding in. Didn't want to take any more meat off of the tabs.
    Picture #3 - Thought this "XL" stamp on my LG size Super V 700 was interesting.

    I'm enjoying this ride. Have had it out 4 times since finishing it, and still getting used to the new lighter rear end. Loving life ! I've been working towards this since January. About died once when I couldn't find the Uber V forum and thought it had been deleted.
    Got some compliments on the bike on its first outing at a local trail.

    Now who makes "Uber V" decals ?
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  7. #1007
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExCactus
    Dang! Just talked to the padre (this is the hand-me-down from when he bought a prophet) and he said it used to have a moto headshock up front and put the '99 super fatty on later so this is a '98... Hmm, not sure how much i trust my self with a drill and whatnot then. Any threads on not quite uber, but still nicely set up super-v's/ would I still get any benefit out of the jekyll swing arm with no drilling?
    Hey Cactus, I replied to your other post in the Cannondale forum but I didnt pay attention to your name so ignore the suggestion about posting in this thread.

    If you are really worried about drilling, you can start off by just going with an UBER "Lite", theres plenty examples of them being built that way here. You would just need to get a rear shock that is 6.5 rather than 7.5, with a Jekyll or recumbant swingarm. I almost went that route simply because I could not find a 7.5 DHX air, but I went with a 7.5 RP2 instead, which is working out fine for me. I am going to get it PUSH serviced to get the bottom out damping rather then getting a DHX anyway.

  8. #1008
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    I am in need of some Ad-Vice.
    I gota small 1999 Super V only upgrade so far is a cane creek6" rear shock.
    I want to change the the fork out though am concerned aboutgoing to a shock over 100mm
    due the fact that it is a small frame and was told I am unable to install a 7.5" rear shock so would not be able to compensate for the added length in the front end. Am I correct to worry about this? anyone have experience Ubering a small frame and any advice on a good fork?

    BTW I live in Florida so down hill is not an extreme big deal though that may change soon.
    Last edited by Dkoop; 07-06-2009 at 07:56 PM.

  9. #1009
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    Quote Originally Posted by heartfixer
    Hey Hose, wheredja get those little hyraulic hose clamp thingies visible in the closeup pic of yer headset/stem mount (post #988)?!
    I got mine from ChainReaction UK:
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...x?ModelID=1010

    But I'm into converting my cable routes to be zip-tie compatible. Will post some pics when I'm done... Kind of nervous with the Dremel



    CaNewby: How do you like your Monarch shock? I've been using a RockShox MC3R as an über lite shock, but it feels like sitting on a Pogo Stick when it's locked. Looking for a replacement to use with my newly bought Jekyll swingarm.

  10. #1010
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    dkoop I could not fit a 7.5 inch shock on my 97 uber size M
    dont know about the 99s tabs
    I am not an expert
    I see no trouble in running a longer fork in the front
    just lowers the head angle
    bettter for down hill
    just go talas and have it all

  11. #1011
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    Thanks for the input Joe. I am trying to get my mind around what I need to do and what I want to do to the bike and So I don't sdversly effect the ride and waste money. As far as I can see there are three reasons for ubering:
    1. Larger suspension.
    2. Stronger rear triangle
    3. Modification of geometry

    The first 2 are no brainers for me Larger is always better and Stronger is just plain stronger.

    The other question I have is as to why do you have to cut down the tabs? Does a 7.5" fit if you don't or does it change the geometry too much?

    The answer to this question will help me understand if there is a geometry issue to contend with. Otherwise I slapping a 7.5 on a small frame with a fork slightly larger should give me about the same geometry only more travel. Which might not be such a bad thing for me. Same steering, more travel, greater clearence, all good things.

    Along these lines has anyone tried putting a RUSH rear triangle on. From what I can see, it would probably extend the wheel base some if the pivot connection is the same. On looking closer I'm guessing the front derailure is the issue.

    Danny
    Last edited by Dkoop; 07-08-2009 at 06:43 AM.

  12. #1012
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    you cut the tabs so when you set the sag on the shock the arm should be in the same place as when you have your sag set or the shorter shock
    there are some years that you do not need to cut the tabs and I think 99 might be the one
    as far as changing the geometry that is done with the fork
    I keep my talas at 140 all the time because it slows the bike down a little and makes it easy to bomb down hills at speed
    we do not have any epic climbs in wisconsin so I dont set it to 100 much
    just post a pic of your bike and someone here will let you know if you can uber it
    they might also let you know what the welder had for lunch on the day it was built
    like I said I am not an expert but some guys here are

  13. #1013
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    Dkoop, I am not even sure you can UBER a small frame. I seem to remember reading that somewhere in this monster of a thread. I think the Medium size was the lowest you could go and that was pushing it, something to do with the amount of tab available to cut, but if you have a '99, it doesn't need cutting anyway, so that point is moot.

    However, I still don't think you can UBER a small frame, I think the best you could do is go with an UBER "Lite", which is essentially a 6.5 rear shock instead of a 7.5. The front fork will not compensate for how much a 7.5 rear shock will throw off your geometry. Sure it may only be an inch from a 6.5 to a 7.5, but on the bike it translates to something higher than a mere inch, it's all very mathematical and I can't say I really understand it. But I know it's detailed somewhere in this thread, you may just have to dig a bit if you want the exact detailed reasons.

    EDIT: Ok, I am probably wrong. Look here Danny: Small and Medium Frames (Tryon Bike Forums). You cannot tab mod a small frame for sure, but a '99 small frame will probably work as an UBER.
    Last edited by gdotbat; 07-08-2009 at 08:57 AM.

  14. #1014
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    A 99 frame needs no tab modification, so you should be able to Uber it without issue. Just make sure it is a 99 otherwise Uber light it is, Or just upgrade to a modern shock.

    You just want to make sure your front shock keeps the head tube angle somewhere in the 69-70 degree range.

  15. #1015
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    Yes it is a 1999, cause it has the small tab, though I think all small frames had a small tab (not Sure).

    If the cutting is done only for the sag, then I could potenially put one on, though the geometry and center of gravity would be higher and may be too much of an experiment seeing as I bought the bike for the ride in the first place. Probably a high tech 6.5 would work better and Uber-lite it. I wish I had money to experiment, maybe down the road if I start doing more downhill.

    The talas is the way to go and give me the flexability. Now where did I leave my check book? Anyway I'll have to change the fork out soon, I can't stand the stock one. It'll be worth the investment. I bought the bike as the last bike I'd own and love the little rascal too much.

    Great conversate always looking for input. I feel better about making the move. Though if anyone has experimented with a 7.5 on a small frame, or has other thoughts, let me know. I'm extremely curious to how it might ride.

    Danny

  16. #1016
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    Look at the edit in my last post, I think you will be ok to UBER the frame. The tab cutting on pre '99 frames was to add the additional length, between the Jekyll/Recumbent swingarm and the frame, so we could use a 7.5 rear shock. The pre '99 tabs on the Large and Med frames were too long and had the room to allow the cutting, the small frames were too small to cut. Your frames tab is already small enough so you dont need to cut it, and should be able to fit a 7.5 shock on it. Hopefully someone who acutally has UBER'ed a small frame will speak up and let you know definitly either way.

  17. #1017
    Uber V junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmex
    I got mine from ChainReaction UK:
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...x?ModelID=1010

    But I'm into converting my cable routes to be zip-tie compatible. Will post some pics when I'm done... Kind of nervous with the Dremel



    CaNewby: How do you like your Monarch shock? I've been using a RockShox MC3R as an über lite shock, but it feels like sitting on a Pogo Stick when it's locked. Looking for a replacement to use with my newly bought Jekyll swingarm.
    pmex,
    This is my first mtn bike, so I'm not speaking from a lot of experience...except that in comparison to the shorter Fox Vanilla that was on there, this one is a dream. I bought it by mistake on ebay...it came up in my search for Fox 32 or RC2, and I noticed after placing my bid that the seller was only saying this was the equivalent of that model I was searching for. So I've had about five rides on it now and several in front of my house. I love the change. It came with a pump. I had put it at 150 lbs and it was fine. Went to put it higher and it seems like air may have leaked out of it. So if that turns out to be true, I'll just be pumping it up every time I go out. Still happy with it though. The old Vanilla was very stiff and really didn't seem to add much value to the ride.

