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  1. #1
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    Lefty PBR Behaviour Question

    I've got a 2011 Alu PBR Lefty and just did a bearing reset. No probs there. It did not neccesarily need it, I just wanted to see how it was done (I've ridden about 12 hours on it). Anyway, went to test the lockout and it works, sometimes. If i push down SLOWLY on the bars, it does not lock. If I rapidly push, it locks. Is this normal? Is this the blowout? I've got the psi right and when I push down on the bars, I am giving it the same force regardless of how quickly I do it.

  2. #2
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by adambikes
    Is this normal? Is this the blowout?
    Yep, all good.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  3. #3
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    So, basically, the Lefty acts like a seatbelt (when locked). If you move slowly, it will compress. But, if you hit quickly, it will lock (anywhere in the range of travel, I might add). Right?

  4. #4
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by adambikes
    So, basically, the Lefty acts like a seatbelt (when locked). If you move slowly, it will compress. But, if you hit quickly, it will lock (anywhere in the range of travel, I might add). Right?
    No, no sudden lock. It's simply a spring loaded gate through which, with a certain amount of sustained pressure, oil will pass.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  5. #5
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    I have the same behavior as @adambikes describes with my Lefty PBR 29er. Push the lockout and the fork will lock with an audible click when you depress the fork quickly. If you depress slowly, you can even get full travel. It does not feel like a floodgate to me. It really locks the fork. When locked, you can ease up on the fork just slightly and depress the fork even further when done slowly. I have experience with the threshold setting on Fox forks with lockout (RLC) which should be similar to the floodgate, right? The behavior of the PBR is not the same. I can also not find any way of setting the floodgate 'strength' on the fork. Is there any?

  6. #6
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by zonoskar
    I have the same behavior as @adambikes describes with my Lefty PBR 29er. Push the lockout and the fork will lock with an audible click when you depress the fork quickly. If you depress slowly, you can even get full travel. It does not feel like a floodgate to me. It really locks the fork. When locked, you can ease up on the fork just slightly and depress the fork even further when done slowly. I have experience with the threshold setting on Fox forks with lockout (RLC) which should be similar to the floodgate, right? The behavior of the PBR is not the same. I can also not find any way of setting the floodgate 'strength' on the fork. Is there any?
    It is a different feel, correct. It does achieve the same end though, a quiet front end for climbing etc, but full travel when needed.

    It is very tunable, to at least three levels, on either side of where you are now. It's done internally, via a stack of washers. A good Dealer should be able to get you set up, a lesser one can send it to Cannondale for you, and there's always someone else with the knowledge out there somewhere too.

    Yes it's not external, but it is a huge step forward in terms of performance for the Lefty. And to be honest, once it's set where you like it, how often does one fiddle with the lockout threshold? So yes, it may take some fiddling, but once it's right, you're good to go.

    Also worth noting that while in there, the tech can adjust your low speed compression damping too, (4 levels) to help with dive during braking, hard cornering etc.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



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  7. #7
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    So, where do I want lockout threshold and compression damping set? I weigh 165 and race events that take over 6 hours in Pisgah National Forest (very rocky, rooty east coast terrain). I do not jump my bike, but rather try to haul ass and keep my wheels down as much as possible. When i go over big stuff, I push the front end down to keep the wheel in contact with the ground (the 3"-5" hits are coming pretty fast). I like to climb locked out only when climbing fire roads covered in gravel. Kinda do not like that thunky feeling. But, if that is the way lockout should feel, so be it for faster climbing.

  8. #8
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by adambikes
    So, where do I want lockout threshold and compression damping set?

    Hmm, kinda like asking how much maple syrup do I want on my pancakes.

    Know that it is adjustable. From there, you'll have to work in stages. If you want less "squish in" if you will, have the lockout shims adjusted towards the firm end. Kind of a judgement call. Since it goes in steps, you may want to try a step or two towards the firmer lock, or, just go straight to full lockout. I can't answer what you will like or find works best.

    It's set up at the factory with enough blow through to be a nice platform for climbing, but still respond really well to bumps as needed when locked out.

    As for low speed compression, if you find it dives too much for your taste during downhill braking, you'll want to boost it a notch. Still too much, go another.

    You have the ability to get it exactly as you like for your style and terrain. If you worked with a good shop, they'll be able to tear into this, make the adjustment and get it back together in about 1/2 an hour. If it's a sell it and forget it shop, sadly, you'll either need to DIY with the proper tools and understanding, send it to Cannondale, or find another source of knowledgeable support. One to two trips in should net you the result you want.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the nice and clear explanation, Mendon, I was wondering the same thing as the original OP.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    Also worth noting that while in there, the tech can adjust your low speed compression damping too, (4 levels) to help with dive during braking, hard cornering etc.
    Mendon,
    Thanks for the info, I was not aware that the low speed CD could be adjusted.
    I have adjusted the lockout threshold, so if I am in the cartridge at that point, what is the procedure for adjusting the low speed compression? Do I need any additional parts?

    Adam, If you have trouble finding a shop that works on Leftys, try giving Boone Bike a call. I know they are a Cdale dealer and am pretty sure the shop guys there are knowledgable about them.

  11. #11
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogiprophet
    I have adjusted the lockout threshold, so if I am in the cartridge at that point, what is the procedure for adjusting the low speed compression? Do I need any additional parts?
    Yep, you need the tuning kit, it contains the springs, and 4 different ports.

    It's located at the bottom end of the damper stack. Yo can leave the compression rebound circuit on the shaft, it separates below them.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



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  12. #12
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    my fork does the same thing. My friends lefty on his Rize locks out and doesn't move a bit, doesn't clunk. this fork has the weakest lockout ever. It's never actually locked out for me.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnyd3487
    my fork does the same thing.
    What year fork?

    Starting in 2010, 140's have a blow off. in 2011, all Leftys have it. It can be tuned to be solid, but doesn't start that way.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  14. #14
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    No lockout for slow compression

    Yes - my fork acts the same way. It deff. seems to be made that way as a friend and myself both bought lefty pbr 29ers for riding the GDMBR this summer and they both act the same. Under slow compression there is essentially no lock out, but when you hit a bump it locks. It also has a bit of travel before locking making that clunk everyone has mentioned. When I climb out of the saddle it does not compress fast enough to lock, and bobs all over making the lockout useless.....the opposite behavior of what I would want.

    I love the forks ride though....so it is annoying, but I'm not too ticked off. I deff. want to do this kit that changes lockout threshold? Any more info on this, how to do it, what it cost you etc. would be appreciated.

  15. #15
    mnt bike laws of physics
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    You will get it right

    Mine isn't like that at all. Cdale did set up different leftys differently.

    It is a little too complicated to explain how to do it without pictures and you need all the proper tools, but it can be done. Best to send it to Mendon and he can do it for you. Look at the Lockout Threshold thread and you can get an idea of how you want yours set up.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    What year fork?

    Starting in 2010, 140's have a blow off. in 2011, all Leftys have it. It can be tuned to be solid, but doesn't start that way.
    mine is a 2011

  17. #17
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnyd3487
    mine is a 2011
    So it comes with a certain amount of blow off installed. You can make it solid by having the damper pulled and the shimstack re worked, but it's not broken, it's supposed to do that.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  18. #18
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    do they make heavier springs for them too? I'm like 235, and I've never really measured the sag but I feel like I'm using up about half the travel just by standing up

    edit: I've got like 195 psi in it

  19. #19
    mnt bike laws of physics
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    I would get someone to measure your sag so you know for sure.
    Also, the Lefty is set up for the average person which you are not. After getting you sag correct, you will need to get it tuned for your weight and riding style, ability etc.
    I know your dealer doesn't tell you this, but it is just the nature of suspension. Many are easily tuned and many are not. The Lefty is not, but once you get it right, you will be happy you have it. Cannondale dealers really should be on it enough to get this right their customers. IMO, they shouldn't even sell bikes equiped with Leftys if they can't or won't take the time to learn about them and how to tune them for each individual. I blame this on Cannondale though as they really should make more of an effort to train shop employees.
    As an consumer of Leftys, I have taken the time to figure most of it out myself - some of it I learned just by being on this forum.

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