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  1. #1
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    New to Cannondale, bought a Rush Carbon 2

    I needed a new bike and I found a nice Rush Carbon 2. I did change the seatpost and seat from my old bike. I am looking for opinions, tips, and tricks to learn about the bike, fork, and rear shock. Thanks for all the help. p.s. fruita, colorado is a good time
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New to Cannondale, bought a Rush Carbon 2-dscn0377.jpg  

    New to Cannondale, bought a Rush Carbon 2-dscn0378.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Right now I'm on the tail end of my ownership of my Rush. I love the bike and always will, but unfortunately I have to sell it to help offset the cost of the Flash 29er I just bought. Here are a few of the bigger things that I have come up with about the Rush and my experience.

    Suspension: Because the Rush is a single pivot, the suspension may feel different than a more active suspension that you may have ridden in the past. Many other systems (like Giant's Maestro) are way too active and made me want to run the pressure of the shock very high for my body weight to stiffen up the suspension. I have never had this issue with my Rush.

    On your first few rides make sure to bring a shock pump on the trails so you can tune the ride to what feels best while you are riding. Once you set it write down or remember your pressure in the fork and in the shock and make sure to keep the pressure up.

    At least annually, I did it bi-annually, you should have someone look at the lefty and make sure that everything is kosher and is working properly. This will keep the lefty from having more ware than it should. These smaller costs to keep the lefty in good working order now could save you down the road if you hadnt been doing routine maintenance.

    Tires: Run them tubeless. Tubeless is not only going to cut weight, but it will IMO vastly improve the ride quality. Your tires are the first bart of the bike that touches the rough terrain that you are riding on, why not make the ride a little more comfortable. Tubeless allows you to run lower pressure and really tune the ride of the bike because even 2 psi can change the way the bike responds to cornering and accelerates. If you can figure out the pressure that makes you feel the best on your bike, you have found the optimum pressure. After you have found the right pressure for you, make sure you ride with it every time.

    Maintenance:

    It probably is not something that a lot of people do, but I got in the habit to every few months taking the rear suspension off and checking the bearings and all the hardware for any signs of wear. While I had them off I always cleaned the interface between the rear suspension linkage and the main frame.

    Another good place to check is the headset bearings. Since the bearings are pressed directly into the frame of yours, you should probably check them a little more often than I did. If they go unaccounted for and they rust or corrode they will be very difficult to get out of the frame.

    Another thing to check is bolt torque. If you dont have a good torque wrench, take it to the LBS every once in a while and have them check the torque on most of the bolts. This is especially important because you have a carbon bike. At the bare minimum check the seat post clamp, the stem, the lefty steerer tube bolts, hub, the centerlock rotors and anything else that lists a recommended torque setting.

    Other: I would pay a visit to your local bike fitter and have him look at you. A good bike fit is the best upgrade that you will ever have. He will be able to make your bike feel like it was custom drawn for your body. It's a great thing to do. Another plus is that you can take the measurements from your fit and apply them to any bike you buy down the road!

    Now all you have to do is get out and ride it!

  3. #3
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    Geeze.. what are you a bike salesman??? Oh wait....

    Good advice, heck I've had my prophet for a season now, and I think I'm going to toss my shock pump in my back pack for my next ride. I've never really thought about how dialed I can get the bike with this method...
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini6
    Geeze.. what are you a bike salesman??? Oh wait....
    You got it

  5. #5
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    thanks for the input. I do bring my pump on my rides for so i can tune as i ride . the lefty is very supple and it plunged through the travel quite easily so i had to slow down the compression some. also i do run tubeless and i need to add some psi to the rear tire. it seems to squirm at speed.

  6. #6
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    I put a PUSH modified rear shock on mine to make the rear more active and use the full travel potential. I did not like the XC race stiffness of the stock shock and the hard end of the stroke. Made the bike more stable on the fast rocky/rooty down hills and easier on my rear end for XXC and ultra events. Overall very good bike and comfortable. I did put a massive rock into the down tube and had to retire it. An aluminum frame would not have made it either.

    Tension on the BB30 is important. Too tight you get drag and too loose it sounds like a coffee grinder. Had to use blue loctite on the bearing compression nut to keep it from loosening as well as on every other nut and bolt. Check your single pivot nut as well.

  7. #7
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    any ideas for downtube protection, or setup advice on the forks and shock. thanks

  8. #8
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    As far as travel goes. I am a plush guy and want to use all the travel available. I set the pretension on the lefty you have on the soft side and then right or wrong use the compression dial to stiffen or soften the ride based on conditions. I only use the lock out on the lefty for fire and paved road climbs. I changed the rear pressure based on the trail. If I do not use all the travel during the ride I feel cheated. I set the propedal on the soft side and only switched out of it for sustained downhills. You have a nice bike there andit can take some abuse.

    As far as down tube protection goes I would love to hear from some folks as well. You can not stop massive rocks popping up and stopping the blount force trauma but could you wrap a milk carton around the bottom 12 inches to protect against the sharp edges of rock strikes?

  9. #9
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    remember to put some protection tape between the cables and frame. Other than that, congrats on a killer purchase. I own one myself and it is a spectacularly good frame.

    happy trails

  10. #10
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    i like the bike and the spec it came with although the bike shop told me it is a 2009 and I think it is a 2008 which i did not like. fully loaded and with my weakness, carbon fiber! i think i paid to much (3500usd) but i don't mind because of the components and what it came with, so i am satisfied.

  11. #11
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    it's def a 08. Dunno if the dealer should've given you a better price or what, but it is still a great bike with great specs. And please remember to protect the frame from cable rub. Several people have not paid the proper attention and as a result now have holes in their frames in a less than ideal spot - over the bb on the downtube. And no, cable rub is not covered under the warrenty

  12. #12
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    i did put the protective tape anywhere that i could see cable rub. Also the rear chainstay protector is hideous, any ideas on a replacement or a differnet method of protection.

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