Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84

    My 2011 Jekyll saga begins

    Ok, the bad news first. My Jekyll build today did not go quite to plan. My shop did not have the 73mm adapter that would enable to me install my Chris King BB and XX Cranks. Also, Chris King does not have the axle kit I need to convert QR wheels so they can be installed on my Jekyll. My King Hub/Stan's 355 rim/Racing Ralph Evo/XX11-36 cassette wheels will be much lighter than the stock setup (Black Flag Experts/Nobby Nic Snake Skin Tires/Shimano 11-36 cassette). I also do not have my carbon riser-bar and seat-post yet. If my math is right my wheels are about 200g lighter than stock, my tires are 260g lighter, my crank set up will be 130g lighter, my seat-post and bars are 250g lighter...which is a grand total of 840g, or 1.85lbs. now I did not weight just the frame, or just the frame and shock. I had planned on it but, as I tore into the build, I decided to just build it up. I know the weight of my Genius with the exact same parts, so that will be good enough for me.

    No the interesting news, I thought the bike came with FSA Afterburner BB30's but it actually came with SRAM AKA 3x10 cranks. They are 890g, only 50g more than the Afterburners. The wheels are surprisingly light and seem like a good wheelset for anyone not wanting to go uber light. They are 1725, respectable for xc/am wheels.

    Now the good news, considering I have not yet ridden the bike (except in the parking lot as I tuned in the shifting and sag). The bike weighed in at 27.7 (edited from 26.7 that I originally posted, as a typo), as you see it below. As I said I should be taking another 840g out of it when I get the rest of my parts on it. That means it should come in at 24.85lbs. This puts is within .10lbs of my Genius 10. Impressive when I see the two next to each other. The Jekyll is FAR beefier, every tube is larger, the pivots are larger, the front end is MUCH larger, etc. I can also say that off curbs and over large speed bumps the damping is wonderful. This is what always lacked on the Genius. When I went from the Genius to a Remedy for a test ride I was stunned at the damping on it, and how plush and settled it felt. Well the Jekyll gives me a similar feel. Now I plan on putting it through it spaces this weekend, and will report back.

    I will report back more after a ride or 3. And yes, I will take better pictures too.

    Siting on the stand under construction


    Temporarily complete.....until I can add the rest of my parts.


    Paint looks much better in person.


    White hubs and white key spokes, very cool for stock stuff.


    XX Rear Der


    Best Brakes around, Billet Hope's.


    Rear Brakes, better shot of the machined billet brakes.
    Last edited by Duc Hunter; 03-01-2011 at 07:32 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: XgreygOOse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    359
    Looking good.
    Lucky you, at lease you have the complete bike. Me on the other hand have all my parts, but no bike !! Mid to late March for mine. Been waiting since last Oct. Think I I'll start a tread soon, help with long painful wait

    I am too aiming for mid 24lbs which shouldn't be to hard if I plan not to use the Reverb post. BTW what tire size are you using?
    Cannondale: Team Scalpel, Flash Ultimate, Hooligan 9
    Lynskey Pro26 with custom Lefty head tube
    Santa Cruz Nomad carbon

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84
    The stock setup is 2.4 Nobby Nic EVO Snake Skins front and rear. My lighter setup is Racing Ralph EVO's, 2.4 front and 2.25 rear. I will alternate depending on terrain etc. Based on what I am swing mid 24 will be tough in a large, high 24's to low 25's won't be.

  4. #4
    26er
    Reputation: smilycook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,976
    I have the black flag pros on my 1 and I have been very surprised at how light they are and how well built they seem, in the end only time will tell. I had a set of chris kings wheels that I sold since they were not compatible with the thru axles and have to say I am not missing them yet. A dropper seat post is mighty nice on these bikes and is worth the weight penalty.

    Nice looking black, looks very similar to the ultimate. It is nice they did not give you white grips.
    Live to ride!