  18. #1018
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    I finally retired the Super-V... It's 10 years old and starting to show its age. Was a great bike - went through 2 Lefties before I replaced it with the Fox 36 - which is bomb proof. Machined a front triangle, rear shock mount that would take a 7.875" Fox RC, but never got around to installing it - I didn't want to take the chance of abusing the bonded swingarm too much. Good thing too, because after tearing the bike down to build the new, I found that the bonded swingarm was cracked in half (the two halves) at the pivot!!!

    She's now a wall hanger...



    The New....


  19. #1019
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    Retarded Windows IE...

    The New...


  20. #1020
    Sup
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    so you sold the kid to get a new frame and hammer schmidt crank
    should have just got a new rear arm and kept the kid
    some day you will relize you made the wrong choice
    he looked like a happy kid too
    what a shame
    bummer

  21. #1021
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    Nerk - I looked for a swingarm and ended up with a new frame instead... It was a glorious 10 years, the likes of which I watched C'dale go down the tubes. I liken that red rig as what C used to be, and what Intense is at the present. It's not every day that I drop big bucks on a bicycle frame, but I'll tell you this, it's everything they said it was, and to be quite honest, more than I'm capable of handling.

    I have a great Killer V, now the Super V hangs beside it. Personally, I'd like to build both those rides back up, but the cost to do so is outrageous, AND when you finally take your first ride on a HS - you won't go back, I promise you (one other reason for letting that great bike go off to MTBHeaven) LOL...

  22. #1022
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    Anybody interested in building a uber v?

    Hey guys i have a 1999 super v 900 (120mm rear travel) size medium. It has all brand new parts, but i haven't had much luck selling it. It's the perfect super v for a uber v conversion and it's more than half way there already. This forum is the only place i could find, where people would actually understand it's worth. If you or anybody you know is interested send me a message, i want to see if i can get $950 or so negotiable.
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  23. #1023
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    Well worth the asking price

    I saw this offered on eBay - nice list of parts. After having built one up, I wish I would have found one this far along at such a price. All he's lacking is the rear swing arm.

  24. #1024
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    Fox RP3

    Hi,

    I've been looking for a rear shock to complement my "newly" bought jekyll swingarm. Finally I have two used ones to choose from.

    1. Manitou Swinger 3 Coil 190x50 mm (the old one without piggy back)

    2. Fox float RP3 200x57

    I realize that I need to put some sort of "spacer" on the bike and measure the difference between 190 and 200 mm to see my fork angle but the main issue is regarding Coil vs Air and Manotou SPV vs Fox ProPedal.

    Any thoughts?

  25. #1025
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    so ive been a f-ing teeter totter on this issue but i think im really gonna sell what i have, i dont have the funds to make it work (medium black 99 i thinkpolicev front and 01 gloss black jekyll rear)
    i did acquire a headshock for the bike now so its a complete frame, and i also have a 7.875x2 shock on it with custom fittings. i have not cut the frame tabs on it,
    PM if interested
    sorry for the spam not something i do often as i usually post in the classifieds but figured since its such a specific thing
    if ya have a problem let me know and ill put it there
    thanks Uber fans
    No matter what you do, go ahead and take the chance and live a bit crazy
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    Http://jah9417.cias.rit.edu

  26. #1026
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmex
    Hi,

    I've been looking for a rear shock to complement my "newly" bought jekyll swingarm. Finally I have two used ones to choose from.

    1. Manitou Swinger 3 Coil 190x50 mm (the old one without piggy back)

    2. Fox float RP3 200x57

    I realize that I need to put some sort of "spacer" on the bike and measure the difference between 190 and 200 mm to see my fork angle but the main issue is regarding Coil vs Air and Manotou SPV vs Fox ProPedal.

    Any thoughts?
    IMO the Fox is the better shock. Unfortunately it is too long. You need the 190x50mm (7.5x2.0") size.

  27. #1027
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    IMO the Fox is the better shock. Unfortunately it is too long. You need the 190x50mm (7.5x2.0") size.
    So, should I wait a bit longer for a 190x50 RP2/RP3 or will the Swinger 3-way work?


    I'm mostly riding XC with few drops, so the ProPedal/SPV is a wanted feature.

    thanks

  28. #1028
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmex
    So, should I wait a bit longer for a 190x50 RP2/RP3 or will the Swinger 3-way work?


    I'm mostly riding XC with few drops, so the ProPedal/SPV is a wanted feature.

    thanks
    You definitely need a good pedaling platform for the Uber. The Fox is a safe bet. It works well with the Uber. I've never tried the Swinger on an Uber but the experiences I have had with the older Swingers were definitely disappointing.

    I broke my collarbone 2 months ago and it will be another couple months before I'm back in the saddle But over the last few rides I was experimenting with a low-volume (RP size) air sleeve on my DHX 5.0. I only had three rides on it so I can't fully evaluate it but my initial impressions were extremely positive. Several other Uber riders here have made the switch to the lower-volume air sleeve and they are all sold on it.

    The smaller air sleeve seems to naturally increase bottom-out resistance, which allowed me to significantly reduce the DHX's bottom-out damping. I ended up increasing sag from 25% to about 28% to get the small bump performance I wanted. I found that switching the propedal damping to the 'max' setting results in a much more dramatic effect. The pedaling performance was naturally so much better that I really didn't even find it necessary to use it most of the time. Out-of-the-saddle efforts are also much more effective. The bike definitely hops better now too as there is no longer that slight wallow at the bottom of the stroke.

    I won't be able to draw any final conclusions until I can go back and forth between the two air sleeves a couple of times. But what I experienced prior to the abrupt end of my riding season leads me to believe that the RP shock is probably going to work well for most riders. We stuck with the DHX for the bottom-out damping but I don't think it's necessary for most riders with a lower volume air sleeve.

  29. #1029
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    This is interesting Russ. So if I understand this correctly, you are evaluating the performance of the DHX air with an air sleeve from a Float RP2 or RP23? And it is performing better for you? Why not just evaluate an RP2 or RP23 straight up? Is it because you want to keep the bottom-out damping of the DHX?

    Have you ever tried a PUSH'ed RP? I was planning to get my RP2 pushed whenever it needed general servicing (I'm actually getting a bit of oil on the stanchion, so it may need it sooner than later), and I figured with the Factory Tuning and Big Hit service, it would give me a decent bottom-out dampening equivalent to the DHX.

  30. #1030
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdotbat
    This is interesting Russ. So if I understand this correctly, you are evaluating the performance of the DHX air with an air sleeve from a Float RP2 or RP23? And it is performing better for you? Why not just evaluate an RP2 or RP23 straight up? Is it because you want to keep the bottom-out damping of the DHX?
    Yes and yes. I didn't think of it though-
    DHX air upgraded with the RP3 air sleeve
    I would like to evaluate the Float RP but I just haven't yet. I always assumed I needed the bottom-out damping because we needed to use it on the DHX. I already have the DHX so the $30 air sleeve seemed like a pretty inexpensive experiment.

    Quote Originally Posted by gdotbat
    Have you ever tried a PUSH'ed RP? I was planning to get my RP2 pushed whenever it needed general servicing (I'm actually getting a bit of oil on the stanchion, so it may need it sooner than later), and I figured with the Factory Tuning and Big Hit service, it would give me a decent bottom-out dampening equivalent to the DHX.
    I haven't tried a PUSH'd shock on an Uber but from what I've seen on other frames, I'd bet that you won't be disappointed. How often are you bottoming-out your RP2?

    If all you need is basic air sleeve service, you can easily do it yourself. Oil on the stanchion is actually normal - especially just after service. The time to be most concerned is when the stanchion gets dry and sticky. That can lead to a quad-ring failure and a stuck-down shock - which can ruin a perfectly good ride.

