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  1. #1
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    no rear traction on climbs-geometry problem?

    I have an 06 F600 and just converted in to SS. I never really climbed out of the saddle before the conversion but now that I have, I noticed some rear wheel slippage. I set my butt back to the point it was behind the seat and my front wheel didn't bobble and I still had trouble with traction. Could this be due to my tire tread or frame size/geometry? I am 5'5" inseam of 28" and a small frame bike. I use hutch pythons and it was quite muddy.

  2. #2
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    CDale hardtails are renown to be moutain goats as far as climbing goes.
    Try other tires , there is an infinity of choice , and don't forget that there will always be a limit to what a tire does.

    PS I use a Continental Survival in the back for xtra muddy situation.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

  3. #3
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    You should keep your weight forward when climbing, just carry more speed into the hill and over muddy sections so you don't have to goose it. You're going to spin more climbing with a monocog because you are using a higher gear then you'd normally want, which requires more effort (torque) per pump.

  4. #4
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    It's easier to have a tire slip out when getting out of the saddle, you usually have less weight on the rear tire when not seated. Try moving you body front to back a bit, doing tests, you'll see the effect it has and may find a position that gives you more grip while still being able to grind up the steep inclines that don't really let you a choice to stand up on a SS.

    With that said, Pythons are not too good in muddy conditions...

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  5. #5
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    Yeah if you haven't really climbed out of the saddle much and you are all of a sudden doing it (in muddy conditions no less), its partly a matter of body location like Dan said. You have to stand and stay back over the rear tire to maintain traction in loose or muddy situations. If you lean out over handlebars, you'll feel comfortable, but your rear tire is just gonna spin out.

  6. #6
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    traction out of the saddle

    I've got an '06 F600, not single speed, but I'm experimenting with riding my favorite trail in higher gears with less shifting (mostly because I'm getting in better shape, but also because I'm trying to complete the loop faster). Anyway, you probably get your best traction with your butt in the saddle but on steep grades, this requires shifting into spinning gears. That's not an option with SS, and in my case, I'm trying to learn to climb in higher gears, and that requires standing on steep grades. In experimenting with this, I find that when I'm tired, I put my weight too far forward and actually lean on the bars. That's when the rear tire gets too little weight and you have traction problems. The trick to climbing when out of the saddle is this: you must be PULLING on your bars with enough weight forward to prevent front tire lift. When you get the feel for this, your rear wheel traction will be at its best because not only will getting out of the saddle help absorb shock on bumpy climbs, but climbing in a stiff gear (instead of spinning) means you will be less likely to overpower the rear wheel and spin out (that's the same principle as climbing a snowy hill in your car...you get better traction when you "lug" the engine in a higher gear instead of climbing in first gear).

    Finally, I agree with the advice given above: maintain a little speed. Speed gives balance and also allows you to roll over wet rocks/roots instead of spinning out. Most importantly, experimentation and saddle time will unlock the secrets better than reading a web page.
    Wisdom is the domain of the Wiz...which is extinct. FZ

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pope
    Most importantly, experimentation and saddle time will unlock the secrets better than reading a web page.
    Good advices, especially the last sentence.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  8. #8
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    If you get out of the saddle to climb, try to keep your butt right at the front point of the saddle. (No sodomy jokes, please.)

    This gives you a good tradeoff between rear tire traction and more leverage on the pedal stroke.

    Of course with singlespeed it's important (as others have pointed out) to get that momentum up. With any kind of climbing you want the pedal stroke to be as smooth as possible to maintain traction.

    I also really like using bars ends with my SS when climbing. I can pull back hard on the bars and keep my weight back, but since my hands are out over the front wheel farther, this helps keep the front wheel down.

    Anywho, that's what works for me.

  9. #9
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    try IRC mythos. Been using them for years, and you can get them cheap too. Spin and hover over your saddle adjusting for the hill

  10. #10
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    a lower center of gravity helps also.

    ie. a smaller bike with a shorter wheelbase will put your center of gravity higher.

  11. #11
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    speaking of IRC Mythos , I was riding those expensive french made Hutchson stuff came OEM on my Dale back in the days ... anyway , those suckers were slipping on anything that was not bone dry , until one day i met a guy and I was *****ing about it , he told me to try the IRC , 15 bucks a piece and almost as light as a road tire.. he also taught me a trick , buy a front but mount it on the rear with the thread reversed , since then I haven't used anything other then the Mythos ! they been in production for over a decade and ppl are still buying them , that should tell you the are still out there not because of bling , but becaue they are good as what a MTB tire should be ..

    If you are looking for something that hooks up on a climb , give it a try , they are only 15 bucks a pop. Good luck

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by phillyGTA
    speaking of IRC Mythos , I was riding those expensive french made Hutchson stuff came OEM on my Dale back in the days ... anyway , those suckers were slipping on anything that was not bone dry , until one day i met a guy and I was *****ing about it , he told me to try the IRC , 15 bucks a piece and almost as light as a road tire.. he also taught me a trick , buy a front but mount it on the rear with the thread reversed , since then I haven't used anything other then the Mythos ! they been in production for over a decade and ppl are still buying them , that should tell you the are still out there not because of bling , but becaue they are good as what a MTB tire should be ..

    If you are looking for something that hooks up on a climb , give it a try , they are only 15 bucks a pop. Good luck

    Yup, same with the Michelin Wildgrippers: the green ones. I even got a set that was for the factory racers for Bianchi back in the day that was experimental. They all sucked! The setup that worked the best was Continental Competition Pro 2.1 in the front, and IRC Mythos 1.9 in the rear for cross country. My bike just railed through pretty much everything!

  13. #13
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    traction, Jackson

    Also try less air pressure. I like 'em as flat as they'll go without hearing a "rim shot" when I'm sitting down over rocks.
    Wisdom is the domain of the Wiz...which is extinct. FZ

  14. #14
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    Everyone slips in muddy conditions . . . like others have said - try a different tire, adjust your spin, etc. Don't forget about tire pressure, lots of folk run high pressures and then slip all over the trail. It's OK to run lower pressure to help with traction. Also, take a page from the single speed playbook, get your speed up and work to maintain momentum on the climbs.

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