    Cannondale Jekyll Carbon 1
    Cannondale Trigger Carbon 2
    Transition Bottle Rocket
    Niner MCR 29er Hardtail

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerboyj17's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    454
    Couldn't you put the XX cassette from the other wheelset on the black flag wheels that are on the bike now to save some weight?

    Nice bike!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: scoutcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,991
    did you buy just the frame? what was the price?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kneejerk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    126
    Interesting comments on the comparo between Jekyll, Remedy and Genius. Yes, the Trek stuff is very good these days.

    I'm curious how the Jekyll / Genius "pull" shocks compare in function. I imagine any configuration could be made to work with the proper efforts (engineering).

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    422
    Just a matter of changing the side the air spring acts against. not quite as simple as saying it, but the concept is easy enough.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    406
    Is that weight including pedals?

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kneejerk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    126
    Quote Originally Posted by ratmonkey
    Just a matter of changing the side the air spring acts against. not quite as simple as saying it, but the concept is easy enough.
    Yes, but when reversed there is no longer progression in the air chamber. It becomes digression, or does it?..... I guess, they couldn't do that!.... otherwise it wouldn't work. Hum, too early for my brain!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84
    Bikerboyj17 - To answer some questions…..I could put the XX cassette on etc. and save a little weight, but I am not sure it would be noticed much. I am waiting to change the majority of parts to get a good idea of what the stock bike feels like and how much my nicer parts help.

    Scoutcat – I bought a complete Jekyll 2. Frames wont be available for a LONG time. I hear that if you order a carbon Jekyll today you wont get it to June/July. I also hear that if you order an aluminum Jekyll, even though I don’t think they have shipped any yet, you wont get it until August now. The 2012’s are to be shown to dealers at Cannondale’s summer event in June I think. Wow!

    Kneejerk – I can say the genius was a great bike, I loved it. That said the Fox Shock is far better than the DT was, especially in the damping department. There is a lot more air volume and oil volume. There is also more room for better dampening circuits. I also think Fox can leverage they class leading experience. Kneejerk, look at the exploded pics of the shock on the internet. It will show you how the shocks air and dampening works in every mode.

    Motoadve – The weight is with pedals. Now note I changed the weight. I made a typo when I said it was 26.7 mostly stock. It was really 27.7 (edited above). Remember al I changes was the brakes, shifters, rear der, and removed the tubes in place of Stan’s fluid. That does not change much of the weight really. My guess is totally stock it was 28lbs with pedals and a carbon bottle cage.
    Last edited by Duc Hunter; 03-01-2011 at 08:26 AM.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84
    How does it ride? – Short Version
    For those who don’t want to read a lot here is the Readers Digest Version….after a 4+ hour ride over very varied terrain I have a good basis for an opinion.

    In Flow mode it goes downhill like a purpose built bike like a Remedy etc. The rear damping is light years ahead of the Genius, the bike just feel plush and settled over everything. On flats and climbing it does just fine, no bob and does not feel sluggish (like a Remedy does). The only reason on flats and all but the steepest climbs the only reason I found myself switching to Elevate Mode was because my brain was getting the best of me, I would switch and feel no real increase in efficiency, just a stiffer ride, and switch back. On steep climbs lowering the fork helps the front wheel stay planted, though it is more planted than the Genius was. On even steeper climbs Flow Mod has the rear end sagged too low, and often on these steep sections you mash bad to get up, and this causes ANY suspension to bob a little. Cornering this bike is on rails. In quick switchbacks it just goes, and on faster flowy sections, the same thing. Having ridden sport bikes on a road course I know front end confidence is paramount for fast riding. This bike is very confidence inspiring on all terrains.

    In Elevate Mode the rear end gets stiffed up a lot. It climbs like a mtn goat (as good or better than my Genius did). In EM with the fork in 120mm mode the bike feels like a quick 4” bike with great platform. Even out of the saddle, it just accelerates. The handling sharpens up as well. It is not slow in Flow Mode, but it sure sharpens substantially in EM without becoming twitchy at all. The only time EM gets…challenged is downhill. Obviously this is not the place you would use it but, if you do, the rear is to stiff and chatters as things get bumpy etc. Let’s face it though, a Scalpel does not descend well compared to bikes with longer travel and more plush suspension, the Jekyll in EM is similar.