  31. #1031
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    I haven't tried a PUSH'd shock on an Uber but from what I've seen on other frames, I'd bet that you won't be disappointed. How often are you bottoming-out your RP2?
    Honestly, I'm not sure how often I bottom out, or if I do at all. I do notice that I go through all of my travel on the rear shock pretty regularly, indicated by the sag ring on the stanchion, but I cant say that I have ever felt anything that would indicate a true bottom out, but then again I'm not really sure what to be looking for. I've read that you can "feel" or a "hear" when you bottom out, if this is true and it's not something that is subtle or easily missed, then I don't recall ever experiencing anything like that.

    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    If all you need is basic air sleeve service, you can easily do it yourself. Oil on the stanchion is actually normal - especially just after service. The time to be most concerned is when the stanchion gets dry and sticky. That can lead to a quad-ring failure and a stuck-down shock - which can ruin a perfectly good ride.
    I wasn't too sure if oil was a big deal or not, it actually just started a couple weeks ago, I had never seen oil on it before. I guess I wont worry about it.

    The PUSH service is actually in my "upgrade" plan regardless of whether the shock needs servicing or not. I had planned on it when I decided to get the RP2 over a DHX in the beginning. It's just last on the list of upgrades.

    Upgrade List (order of priority):
    1 - Crank Set (Shimano SLX M660)
    2 - Clip less Pedals and shoes
    3 - Powder coat frame (burnt orange color)
    4 - PUSH Fox RP2

  32. #1032
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    Long time since I have been here,

    if anyone is interested I'll be selling my super v (400) frame and Jekyll swingarm (+original and old fatty fork), it has the adjusters to use a regular fork,prime shape, mat black.

    It sits here in Belgium, i do not have the time to ride it anymore

    You can make an offer.
    Life is a ride

  33. #1033
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    So I'm wanting to put a chain guide on my 98' super v but I'm not sure with all of this ISCG crud and whatnot what chain guides are compatable. I'm pretty sure I've at least figured out that I dont have any sort of ISCG tabs on my frame so I'm just trying to figure out what chain guides are compatable/what mounting style it is I need. Would I be able to run a e 13 drs or blackspire stinger, or do all of these require ISCG tabs? Thanks for any help!

  34. #1034
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    Upgrade List (order of priority):
    1 - Crank Set (Shimano SLX M660)
    2 - Clip less Pedals and shoes
    3 - Powder coat frame (burnt orange color)
    4 - PUSH Fox RP2
    I'm upgrading my daughter's Trek 6000. and found the Shimano LX crank sets with chainrings and bottom bracket for about $60 - $65 on ebay. Not a bad deal. She just has a 1 x 9 setup now so I was looking for a coupla chainrings and for just a few bucks more can grab the whole set. Pedals and shoes will take a little getting used to but makes a huge difference. I use an RP3 and it serves me well. Not sure what to advise as to how stiff an RP2 internal Propedal setting. It is my understanding the RP2 does not have Propedal adjustment, but rather has a pre-set internal level. I might suggest RP3 so you can adjust it to your preference. The RP3 also has a "coarse" internal propedal setting that is dealer-adjustable. Mine is medium.

    Good luck!!!
    '97 Cannondale Uber V
    '01 Kona Stinky Deeluxe
    '04 Santa Cruz Blur

  35. #1035
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    IMO the Fox is the better shock. Unfortunately it is too long. You need the 190x50mm (7.5x2.0") size.
    Hey RW, I built my Uber with the Marzocchi AM1 @ 130mm travel, with the ETA lockout that lowers the front end for climbing. I noticed a while back on your Tryon bike Uber site you advise not to exceed 500 mm axle-to-crown length. Mine measures 525mm. I also quote above your advice to use the 190mm shock length, which I have on my bike (7.5" x 2" RP3).

    My question: if I have a fork that is too tall can I offset the front end height by using the 200mm (7.875 x 2) shock to bring the tail back up and get the headtube angle back in line. Have you or anyone else tried the longer shock along with a longer-travel (or tall-crown) fork? As the fork length gets up it really raises the front too high, as it does on my bike. For climbing I use the ETA lockout and drop the front end. While riding on the flats I can compenstate for the front-end height a little by increasing the fork sag to lower the front end, but then it becomes a little noodly in some spots. I can also put a tad more air in the rear shock to slightly decrease rear sag too, but it seems to mess up the ride quality if I change too much. I was thinking of trying the longer rear shock, or is the longer shock a big no-no that you suggest avoiding at all cost? My budget is limited so getting a nice Fox fork is probably out of the question for a year or so. Just curious.

    Also wondering how some builders can put 150mm or greater forks on without having HUGE front end issues. Could a longer rear shock be the answer?

    Edit: I just checked the FOX website for the rear shock lengths. They make the DHX air series shocks in 7.875 x 2.25, 8.5 x 2.5, 8.75 x 2.5, and even 9.5 x 3.0. What is to stop someone from Ubering with a longer i2i rear shock than the usual 7.5" length you guys recommend, especially if using a longer-travel fork? Comments??
    Last edited by heartfixer; 08-05-2009 at 11:34 AM.
    '97 Cannondale Uber V
    '01 Kona Stinky Deeluxe
    '04 Santa Cruz Blur

  36. #1036
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    Quote Originally Posted by heartfixer
    Hey RW, I built my Uber with the Marzocchi AM1 @ 130mm travel, with the ETA lockout that lowers the front end for climbing. I noticed a while back on your Tryon bike Uber site you advise not to exceed 500 mm axle-to-crown length. Mine measures 525mm. I also quote above your advice to use the 190mm shock length, which I have on my bike (7.5" x 2" RP3).

    My question: if I have a fork that is too tall can I offset the front end height by using the 200mm (7.875 x 2) shock to bring the tail back up and get the headtube angle back in line. Have you or anyone else tried the longer shock along with a longer-travel (or tall-crown) fork? As the fork length gets up it really raises the front too high, as it does on my bike. For climbing I use the ETA lockout and drop the front end. While riding on the flats I can compenstate for the front-end height a little by increasing the fork sag to lower the front end, but then it becomes a little noodly in some spots. I can also put a tad more air in the rear shock to slightly decrease rear sag too, but it seems to mess up the ride quality if I change too much. I was thinking of trying the longer rear shock, or is the longer shock a big no-no that you suggest avoiding at all cost? My budget is limited so getting a nice Fox fork is probably out of the question for a year or so. Just curious.

    Also wondering how some builders can put 150mm or greater forks on without having HUGE front end issues. Could a longer rear shock be the answer?

    Edit: I just checked the FOX website for the rear shock lengths. They make the DHX air series shocks in 7.875 x 2.25, 8.5 x 2.5, 8.75 x 2.5, and even 9.5 x 3.0. What is to stop someone from Ubering with a longer i2i rear shock than the usual 7.5" length you guys recommend, especially if using a longer-travel fork? Comments??
    With the 3:1 leverage ratio of the Uber, every additional inch of eye-to-eye of the shock results in 3 inches at the rear wheel which translates to well over 2 inches of bottom bracket height. This really takes away from the stable ride quality of the Uber as a trailbike.

    With regard to the crown height question. I think THIS is the post you are referring to. I wasn't suggesting that you shouldn't use a taller fork. I just don't recommend using the tall adapter cone under the headtube if you do. The exception to this is if you run a travel-adjustable fork. For example, I currently have a TALAS 150 with the 15QR on my Uber (520mm a2c). I have the tall (25mm) adapter under the headtube but I only run the fork in full travel for downhills. Most of the time I have the TALAS set in the 130mm position, which results in an a2c of 500mm. If the front end gets too tall the HT angle gets too slack and the bike won't be as nimble or climb as well, which is a compromise I'm not willing to make for my style of riding.

    You can see my experiment with a Fox 36 and a 7.875 i2i shock if you look back at THIS POST and THIS POST.

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    By wowaddanc, shot with DSC-V3 at 2009-08-09
    Cannondale superV500
    Cannondale F600comp

  39. #1039
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    With the 3:1 leverage ratio of the Uber, every additional inch of eye-to-eye of the shock results in 3 inches at the rear wheel which translates to well over 2 inches of bottom bracket height. This really takes away from the stable ride quality of the Uber as a trailbike.

    With regard to the crown height question. I think THIS is the post you are referring to. I wasn't suggesting that you shouldn't use a taller fork. I just don't recommend using the tall adapter cone under the headtube if you do. The exception to this is if you run a travel-adjustable fork. For example, I currently have a TALAS 150 with the 15QR on my Uber (520mm a2c). I have the tall (25mm) adapter under the headtube but I only run the fork in full travel for downhills. Most of the time I have the TALAS set in the 130mm position, which results in an a2c of 500mm. If the front end gets too tall the HT angle gets too slack and the bike won't be as nimble or climb as well, which is a compromise I'm not willing to make for my style of riding.

    You can see my experiment with a Fox 36 and a 7.875 i2i shock if you look back at THIS POST and THIS POST.
    I find it interesting that you get 150mm travel with only 520mm a2c length, while my Marz is 130mm travel @ 525 a2c. I had not realized the differences in dimensions from one manufacturer to another. I think it is good that you have tried to define the limits of acceptable component dimensions for those wanting to do an Uber-build. I might not have purchased the Marz originally had I seen the list of components to avoid. At the time I was purchasing wheels and disc brakes on the same order along with the fork, and I only had so much $ available. But the fork conversion made such a HUGE improvement in the ride!! I have been very happy over all with the Marz. I am getting deep into "fine-tuning" the ride by trying different combos of front and rear pre-load, stem height, seat position (forward or rearward, etc, and i belive the front end is a bit on the high side for climbing. I think one solution for me is to fab a "pop-lock" remote lockout lever so I can actuate it from the handlebar without having to reach down. I sometimes forget to release the ETA lockout and find myself being thrashed on a DH run and realize I forgot the fork lockout.

    Thanks for the info. I had not realized you already mounted the longer shock and posted the results. I might try that conversion too and see how the bike feels. I have a shock available to me, so I might be able to swap it hit the trails within the next couple of weeks.

    But I had also wondered what the "theoretical limits" of Uberdom are. I wonder what the Ultimate Uber setup is, or is that the Uber Uber?

    Thanks for your reply.
    '97 Cannondale Uber V
    '01 Kona Stinky Deeluxe
    '04 Santa Cruz Blur

  40. #1040
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    Looking to Turn my 1996 Super V 2000 in an Uber-lite

    Just started mountain riding again after a stretch on the road. After a couple of rides, my rear shock (stock Alps4) won't hold pressure. After some searching on the internet, I stumbled onto this forum. What a revelation!!!! Well done, all of you. I have always loved my Super V, it's great to see that after some modernizing, it can still hold it's own. Onto my project. I found some Super Fatty Ultra DLR's (polished, to match my bike) in new condition on Ebay for $200. I jumped on those bad boys. I still need to replace my rear shock, so I thought I would do a little upgrade there as well. I was wondering if any of you guys out there is still have their old Super V rear end and would be interested in selling it. I would like to go 100-120mm. Need mounting for Disc brakes, and would prefer black. And I will still need to purchase a shock. Any suggestions? I have the long tabs, will I need to shorten them? I would prefer not to, as I do not plan on refinishing an already beautifull polished frame. I am not a balls-out rider and do not need 6 inches of travel, but would enjoy a more controlled suspension. Thanks again for a great thread!!

  41. #1041
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    updating the progress on my uber lite conversion

    It was just 2 days ago when I discovered there was such a thing as an Uber V. I now have everything needed for the conversion either bought or ordered and on the way.

    Many thanks to the Uber Guru, Craig at Mendon Cyclesmith. He luckily had one Jeckyll style swingarm left in stock. Unfortunately, he said that he probably will not be able to get any more new ones from Cannondale. I just may have been the lucky one to get the very last one made. Color is charcoal grey, my intention was to powdercoat any swimgarm that I get the original color, flat black, but this will be close enough that I will leave it as is.

    Other parts on their way are: A new 2010 Fox rp23, 6.5x1.5, spaced 22mm in the front, 15.8mm in the rear. New wheelset: found a greal deal on some NOS WTB fx28 rims with Deore XT hubs with 6 bolt disc mounting. Brakes are Avid BB7, 185 for the front, 160 on the back. Forks are the Super Fatty Ultra DLR's that started this whole mess.

    I will leave the drivetrain alone for now. Rear hub will accept either 8 or 9 speed, so I can update later if needed.

    The other cool thing is if I wish later on to go full-uber, I can drill out my tabs, put in a 7.5x2 shock, put in longer forks and I'm good to go!!

    I have taken some "before" photos, will post them along with the "after" pics when the deed is done.

    Thanks again to all the previous posters and all the great information shared. I feel that I am undertaking this project very well prepared.

  42. #1042
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    Long time no post...recently got back from a vacation spent in Durango. Great riding on the uber out there!


  43. #1043
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    Little help please...

    Have a few questions for all you Uber experts.

    First, a little background.

    The bike is a 96 Super V 3000. Just picked it up today from a Pawn shop, and it is seriously trashed, but for the price, ($125) I just couldn't pass it up.

    Was thinking about restoring it, as I have several Super V bikes and frames from various years. Thought it would be nice to bring it back to life.

    The bad news, the swingarm has a nasty dent in the right seat stay. The Good news is I had a spare from a later model frame, so I swapped it on for now.

    I have a friend who is a framebuilder, and am considering modifying the original, to the dimensional specs of an Uber, and adding disc mounts to it. Basically, I will cut the seat tube/derailleur mount off, and machine shock mount, and tig it into place, and then bend new stays and replace the broken ones.

    I'm really not sure if I want all that travel, but I would like to bring mine into the 4" zone, as I am more about fast singletrack than FR. Besides, I have an old Super V 4000 DH that has been converted fairly sucessfully to FR status. (Don't worry, I have not made any irreversible mods to the bike)

    Have to decide what fork to use, as I have a nember of headshocks, including a 70, a Moto 100 FR, and the Moto120 from the DH frame.

    For now, I think I will stick with the swingarm I currently have on the frame, but would like some input on the longest shock I can get away with in that configuration. Looks to be about 6.5 inches, if I drill the tabs.

    Then again, if anyone has an Uber swingarm they want to part with, I would certainly consider that.

    Thanks,
    Doug

  44. #1044
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowerJoe
    hi my name is Joe and I am a cannoholic

    Just tripped over this post, that is exactly what I was thinking of doing, with minor variances in the details.

  45. #1045
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    Re: Doug's Uber project

    Hey Doug,
    I'm almst done with my Uber-lite project. I've read all the posts in this thread and have spoken with Craig of Mendon Cyclesmith. I'm more than happy to share what I have learned. The first question would be, what size is the frame? The front tabs need to be drilled back 7/8", so they need to be long enough to be able to do that. If you can drill the tabs, you can keep the stock swingarm and put a 6.5" shock with 1.5" of travel. The super v's travel ratio is 3:1 so that will give you 4.5 inches of travel. By getting a newer propedal (platform) shock, you can significantly reduce pogoing up the climbs. If you change the swingarm to the newer "Jeckyll" type, you won't need to drill the tabs to mount the 6.5" shock. (This is what I did.) If you change the swingarm and drill the tabs, you can mount a 7.5x2 shock and get 6" of travel. (Full Uber.) If you wish to modify your existing swingarm, I would suggest copying the Jeckyll design as close as possible.

    As to your forks, it's really up to you. If you're looking for more of a XC / AM bike, then weight is a factor. If you wish to go full uber, most people are putting 140-160mm forks on. They are using reducers and mounting standard size forks. I'm building an Uber-lite, I've mounted some Fatty Ultra DLR's with 80mm of travel.

    Good luck with your project.

  46. #1046
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    Tony's UberV600

    Hello all,

    what a torn boot can do!! some time ago i posted on the c'dale forum about changing
    the boot af a MC60 and now i ended up with a lefty speed DLR2 on it
    i made this upgrade because the original headshok wasn't good and its amazing
    how the bike now rides and feels with the lefty what a difference that is!!!
    WOW
    the next step i want to do is to change the swingarm for one with disc-mount on it,
    but not one from the jekyll because than i have to buy a longer rear shock. i don't need more travel at the rear because
    i mainly will use the bike for XC race. for the hard work i have the prophet with 140mm of travel :-)
    i prefer the active swingarm like mine but later model with disc-mount.
    than i can install the rear XT brake . for now V-brake at the rear.
    also want to upgrade to XT holowtechII crank .

    one problem: the color! its difficult to find a swingarm in the same color,
    how should you do it? new paintjob with new decals?
    can you purchase the original looking decals somewhere?

    ciao
    below you can find some pictures :














  47. #1047
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    After a great deal of thought, I have decided not to Uber my Super V.

    One of the deciding factors is the fact that I already have a Super V 4000DH, and it really doesn't excite me all that much. It originally had the 8X2.25 shock, and I replaced it with a 7.5X2, to slacken the front end a bit, and that helped a lot, but it is really not what I enjoy the most. I can always Shuttle that bike if I feel the urge.

    My build is going to be more along the lines of taking mine to a later factory configuration (120), with about 25% sag. Will install the Moto120DH on it to level things out a bit.

    I think that will suit me, and my riding style more than going the extra distance, and swapping swing arms. A few minutes with the drill, and I will be where I want. I will probably repair/mod my spare swing arm, just to do some comparison tests, possibly even incorporate replacable shock mounts, so I can experiment with different shock length options,


    I have a few spare shocks, but I definately could use a 6.5X1.5, if anyone has one left over from their build.

    Anyways,

    Thanks for listening to my tirade. Any input is welcome.

    Doug
    Last edited by VintageFolly; 09-24-2009 at 06:23 PM.

  48. #1048
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    It's an "Uber" small world!

    Quote Originally Posted by VintageFolly
    I have a few spare shocks, but I definately could use a 6.6X1.5, if anyone has one left over from their build.
    Bummer. I just sold my original fox Vanilla from my 1999 Super V about a month ago. Keeo looking. They are out there. If you happen to run across a Manitou 4 way air in that size, snatch it up. They work great on the Super V.
    -------------------------------------------------------
    So, I'm walking around Interbike the other day and I see a guy wearing a "Tryon Bike Club" jersey. I stop to chat with him to see if he knows Russ.

    He not only knows Russ. . . . He IS Russ!

    Nice to meet you Russ. Hope you had fun out west!

  49. #1049
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    Shocking...

    Hey guys, so what's the hot shock to use on the Uber these days? Seen below is a pic of my Uber V from back in it's glory days of '07. Unfortunately, she's been down for the count for nearly 2 years now. I'm thinking of either resurrecting her, or parting her out.

    The bike was originally built with a 5th Element air shock but after just a year of riding, the rear bushing disintegrated and, of course, you can't find parts for Progressive shocks anymore. I liked the way that shock rode even though I had to run it at the max end of the psi scale to support my fat arse... it was a nice set-it-and-forget-it piece of equipment while it lasted. I would like something with similar ride characteristics but I am unfamiliar with today's shocks (been riding 29er rigid SS for 2 yrs) and so I am seeking the advice of the wise elders of the Uber clan in order to find a suitable replacement. I have never owned a FOX (sacrilege, I know), and I am a bit confused by all the different models, options and acronyms. So, what is the best match for the Uber's 3:1 hind end? RP3? RP23? Standard can? High Volume can? Foster's Oil can??? FWIW, I'd prefer a shock that I didn't have to flip a lever every single time I want to climb a hill, or fly down one. I'm certainly not opposed to non-FOX components either.

    So what say you, Gents... any recommendations?

    P.S. If I recall correctly, the spacing was 22mm/front 15.8/rear, correct? How hard is it to obtain bushings for FOX and other brands? I see a lot of shocks for sale around the interwebs, but they seldom have the right bushings.

    Bike 040b.jpg
    "America is all about speed... Hot, nasty, badass speed!!!"
    -Eleanor Roosevelt, 1936

  50. #1050
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj
    So, I'm walking around Interbike the other day and I see a guy wearing a "Tryon Bike Club" jersey. I stop to chat with him to see if he knows Russ.

    He not only knows Russ. . . . He IS Russ!

    Nice to meet you Russ. Hope you had fun out west!
    It was nice meeting you too Jeff! We had a great time. It was great riding all of those different bikes one after another. We learned a lot but I wish we had more time. Next year I will definitely plan on attending both Dirt Demo sessions. I have to say I was pretty impressed with some of the DW-link bikes. But it was still nice to come home and get back on my Uber...

  51. #1051
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notch Johnson
    Hey guys, so what's the hot shock to use on the Uber these days? Seen below is a pic of my Uber V from back in it's glory days of '07. Unfortunately, she's been down for the count for nearly 2 years now. I'm thinking of either resurrecting her, or parting her out.

    The bike was originally built with a 5th Element air shock but after just a year of riding, the rear bushing disintegrated and, of course, you can't find parts for Progressive shocks anymore. I liked the way that shock rode even though I had to run it at the max end of the psi scale to support my fat arse... it was a nice set-it-and-forget-it piece of equipment while it lasted. I would like something with similar ride characteristics but I am unfamiliar with today's shocks (been riding 29er rigid SS for 2 yrs) and so I am seeking the advice of the wise elders of the Uber clan in order to find a suitable replacement. I have never owned a FOX (sacrilege, I know), and I am a bit confused by all the different models, options and acronyms. So, what is the best match for the Uber's 3:1 hind end? RP3? RP23? Standard can? High Volume can? Foster's Oil can??? FWIW, I'd prefer a shock that I didn't have to flip a lever every single time I want to climb a hill, or fly down one. I'm certainly not opposed to non-FOX components either.

    So what say you, Gents... any recommendations?

    P.S. If I recall correctly, the spacing was 22mm/front 15.8/rear, correct? How hard is it to obtain bushings for FOX and other brands? I see a lot of shocks for sale around the interwebs, but they seldom have the right bushings.

    Bike 040b.jpg
    I love my Fox DHX Air 5.0. It is exceptional now that I switched to the low-volume air sleeve. The lower volume makes the bike feel more lively (less wallow) and also improves efficiency. The only time I ever switch the propedal to 'max' is on the road or on long, smooth climbs. The 'min' setting is great for most trail riding. I prefer that the shock remain active for technical climbing.

    If you are a lighter-weight rider you might get away with the RP23. Heavier riders are probably better off with the DHX because of the adjustable bottom-out damping.

    Fox shock bushings are not hard to come by. They are included if you order a new shock. I can also order them separately from Fox but it's probably easier to get them here:
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm?stylePkey=18033

  52. #1052
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    action pics

    some action pics of me, saturday in a 3 hour race.






  53. #1053
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    Jeckyll swingarm crank clearance problem

    I've been working on my uber-lite conversion. I was trying to re-use the stock 1996 coda 701m cranks. The problem was the left crank wouldn't clear the new jeckyll swingarm. I replaced the bottom bracket with a wider (122mm) one, and that fixed the clearance problem. But now my chain line is way off.

    I know I can get a Phil Wood bb that is adjustable, but I am eventually going to have to replace that coda crankset, the chainrings are not replaceable.

    I'm looking for a BB/Crankset combo that will clear the swingarm but still have that 49-50mm chainline.

  54. #1054
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    Congratulations. Nice bike!

    Quote Originally Posted by BigToe
    This is my current Uber...

    '98 front with cut tabs, 5th Element Air, '04 Jekyll Rear, Maverick DUC32, Mavic 823, Avid Juicy Carbons, Saint crank with SRAM X.0 drivetrain... lots of misc goodies. It's rockin' 150mm of travel front and rear, 68.5 degree head angle and comes in at about 30lbs even... and that's with the fat tires, a stout AM wheelset and the burly Saint crank. There have been minor changes since this photo was taken, but nothing noteworthy.

    It's funny how many odd reactions I get on the trail... I get a lot of comments from people thinking that it's a heavy "freeride" bike. HAHA!! I laugh at that one every time I'm motoring up a hill like a goat, or blasting a descent like a banshee! This bike is so good at everything, so balanced, so comfortable, so perfect, it's like having an unfair advantage, I almost feel like like I'm cheating.

    Since deploying the Uber this season, I've made hobby out of going into dealers, riding their "best" offerings, then walking out, shaking my head, and feeling sorry for the Uber-less population, which is usually followed shortly by uncontrollable maniacal laughter

    Attachment 275795

  55. #1055
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    You can easily buy bushings and spacers for any shock. I bought from this ebay seller: http://myworld.ebay.com/mtnbiker4life/






    Quote Originally Posted by Notch Johnson
    Hey guys, so what's the hot shock to use on the Uber these days? Seen below is a pic of my Uber V from back in it's glory days of '07. Unfortunately, she's been down for the count for nearly 2 years now. I'm thinking of either resurrecting her, or parting her out.

    The bike was originally built with a 5th Element air shock but after just a year of riding, the rear bushing disintegrated and, of course, you can't find parts for Progressive shocks anymore. I liked the way that shock rode even though I had to run it at the max end of the psi scale to support my fat arse... it was a nice set-it-and-forget-it piece of equipment while it lasted. I would like something with similar ride characteristics but I am unfamiliar with today's shocks (been riding 29er rigid SS for 2 yrs) and so I am seeking the advice of the wise elders of the Uber clan in order to find a suitable replacement. I have never owned a FOX (sacrilege, I know), and I am a bit confused by all the different models, options and acronyms. So, what is the best match for the Uber's 3:1 hind end? RP3? RP23? Standard can? High Volume can? Foster's Oil can??? FWIW, I'd prefer a shock that I didn't have to flip a lever every single time I want to climb a hill, or fly down one. I'm certainly not opposed to non-FOX components either.

    So what say you, Gents... any recommendations?

    P.S. If I recall correctly, the spacing was 22mm/front 15.8/rear, correct? How hard is it to obtain bushings for FOX and other brands? I see a lot of shocks for sale around the interwebs, but they seldom have the right bushings.

    Bike 040b.jpg

  56. #1056
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    Quote Originally Posted by maestronius
    I've been working on my uber-lite conversion. I was trying to re-use the stock 1996 coda 701m cranks. The problem was the left crank wouldn't clear the new jeckyll swingarm. I replaced the bottom bracket with a wider (122mm) one, and that fixed the clearance problem. But now my chain line is way off.

    I know I can get a Phil Wood bb that is adjustable, but I am eventually going to have to replace that coda crankset, the chainrings are not replaceable.

    I'm looking for a BB/Crankset combo that will clear the swingarm but still have that 49-50mm chainline.
    personally I am running an XTR with external bottom bracket with no clearance or chainline issues.

    Looks like new cranks and rings are in your future.

  57. #1057
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    Quote Originally Posted by maestronius
    I've been working on my uber-lite conversion. I was trying to re-use the stock 1996 coda 701m cranks. The problem was the left crank wouldn't clear the new jeckyll swingarm. I replaced the bottom bracket with a wider (122mm) one, and that fixed the clearance problem. But now my chain line is way off.

    I know I can get a Phil Wood bb that is adjustable, but I am eventually going to have to replace that coda crankset, the chainrings are not replaceable.

    I'm looking for a BB/Crankset combo that will clear the swingarm but still have that 49-50mm chainline.
    Any outboard bearing crankset should work fine.

  58. #1058
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    Success! Finally!

    It took way too long but my Uber-lite conversion is finally complete! I hit a couple of snags along the way. My ebay seller for the disc brakes never sent them, never responded to my emails. I had to file a claim with paypal. My old cranks didn't clear the new swingarm, tried a longer BB but that threw my chainline way off. I finally just replaced the entire drivetrain, FSA Afterburner cranks, SRAM X-9 Derailleurs and gripshifter. 11-34 cassette. She's a real mountaingoat now. Nice for the very steep climbs on my neighborhood trail. Here's the before and after.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your UBER V !!!!!!!!!!!-oldbike.jpg  

    Post your UBER V !!!!!!!!!!!-newbike.jpg  


  59. #1059
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    Hi all. I'm confused...

    I''m in the process of uber-liting my Cannondale. I have a 1998 Cannondale Super V1000FR (with large tab) that I will be mating to a Cannondale Jekyll swingarm using a Manitou Swinger 4-Way Airshock (6.5" eye to eye). I have no plans to modify the tab.

    Based on what I've read, that should give me 4.5" of rear travel (or 114.3mm). But the stock rear travel for the Super V1000FR is 120mm (4.7"). Shouldn't I be getting more travel? Or is there something specific to the FR series of Super Vs that's different to all other V's?

    Thanks in advance.

  60. #1060
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcopy.exe
    Hi all. I'm confused...

    I''m in the process of uber-liting my Cannondale. I have a 1998 Cannondale Super V1000FR (with large tab) that I will be mating to a Cannondale Jekyll swingarm using a Manitou Swinger 4-Way Airshock (6.5" eye to eye). I have no plans to modify the tab.

    Based on what I've read, that should give me 4.5" of rear travel (or 114.3mm). But the stock rear travel for the Super V1000FR is 120mm (4.7"). Shouldn't I be getting more travel? Or is there something specific to the FR series of Super Vs that's different to all other V's?

    Thanks in advance.
    We've found that the actual travel varies a bit depending on model year due to tab placement. The leverage ratio is approximately 3:1 but it does vary over the stroke.

  61. #1061
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    any standard headshoks out there?

    With all the replacing of the front forks to leftys or traditional twin tube forks there should be someone wanting to sell a standard headshok. I want one with the disc brake tabs and also that take air. Matt black might be asking too much I suppose.

  62. #1062
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    Uber Frame and Swingarm Weight

    Hey all. I did a search looking for the weight of the frame parts and wasn't able to find any discussion on it (which I thought was surprising considering how many ubers are on here).

    Does anyone know the weight (in grams) of the following:
    Super V Front Triangle (M and/or L)
    Jekyll Rear Swingarm (with pivot bearings)
    CAAD4 Swingarm (with pivot bearings)
    Pivot Bolt (Black)
    Pivot Bolt (Silver)

    Thanks in advance.

  63. #1063
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    Finished my Uber Lite last night, though I did mine backwards.

    Due to being a cheap-o, I wasn't going to buy a "new" swingarm, but at the same time I wanted to upgrade the rear shock. I have a '99 SVAL frame, and took some quick measurements. Original shock was 5.7" eye to eye. Based on a quick look, I figured I could fit a 6.5" shock w/ modifying the tabs. Picked up a used Fox RP23 and took the plunge last night cutting the frame.

    First comment, I'd say 6.5" is about all you can do w/ just tab modifying. Should I change swing-arms later, I'll be set for even more though.

    I'll try to get some pictures later, but first impressions were great last night. Damping characteristics and the propedal feature on the new shock seem improved over the old coil sprung Vanilla that originally came on the frame. And I'll like having the flexibility of air to adjust the spring rate.

  64. #1064
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    Hardrvin, just curious, '99 frame shouldn't need tab modification. Guess you're having a '98 SV?

  65. #1065
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    Hmm...not positive which frame I have. You may be well correct, I bought it around 97~99 when C-dale was doing they're frame swap deal. I traded in an old junk frame and picked up the SV frame.

    But note that I did NOT change the rear swingarm. So I went from a 5.7" shock to a 6.5" strictly by modifying the tab.

    Not sure, did the 99+ frames come w/ 6.5" shock from the get go?

  66. #1066
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    Took it for a ride today. Have to say that I'm a believer in prodpedal. Pretty big difference between it being on and off. Bike rides really well as well now that I've set up the sag properly. Head tube angle feels better than before.

  67. #1067
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    Good job! Sweet Uber for Sale in MTBR Classifieds!!!

    A buddy of mine is selling a large Uber.

    See the listing here:

    http://classifieds.mtbr.com/showprod...?product=44137

  68. #1068
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    Last ride of 2009 for my 99 Uber V

    I found some time to get in one final ride of 2009 yesterday in CT on my 1999 V900. It was the first ride with the studded tires on this winter and the extra clearance of the new swing arm is a nice additional improvement. Many thanks to everyone for the inspiration for the latest round of changes. I'll post some earlier version photo's at some point.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your UBER V !!!!!!!!!!!-99uberv900.jpg  


  69. #1069
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    My New Toy

    Got a Super V 700 for police patrol about 11 or so years ago. Rode it pretty much on the streets mildly for a while, then got reassigned and put the bike away. Reading about the Uber V conversion here was like a free hit of crack...I got hooked and that addiction cost me time and money. I was just going to do the forks, but then I got an offer for a better set at a good price. Then I went with the swingarm / shock mod. That meant disc brakes, so why not go with hydraulics? Disc brakes meant I should get better wheels, and since I'm getting new wheels, might as well get new tires and keep the original wheels/tires together. So, I now have some pristine Super V 700 parts for sale (fork/wheel assembly, swingarm wheel assembly, brakes, levers, etc.). My pocketbook is lighter, but check out my new toy!



    I needed a more upright riding position so I changed the stem to an adjustable and got new bars. Rode it today and it was more comfortable for me...sort of a cruiser like body position. When I want a lower position, I can adjust the stem, which is a monster and very solid.



    Here's a spot 8 minutes from my house.

    Last edited by eltee; 01-29-2010 at 03:11 PM.

  70. #1070
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    Nice, eltee-- I with you on the addiction. I'm about 2 weeks away from mine being done.
    It is quite the learning experience. But you should know by perusing this site constantly
    that you have to list your components. In particular, what is that front fork??

    s-mac

  71. #1071
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    Ditto - what's the front fork ?

  72. #1072
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaNewby
    Ditto - what's the front fork ?

    I'd guess JR T with a set of polished Z1 lower legs and hand polished triple clamps.

    If it were a later fork, the tubes should be black not gold.

    PK

  73. #1073
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    They are Marzocchi Jr. T Pros. Probably circa 2001 or 02. Rebuilt by the seller with new internals, seals, etc. Got a deal on them vs. a new set. The LBS checked them out and told me they were rebuilt to like new specs so I saved money by buying used ones. Juicy brakes, Heim bashguard added after this photo taken, but it allows all 3 rings to remain. Also added some 4" wide black Velcro to the swingarm to quiet the chain and protect the arm. I am totally new to all this so I am learning as I progress. Now I am trying to deal with how to get this on my bike rack (old Rhodes Gear hitch mount) without wrestling with it all the time.

  74. #1074
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    In the midst of my 97' Super V900 conversion to an Uber-Lite. I am having a hell of a time deciding which rear shock to get. I am a complete tight ass with money so spending $300 or more on a rear shock and $200 or so on a swingarm is getting me wound up. Any suggestions on an inexpensive shock? New Manitou fork is 100mm to 140mm is that makes a difference.

  75. #1075
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    1998 super v 900

    heres my 1998 super v 900. it has a fox shock and magura hydraulic v brakes. got it with extras for $500. i might upgrade the forks soon to a traditional style.

  76. #1076
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    Been a while since I visited this thread. Nice to see more uber's populating the hinterlands.

    jhbinal - You can still find the 5th elements on ebay.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Progressive-Susp...item19b95347b1

    That's a great value and it works for my clydesdale, 250 lb. butt.

    Jose

  77. #1077
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    Uber

    Thanks for the response DaHose...

    I'm stoked, I just landed an 04' swingarm off ebay and will be going full uber...wonder if I should put the old swingarm and headshok on ebay...no lcue what they might go for though. Regardless, I am very excited!

    Anyway, now I'll be looking for a 7.5" rear shock...

    I'll post pics once the frame and swingarm get back from powder coating...

  78. #1078
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    Can't wait to see how it turns out. Can you let me know how much the powder coating coosts?

    I have a bunch of parts I should sell off as well. I have the original CODA cranks, the stock swingarm and a set of Answer downhill forks. The forks are year 2000 models and work/look fine, but they are sprung WAY to light for me. Since I couldn't find springs and elastomers to up the weight, replacement was my only option.

    If you look at my setup, I didn't move my shock forward. Coupled with the very tall forks, sag ends up with the perfect head angle. This is really my first nice MTB, but I can climb in the saddle with no bob, whereas lighter guys stand on their hard tails. If I stand on it and climb it will bob, so a Fox shock with lockout might have been a better choice for me. However, when we run downhill, I have to ride my brakes or run right up my riding partner's spines. This thing is SUPER stable on downhill runs, even with my lower level of experience. In that situation, the equipment is a major equalizer.

    Jose

  79. #1079
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    Rear shock uber light

    finaly i bouth a jekyll style swingarm (cross brace between the stays just behind the pivot)
    and want to make sure that a 6.5inch ( 165mm) rear shock (eye to eye) is the correct one for the uber light conversion?
    i will post some pics later. also gonna strip the paint of the frame.

  80. #1080
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfa75
    finaly i bouth a jekyll style swingarm (cross brace between the stays just behind the pivot)
    and want to make sure that a 6.5inch ( 165mm) rear shock (eye to eye) is the correct one for the uber light conversion?
    i will post some pics later. also gonna strip the paint of the frame.
    The 6.5 is the right shock for the uber lite if you have a long-tab frame ('96-'98, '00-'03).

  81. #1081
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    The 6.5 is the right shock for the uber lite if you have a long-tab frame ('96-'98, '00-'03).
    my frame is with 'long-tab '! from'97 i think.


  82. #1082
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfa75
    my frame is with 'long-tab '! from'97 i think.
    Yes - '97 Long Tab

  83. #1083
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    just a question, what if i install my 6inch (152mm) shock with the new swingarm?
    will the geometry change a lot?

  84. #1084
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfa75
    just a question, what if i install my 6inch (152mm) shock with the new swingarm?
    will the geometry change a lot?
    Yes. The BB will drop about an inch and the headtube angle will be about 1.5 degrees slacker.

  85. #1085
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    can anyone tell the MY of this jekyll swingarm

    i both it for 211 dollars (150 euro) very low dollar for us
    and in very good shape! can anyone tell the moderyear? today i will remove the paint! of the front triangle.







  86. #1086
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    <object width="320" height="265"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/JeEqH5ph2EQ&hl=en_GB&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/JeEqH5ph2EQ&hl=en_GB&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="320" height="265"></embed></object>
    plan it...build it....ride it...love it....
    http://coastkid.blogspot.com/

  87. #1087
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    the swingarm 'pics post above 'came with the original bolt and spacers, can i use it on the super V frame?
    this bolt is lighter buth the spacers are also thinner .

  88. #1088
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfa75
    the swingarm 'pics post above 'came with the original bolt and spacers, can i use it on the super V frame?
    this bolt is lighter buth the spacers are also thinner .
    You can use the new (black) bolt but you must use the original (silver) spacers. Be very careful not to overtighten the black bolt or it will break. Torque to 240 In-Lbs (27 Nm).

  89. #1089
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    You can use the new (black) bolt but you must use the original (silver) spacers. Be very careful not to overtighten the black bolt or it will break. Torque to 240 In-Lbs (27 Nm).
    ok thanks , it works and saved some grams!
    another question:

    things i noticed with the jekyll swingarm, the angle changed of the tube where you mount the front der.(green line) also you can see the tire is closer to the seatpost (red line) . i had to raise my seat!

    Also if i look at your post on your site
    http://forum.tryonbike.com/index.php...3ff&topic=24.0

    my new swingarm should give more tire clearance then a CAAD4 swingarm, but like you can see on the pisc below i fitted a 1.9 tire with no problems but a 2.25 tire rubs a litle bit.
    is this normal? the tire i use has large dots on the sides! maybe with, for example, a Schwalbe racing ralph there is no rubbing .

    also some pics of the 'uber lite' with paint stripped! next step is to paint it BBQ black and
    install a XT crank!
    first impression of this upgrade ( rear disc, more travel, lighter swingarm is very good .

    Also improve the cable routing! for now i mounted the bike to do test riding!



  90. #1090
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    Also, measure the clearance between the frame pivot and the spacers between the swing arm bearings/spacers. If you have too much clearance, say .020-.030, you will be forced to over tighten the bolt to take up the space between the two and you will crack the bolt even with the proper torque. I went through two of them before I got out my calipers and took a measurment. I had to have four Jekyll spacers modified for the correct clearance. Now it fits like a glove and the swing arm moves freely with no binding of the bearings. The thickness for my set-up is .221 +/- .005 for each spacer. I'm assuming it would be close to the same on others.
    '96 Uber Light
    '00 R3000 TT
    '08 Six13

  91. #1091
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    Quote Originally Posted by baalan
    Also, measure the clearance between the frame pivot and the spacers between the swing arm bearings/spacers. If you have too much clearance, say .020-.030, you will be forced to over tighten the bolt to take up the space between the two and you will crack the bolt even with the proper torque. I went through two of them before I got out my calipers and took a measurment. I had to have four Jekyll spacers modified for the correct clearance. Now it fits like a glove and the swing arm moves freely with no binding of the bearings. The thickness for my set-up is .221 +/- .005 for each spacer. I'm assuming it would be close to the same on others.
    i used the original(superV) spacers with the black pivot bolt. i torqued it 27Nm.
    how do you measure it ? if i understand it right you mean that the swingarm is off center because the incorrect spacers?




  92. #1092
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    When you dry fit the swing arm with the spacers, it should ideally slide in without a lot of clearance. To find the dimensions, measure the outside frame pivot (write it down), the swing arm WITH the spacers in placed against the inside of the bearings (measure this). Subtract the total thickness of both spacers(this will give you the distance between the bearings) and subtract the frame pivot from this and divide by two. This will give you the perfect thickness of each spacer. The stock Super's spacers are .208 appx. My measurements came to almost
    .030 undersized. I had a four Jekyll spacers around so I machined .047 off each one to give me the needed .210 for my bike. Now it fits perfect. Before I did this, the swing arm was stiff and didn't move freely because of the side load on the bearings. Your's may be different but if not, you might want to get spacers made or modified if you can. It made a world of difference with mine. I still have two Jekyll spacers left over if you can utilize them.
    '96 Uber Light
    '00 R3000 TT
    '08 Six13

  93. #1093
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    Good job!

    looks great!

    Quote Originally Posted by alfa75
    things i noticed with the jekyll swingarm, the angle changed of the tube where you mount the front der.(green line) also you can see the tire is closer to the seatpost (red line) . i had to raise my seat!
    You should also probably move the seat forward a bit to maintain your location relative to the cranks. The Uber Lite is a bit slacker than your previous setup. Geometry was changed from year to year depending on the forks they were using at the time. We don't have enough information to predict the precise effect for each model.

    Quote Originally Posted by alfa75
    my new swingarm should give more tire clearance then a CAAD4 swingarm, but like you can see on the pisc below i fitted a 1.9 tire with no problems but a 2.25 tire rubs a litle bit.
    is this normal?
    No. I suspect that your wheel is dished to the right.

  94. #1094
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    Quote Originally Posted by rw420
    looks great!


    You should also probably move the seat forward a bit to maintain your location relative to the cranks. The Uber Lite is a bit slacker than your previous setup. Geometry was changed from year to year depending on the forks they were using at the time. We don't have enough information to predict the precise effect for each model.


    No. I suspect that your wheel is dished to the right.
    uber lite a bit slacker? so you mean like slower than before? not agressive?
    i have a feeling that now with the upgrade the bike is much heavier? and not so fast anymore? the headshock much lighter than lefty,V-brakes much lighter than disc, the swingarm( jekyll) is lighter, v-brake wheels much lighter ! did non weighted before and after! don't know......have to do more riding!

    wheel is dished to the right" strange, the wheel is fine on my prophet swingarm!

  95. #1095
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    Another one joins the family

    Here's my Uber Lite that I've got completed enough to ride finally. The rear triangle's been on for just under two months, and now the front fork's here [Thanks Russ!].

    It's a 1998 Medium Super V 400 that I picked up on Craigslist about 14 months ago with the intention of ubering it, and since then I've been picking up parts.

    Here's a before picture:


    Here's the current pic:


    Here's a closeup of the problem solver low stack reducer cups that the bike shop installed:


    And the current fork to frame contact issue (lockout knob on the 2010 Fox 32 Talas 150 does make contact with the downtube because of the no stack reducers, but it's a simple fix:


    Items remaining:
    • I need to figure out where I want the stem, and cut the steerer tube to length

    • I need to install a tall baseplate (+5mm) to prevent the fork to frame contact issues (already ordered)

    • Change out the yellow grips

    • Upgrade the drivetrain

    • Possibly swap out the front triangle for a Med '99 or large '99 and upgrade to a DHX Air to get a full 6" from the rear.


    Thoughts:
    I've only taken it out on a few test rides. But my first impressions are:
    • The upgrade to a platform shock (RP23) and the jekyll rear triangle solved the suspension bobbing that I didn't like with the original design. Before the swap, climbing was a real pain, and the suspension bob really annoyed me, coming from a hardtail. The platform shock allowed me to eliminate 95% of that and still retain travel for the bumps. A great improvement!

    • I went with the Talas 32 RLC 150 for the front. In the 110mm position, the bike feels like it used to, but I now have almost twice the travel. Move it up to the 150mm position, and I notice the increased wheelbase when turning, but the ability to select the length seems at this point to be worth the extra expense since I can dial in the length I expect to need for the conditions. We'll see how it works in practice once Spring arrives. [Thanks to Russ RW420 at Tryon bike for the fork recommendation]

    • Building a bike from parts isn't the cheapest, but it allows you to spread the cost out over a number of months so it really does help with cash flow.

    • Now I'm just jonesing for Winter to be over, for the snow to finish melting and to hit the trails with the new bike.


    It's looking to be a GREAT Year!

  96. #1096
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    My Turn!

    I'm a little late to the Uber party, but hey. I'm mainly a road guy, but couldn't pass up a '96 Super V 3000 several months ago. Enjoyed the sh*te out of the bike. Confidence grew, put some massive 2.3" tires on it, played with tire pressures, bought a newer headshok fork, added a front disc...and that's pretty much the upgrade wall. Really just wanted to find a swingarm for a rear disc, but came up on a sweet (and sorta matching) Caad4 Swingarm. I'm not too intimidated by the tab cutting, and am a 7.5"x2" rear shock away from having everything. I realize the current Super Fatty 80mm fork will be a huge bottle neck and mess up the geometry, but I'm going to hold out for a good deal on a 130-140mm lefty. Keeping the 8 speed stuff, and the Magic Motorcycle cranks/BB

    Here's the McDonalds-edition Uber in the infant stages...


  97. #1097
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    Cip.. I too was looking at just updating my headshok to 80mm with disc, after all the headshok was one of the reasons I bought a SV in the first place. I finally went with a
    Reba 120 and haven't regretted it. But try it like this for a while.

  98. #1098
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cipolini2b
    ... put some massive 2.3" tires on it...
    How did you manage to fit 2.3" tires in either of your original and new CAAD4 swingarms?

    I can barely fit a 2.2" tire in my CAAD4.

  99. #1099
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    They fit pretty well in the original swingarm. WTB Prowler XT. I'm hoping I can get them in the CAAD4, but if not, i'm going to go to panaracers.

  100. #1100
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    I think I royally screwed up my Uber conversion...drilled the holes 7/8 of an inch forward...I thought...seems as though I may have gone 3mm too far. Tried fitting old Fox Vanilla just to check and the end rubs the frame and the holes don't even line up....@$&Q@*#$....since I have to buy a new 7.5" shock anyway, are there any that have less material on the end?

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