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  1. #1
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    New question here. New Cannondale MTB, upgrades?

    I am getting my F4 Cannondale 2010 built, M size. Will pick it up on Fri.
    Will do some casual riding before taking it on the trail

    What are some of the minor upgrade I should make to make?
    Suggest brand/model too.

    Looking to small changes without breaking the bank, cos I know that deraillers, rims, etc can run up to $300-500

    I was thinking
    -Front derailleur to either Deore or SLX which is a $20-50 upgrade
    -Grips (no idea what to get)
    -Handle bar (no idea what to get)
    -Pedals (no idea what to get)
    -Looking for good and reasonable gloves and helmet too, any suggestions?


  2. #2
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    I wouldn't upgrade anything until you get out and ride the bike first. Perhaps after a few months (or at least a few weeks!), it'll become obvious what parts you want to upgrade--and why. For example, you may decide that you want a lighter bike, which might mean starting with lighter tires. Or you might hate the factory grips, at which point you may have a better idea of the features you want in new grips. You may find that the front derailleur and handlebars work just fine, and you'll be glad that you have money to put toward something like a saddle that fits you better.

    In other words, let experience be your guide. And you'll only gain experience by getting out and riding what you have!

  3. #3
    LA CHÈVRE
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    I'm with Toby. If you have no idea what and why to upgrade, don't upgrade. Keep it stock to start unless something doesn't fit you at all. As you ride it, you'll find if things are not to your tastes and fit. Pedals could be a good thing if you want to go with clipless... then you would also need cycling shoes.

    Gloves and riding shorts are a good idea though, a helmet is a must. All helmets sold have passed tests so it's down to styling, weight, air flow and price but you can't go wrong really. These are things I would suggest to check in the store, making sure they fit you and are comfortable.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  4. #4
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    I agree with the others.

    Ride the snot out of that thing. Replace parts as they wear out or break. Replace parts that don't work for you/the way you ride. ie.. brakes might not be strong enough, crank arms flex, etc...

    But ride the bike first, so you have an idea what works and what doesn't.

  5. #5
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    As others have said, ride it for a while and then change what you don't like. Spend your money on gear first. After that, I would buy a suspension pump and play with the pressure in the fork. The tires are also an integral part of the suspension, change the pressures and see what works for you and your style of riding.

    A work stand makes derailer adjustments, tire changes, component swaps, etc. much easier. It will pay for itself in no time, and you will know your bike inside and out.

    Post pics when you get it.

  6. #6
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    New pedals are the only thing I'd do right away. I suggest any Time Atac style pedal. They are easy for those that have never used clipless pedals. Other than that I'd say buy shorts, gloves and a helmet.

    Gloves are more or less disposable. Just get what you think looks good. A helmet is something you need to get your hands on and see what you like. Don't skimp on a cheap helmet.

  7. #7
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    Get a good helment and gloves and some spd peddles. Just ride until you break stuff. Then replace stuff you break

  8. #8
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    max is what you can upgrade - it's pedals and perhaps tires... You can always put it on the other bike. Don't spend your money on the other stuff.

  9. #9
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    Big Thanks to all, i will take your advise by ridding it first.

    I know i am going to get a good helmet, might use my workout gloves first, as for pedals - i think I will remove the strap and have a go at it.

    Will cycle it to work as a commuter to get the hang of the bike

    Things I thought about changing is the front Derailleur as I can get a Deore for $27 but I am not sure if I will see an improvement.

    Thought about changing tires/rims for road but that would be $xxx for a decent set.

    Been reading this too about Seat post

  10. #10
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    Skewe,

    You do not need a new front derailleur. The one that came with your bike will probably last you thousands of miles unless you smash it into a rock or leave it out in the rain or snow all year. A Deore or SRAM XX, at any cost, won't improve your experience one little bit. Zippo. Really, trust me!

    You also do not need a new seatpost. You'll not notice the difference between the cheapest and most expensive seatpost on the market until you are a very experienced rider--if even then!

    Do buy yourself a pair or two of cycling shorts. Those, you'll notice! Good to hear that you are getting a safe helmet--you'll certainly need it if you ride hard enough! Get some chain lube too. Lastly, cross tires might make commuting more enjoyable, depending on what you've already got on the bike. Some tires buzz more than others on pavement, so see if your current tires bother you before changing anything.

    Just get out there and enjoy your bike already--and save the bling for when you become a strong and capable rider--at which point you'll figure out what really matters).

  11. #11
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    Thanks todd.

    The reason I was looking at the doere on amazon is due to the fact that the whole bike is running deore all around from shifters to the rear. Not sure why they have alevo in the front.

    The existing tires are kendals off roads. Is it a good idea to get a spare rim/set for slicks-road tires. Looking at rims/disc rotors, tires, etc. It is easier to swap tires/rim sets than to have a tire removed from the rims based on riding conditions. Don't think I can't cough out 100-300 at the moment though.

    Noted about helmet, pants.

  12. #12
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    You kinda sound like my friend who is a MTB noob and just bought an F5. He keeps asking me what he should upgrade after having owned it a week, my response (other than saying things like buy shorts, gloves, a good helmet, mayyyybe clipless pedals if he wants to try them) has been "If you don't know how a new part will affect your ride, don't buy it."

    Seriously, just ride the damn thing. The focus of your ride should be the ride itself, not the tool. Unless you're racing and need the lightest thing possible at any expense, your bike is a fine bike. There are no crappy parts on it. If you go upgrading things like seat posts you will just be throwing money away. The best upgrade you could make in terms of weight would be a new lighter wheel/tire combo, but would it be worth the $$? Probably not.

    I will say that when I rode my bike ('09 F4) enough to realize that I might want to convert it to 1x9, when I started the conversion I took advantage of some sales and bought an SLX crank, and a SRAM X-9 shifter/rear derailleur.

    The crank, I "think" feels stiffer, but honestly I don't freaking know. It wasn't life-altering. I do dig my shifter setup, because it gives a nice quick and crisp response, but it's not like it was THAT much quicker.

  13. #13
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    Thanks Jared. Going to take ur suggestion and other suggestion.

    Been looking for a helmet in the mean time..

  14. #14
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    Oh I didn't mean to sound ******y btw

  15. #15
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    Wow.

    I can't believe the posts in this thread. Skewe asked for some possible upgrades for the new ride and everybody says just ride it, it's fine.
    I don't think he is looking for helmet and gear recommodations.

    So, do you naysayers ride a stock bike? I doubt it. There's nothing wrong with someone wanting to upgrade their ride.

    I say mod it up, and make it your own. I have most of the stock component weights documented so you can make an informed decision. F4 build







    Ride on, Greg
    Last edited by Carbon 66; 10-15-2010 at 03:15 AM.

  16. #16
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    We're all for doing upgrades. Our point is that if you don't know what and why to upgrade, wait until you have the experience to know what and why change parts. When someone doesn't seem to know what to do and suggests an upgrade to a SLX front derailleur, you know he doesn't have much knowledge about bike parts and their benefits. There is no shame in learning, then when skewe posts back and says he doesn't like this and that for this and that reason, he'll get a lot of suggestions.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  17. #17
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    I recently upgraded the bars on my Rize. Performance bike has their Forte brand of carbon bars that are light, cost effective especially when on sale, and have received consistently great reviews. I don't have exact numbers but just by feel, the difference is very easily noticeable. Very good bang for the buck, has some coolness factor, and takes a little more vibration out of the ride.

    I've been keeping my eye out for a carbon seatpost as well. Hoping for similar results.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbon 66
    Wow.

    I can't believe the posts in this thread. Skewe asked for some possible upgrades for the new ride and everybody says just ride it, it's fine.
    I don't think he is looking for helmet and gear recommodations.

    So, do you naysayers ride a stock bike? I doubt it. There's nothing wrong with someone wanting to upgrade their ride.

    I say mod it up, and make it your own. I have most of the stock component weights documented so you can make an informed decision. F4 build


    Ride on, Greg

    I was actually dumbfounded by your own thread but bit my tongue, as I personally would have just took allllll that money and bought a better bike to begin with. To each his own I suppose. But yes,my point was to learn before spending money so one's money isn't wasted needlessly.

  19. #19
    Genius
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbon 66
    Wow.

    I can't believe the posts in this thread. Skewe asked for some possible upgrades for the new ride and everybody says just ride it, it's fine.
    I don't think he is looking for helmet and gear recommodations.

    So, do you naysayers ride a stock bike? I doubt it. There's nothing wrong with someone wanting to upgrade their ride.

    I say mod it up, and make it your own. I have most of the stock component weights documented so you can make an informed decision. F4 build



    Ride on, Greg
    I say you fail there Carbon 66.

    OP is getting pretty sound advice. Ride the bike, change things as they break, wear out, or just annoy you. I bought my bike stock, just average components and planned to upgrade as I broke things.

    Now 2-3 years later, its been through

    3 rear derailleurs
    Rebuilt Lefty
    3-4 chains
    XTR pedals
    FSA bottom bracket
    Elixir brakes
    Hand built rear wheel
    Tubeless conversion
    Grips (today)
    and probably a few others i dont recall at the moment.

    Like you OP, I figured the LX front derailleur was gonna cause me the most trouble and considered an immediate upgrade. As it turns out, what I thought was the weakest link turned out to outlast all the others and still works great.

    .
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  20. #20
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    I think Carbon66's bike is quite a nice setup for a hard tail

    He could have gone for a stumpy but that starts @ $1800 if he likes specialized but they have Fox forks. He might have invested about $800-1k in upgrades at the moment +/-, depending on what he paid for the bike. I paid less than $800. A F3 or F2 looks menacing but i heard that if the fork gives out, your are SOL.

    End of day, he enjoys upgrading and tinkering

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9
    Like you OP, I figured the LX front derailleur was gonna cause me the most trouble and considered an immediate upgrade. As it turns out, what I though was the weakest link turned out to outlast all the others and still works great.

    .
    That is good to know about your experience about the LX front.

    The current front derailleur is an Alivo.

  22. #22
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    If upgrading makes you happy, then do it. It's all about having fun and being fit.

    Financially, upgrading parts is a waste of money unless you are racing. Just replace what breaks or you don't like, but mentally new or better parts might make you feel better overall.

    You will get the most performance benefit from a higher level of fitness and skill.

    For me a GPS like the Garmin Edge I cannot live without as well as clothing that will allow me to ride year round in New England.

    Have Fun!!!
    12 Scalpel 2
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    09 Rize 3 - Retired
    11 EMD 9 - Retired

  23. #23
    Ridin' dirty!
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    Quote Originally Posted by skewe
    That is good to know about your experience about the LX front.

    The current front derailleur is an Alivo.
    That would be the first thing I get rid of....1 accidental cross shift and that thing is toast....
    I then would upgrade what makes riding your bike more enjoyable:

    -Front dérailleur,
    -Tubes and tires,
    -Better/more comfortable seat and handlebar grips,
    -Better brake levers and cable housings,
    -Bigger rotor in the front.

    I would only consider major upgrades like wheels, fork rear dérailleur etc. after your stock components break.

    Now go and ride that darn thing!
    "Common sense isn't always that common!"
    Custom Prophet and Custom "Leftified" Delta V

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