    All in all this is a great all around bike. It will do rough, true All Mountain stuff wonderfully. It will also climb and do true cross country without giving up much at al to bikes like a Scalpel, Top Fuel, or Fuel EX. Most bikes in its class (Remedy comes to mind) will get left in the dust in flat terrain or on climbs by those bikes. The Jekyll with stay very close to them, and absolutely drop them like a bad habit as soon as things go downhill at all. To me this is the ultimate go everywhere bike. IT improves on the Genius’ bad habits without loosing what it did very well.

    For the rest of you who want more detail……

    Build Update
    For my first round of testing I was only able to swap the brakes out for my Hope’s, the rear der for my XX, the shifters for my XX, and lose the tubes to make the stock wheels/tires tubeless. This does not really remove much weight from stock. I also am re-trying some Ergon grips with carbon bar ends, heavy but comfy. We will see if they stay though. So my bike, with Stainless older eggbeater pedals weighs 27.6 (corrected my first post). Not bad considering.

    I have the 135x12 axle conversion on the way for my King Rear Hub and am waiting on the 73mm bottom bracket adapter that will enable me to install my King BB and XX Cranks. I am also waiting on a Thompson stem to install my Easton EC90SL bars. Lastly, I bit the bullet at went with a Reverb, I was going to get a carbon post and then deal with a Reverb later, but chose to not waist the money on 2 expensive posts. I also have a carbon Tundra coming, though I seemed to enjoy the Gobi a lot (see below).

    Initial Ride Setup
    I chose to start with the suggested air pressures for the fork and shock, based on my weight. I have a lot of motorcycle experience and should have known to check the sag to set the air pressures properly (ALWAYS DO THIS), but I did not. This meant, for my 210lbs “fresh out of the shower,” 100lbs in the fork and 389lbs in the shock. I also set the rebound at the factory recommended settings, 6 for the fork and 4 for the shock. I also went with 28lbs in the ft tire and 32 in the rear. Normally I run my Racing Ralph Evo’s with less pressure, but thought this was a good starting point for the heavier, SnakeSkin equipped stock Nobby Nic’s.

    San Felasco Trails
    Since I am in Florida this is a very cross country ride. Don’t be fooled though, this part of Florida has some hills and, though they are not long they can be steep/or steady, some are loose while some are rocky with roots and switchbacks. Most of the place is dirt and rock, but there is a whole section that is sugar sand, and there are some water crossings. Felasco is mostly single-track too. There is even a long’ish descent that I can go over 30mphBottom-line, it is a very nice set of varied terrain. It gave me a very good idea of how the bike would ride on any terrain, other than mud as it was not raining.

    Initial Ride Report – Day 1
    So I went to a fun place with varied terrain to test the bike out. Most initial rides you stop often to make adjustments, etc. Also, since you are getting to know a new bike, you often don’t do an epic for your initial ride. I went 7.5 miles in, made a few adjustments, continued on, and chose to turn around to head back to my truck at mile 15. In the end my initial ride was 27 miles, 4hrs in the saddle. That should say everything about how this bike rides, to me. The last time I did a 2.5hr+ ride on either a road bike or a mtn bike was SixGAP in September, and on a mtn bike was probably August. I can say the Gobi seems to agree with my butt, since the first time I rode one I spent 4 hours on it. I was coming off the Tundra on the Genius., which I also found comfy.

    At the 7.5 mile mark I lowered the air pressure in the fork to 90 (1 step down on the air pressure chart) and similarly lowered the shock 1 step. The bike felt great in the rear in Flow mode initially, as did the fork. In Elevate Mode though it was very stiff, and I wanted to see if lowering the pressure helped without making the bike wallow in Flow Mode. I also took some pressure out of the front tire. Again the bike railed but I wanted to see how this changed things. The bike became plusher, but did not wallow at all! In Flow Mode (FM) it is wonderful. I used this mode 95% of the time. It corners amazingly, whether on fast sections or in tight single-track. Elevate Mode (EM) makes the rear stiffer, and makes the bike accelerate better, but I have this bike to be comfy, so unless I NEED that extra oomph, or need to get up a steep section where I need less rear sage, I don’t use it much. I did the same thing on the Genius, and on both bikes have found that having the ability to change the bikes mode is used like an adjustable seat post is in reverse. I stay in FM most of the time but flip to EM here and there for that little extra for fun, the right back, just as I leave a seat post up most of the time, and lower it on down hills for that little extra speed, only to pop it right back up as soon as the trail gets less steep.

    By the end of this day my body was whooped! As I got tired, very tired, I started using EM more and more. It was more my brain thinking I needed every bit of help in efficiency to get me home. I was also so pleased that I just kept wanting to ride more and more, to exhaustion.

    Adjustments and issues before Day 2
    I chose to set the sag correctly….at least in the fork. Fox says 23mm of sag is “Cross Country” and 38mm is “All Mountain” for our forks. To get 30mm of sag I had to drop the air pressure from the recommended 100lbs to 80 lbs. This seems strange to me. Now I am using the Scott pump, which lets you close off the valve before removing it from the shock/fork. This means almost no air is lost from the shock as you remove the pump, where as most pumps loose a fair bit of air. Maybe Fox/Cannondale plan for that in their recommended settings? I doubt it but maybe.

    Now for my one big annoyance with the bike. Cannondale does not give us the sag meter they built for our bikes, so there is no easy way to measure sag. They build one, and our frame have the mark for them, but they do not give them to us civilians

    From Bike Rumor Article found here

    This little guy is the sag and travel indicator. Production bikes will have a decal or imprint that shows percentage markers, and the little tab on the frame pushes the gold bit clockwise as the rear end compresses, showing you how much travel you’re getting. Weight weenies, don’t sweat: It’s removable.


    Since I was 2 steps down on the fork from where Fox says I should be I went 2 steps down on the shock. I figured it I was off the bike would not feel balanced. So even though I am 210, the bike is now setup for a 190-199lbs rider in the rear and a 170-185lb rider in the front. I left it this way for day 2. WE NEED TO GET CANNONDALE TO GIVE US THIS FOR PROPER REAR SUSPENSION SETUP!

    Day 2
    For day 2 I stuck closer to home, and just wanted to try something on a local trail that I know very well, that is mostly sand, VERY technical, VERY rooty, VERY tight. My fastest lap around the south trail has been 26 minutes. I was tired from the previous days 27 mile epic, but pushed hard. As this trail is rooty and mostly flat I left the bike in FM. My time was just over 27 minutes, amazing. The front end was so planted I was going into corners faster and faster. I could actually push to where I could hear the front tire starting to give up (you can hear it before you feel it if you can calm enough on the bike to notice). The ride was as amazing as the day before, and even with the much softer suspension FM never felt wallowy.

    What’s Next
    I hope to get he stuff to put the rest of my parts on this week. I will re-weigh the bike then. I was hoping I would take almost 2lbs out of the bike with it, but that was with a carbon seat-post. Now that I have chosen to throw a Reverb on that will reduce my weight loss by about 300g. I hope to head back to Felasco with the new parts to enjoy another epic ride.

    Please ask questions if you have any. I took more pics on the rides, let me know if anyone wants me to post them.


    Wanted to add... the front end with the 1.5" steer tube and HUGE down tube and top tube is stiff. The large pivots are also stiff. These all help the bike track well, be very maneuverable, and confidence inspiring. I never notice that my Genius, or most any bike I have ridden, had play in the rear of the swingarm. The 135x12 rear though ties the Jekyls rear end together amazingly well. I really think this is gong to be an overlooked, but critical reason why the bike it so nice int eh corners. I will say though I have to drop my rear der to take the wheel out, I cannot get my XX upper pulley around the cassette otherwise. My advice, take off the rear der every-time you remove the wheel (just take the bolt off, leave the cables etc, so there are no setup issues).
    Last edited by Duc Hunter; 03-01-2011 at 08:20 AM.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,828
    This meant, for my 210lbs “fresh out of the shower,” 100lbs in the fork and 389lbs in the shock
    Did I read that right? almost 400psi in the rear shock?
    "I'm the fastest of the slow guys"

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by terrible
    Did I read that right? almost 400psi in the rear shock?
    Yo sure did. Here is the sticker on the frame with the pressures. Left column is the rider weight, middle column is the positive and negative chamber pressures, and the right column is the rebound settings.


    By the way I heard a rumor that they are redesigning the sag meter I noted above and when they are available we will be able to get them. YAY!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: terrible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,828
    Wow that's alot of pressure. I'm not sure my little fox pump would do that. Is it such high pressure do to the shock setup being reversed? a pull shock thing?
    "I'm the fastest of the slow guys"

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by terrible
    Wow that's a lot of pressure. I'm not sure my little fox pump would do that. Is it such high pressure do to the shock setup being reversed? a pull shock thing?
    They give you a new Fox/Cannondale pump with the bike. Most pull shock I have see are high pressure, but I am not sure if all have to be. I will say the pressure in this (and the Genius for that matter) did not mean it was a harsh ride. This bike is SUPER plush, and hold its air pressure just fine. What's interesting to me is that they list setting up to a 249lbs rider. Most bikes do not go that high. The Genius shocks max pressure only supported a 210lb rider. Very nice of Cannondale to think of Clydesdales.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5

    bars

    Do you know what the weight of the stock handlebars is? I'm looking to change mine out and can't determine if I'm gaining or losing weight.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84
    I sure do. Ironically I weighed both my stock bars and stock Cannondale C2 400mm seat-post. The seat-post was 311g, and the bars were 254g. I swapped the bars today for Easton EC70 (40mm rise), which weigh 151g. Weight savings of 103g, they are slightly wider (maybe 10mm), and their finish looks like they were built for the Jekyll 2. Very burly flat carbon look. I have been looking for a lighter seat-post, and think the Fizik carbon post is about the best we can do for a light, carbon post. Remember I need a 400mm post.

  20. #20
    26er
    Reputation: smilycook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,976
    Wow you guys are dedicated to those grams. Looks like the bar on the 1 is 136g, but I just looked it up.

    I though you were going to put a Reverb on your 2. It is an amazing addition to this bike.
    Live to ride!

    Cannondale Jekyll Carbon 1
    Cannondale Trigger Carbon 2
    Transition Bottle Rocket
    Niner MCR 29er Hardtail

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by smilycook
    Wow you guys are dedicated to those grams. Looks like the bar on the 1 is 136g, but I just looked it up. I though you were going to put a Reverb on your 2. It is an amazing addition to this bike.
    I have a Reverb on it now. I will be trying it tomorrow. While I want a light bike, but am not squeezing every gram out. Where I am in Florida, I may choose to only run the Reverb when I head out of state, and save the 310g by replacing it with my Easton EC90SL Carbon post.....which just so happens to match my Easton EC70 40mm riser bars. They look like they were built purposefully to match my flat Jekyll, as they are flat unidirectional carbon finish. So "stealth". I will take some more pics tomorrow.

    Back to the weight topic my "Mountain Trip" setup may be stock wheels, stock Nobby Nic Snakeskins and Reverb post, while my Florida setup may be my King Hub/Stan's 355 wheels, Racing Ralph Evo tires & Easton Carbon post. The semi scary thing is the weight difference in these two setups is only 830g, 520 of which is the wheels. I do wonder if the extra 520g of rotating weight will be really noticeable climbing. Wont really know until King gets me my rear axle conversion, so I can get my light weight wheels on the bike and see the difference.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    163

    Doc....any updates

    Any updated pics of the finished bike?
    Thoughts on the bike now that you got some miles under it?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •