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  1. #1
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    Jekyll Carbon vs Alloy

    I have pretty much decided that I am going to replace my Rize with a Jekyll, I need something a bit stronger. I plan on swapping my parts over from my rize. So how much of a difference is there between the carbon and the alloy? Weight wise, stiffness? Also does anyone know the price difference for just the frame if I had a local shop order if from cannondale? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    I just bought a 2012 Jekyll 3 (Aluminum) myself.
    I looked into both the Carbon & Aluminum models and MY major deciding factor was $$.

    The Jekyll Carbon frame is rumored to be only less than a pound or so lighter.
    Specific specs can be found all around the web and on forums such as this, Pinkbike etc.

    Like my Jekyll so far, but if you do purchase take your time setting up your suspension...
    -FRONT & REAR to work together, changes the whole machine!

    -Mike

  3. #3
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    Sweet thanks, Do you happen to know the weight of your build?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    Sweet thanks, Do you happen to know the weight of your build?
    If I remember corectly I think my aluminum weighs in at about 31lbs...

  5. #5
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    ---- I'll get more dtailed in case it helps----


    Just got an aluminum 2012 Jekyll 3 and I like it a lot so far.
    -Left over 2012 for about $2,400. all said & done.
    -Size Med, approx 31 lbs, compnentry is good (8 out of 10) except for wheel package ( wheels get a 6 out of 10)
    -Needs dropper post

    I know that the carbon frame is rumored to be much stiffer and yes a bit lighter '150-200g' lighter than the aluminum ( Just google Cannondale Jekyll carbon vs aluminum and you'll see some reviews to support)

    I didn't go carbon because I just didn't need the advantage. I'm not racing, I ride for enjoyment and so paying another $G or so for a carbon frame wouldn't really make a difference for me personally. For my personal budget, I'll be putting that money into setting up my 2013 riding season (& a few upgrades for the aluminum Jekyll of-course.. Mainly WHEELS!)
    So depending on how you see it I think it's a good buy.

    ---My experience so far.
    So far I like the bike, but if you do buy a Jekyll I can't state enough that you have to spend time adjusting your suspension when you get your bike.
    The Two geometry and travel modes do work to make a very unique riding package.
    HOWEVER-
    The DYAD RT2 and the Fox TALAS fork have very different tendencies when you follow the set up charts on them.
    -The TALAS chart will leave the fork "Plush" to your weight < "Plush" ,to me, seems to mean squishy and useless at any fun speeds... (for me)
    -The DYAD RT2 chart will leave the rear feeling stiff when not rolling < This is as it should be IMHO... Once at speed the shock works perfectly and sag can be adjusted somewhat independantly of overall compression.
    This stock set up leaves the front end with a diving / vauge feeling that, for me, wasted an otherwise predictable geometry at higher speeds over rough, technical terrain.
    Any high speed hits or small drops and the chasis will dip at it's softest point --The squishy stock fork set up-- Everyone on the forums and reviews seems to be saying to go softer on the rear, which I tried, but for me it was stiffer in the front that made best use of the chasis.
    Once I adjusted accordingly the bike became a whole new machine.
    A ton of fun in a variety of situations. Climbs well, capable of long XC rides but with a more ride-it and rip-it feel to it. Takes to the air with stability and corners with a very predictable tracking to it.

    IMPORTANT IF YOU DO PURCHASE A JEKYLL:
    Follow the Set up proceedures for the DYAD every time you adjust the shock until you get it to track well but not blow through travel in the FRONT or the REAR.
    --Read the set up manual--
    -Relase ALL negeative air pressure
    -Screw the high pressure pump in --ALL THE WAY IN TIGHTLY!!
    -Adjust positive air pressure
    -Adjust negeative air pressure
    -Set rebound
    -Ride

    -Hope this helped some,
    Mike

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the time you took writing that up. I will hopefully be able to order a frame soon ( hopefully cannonale has a frame only option) I would like to get the bike built up and ready before my first enduro race of the season at the end of may. If not I will keep beating on my rize till it breaks or I can get a new frame.
    Has there been any issues with bearings or anything?

  7. #7
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    -Not enough time on mine to show any bearing issues.
    Last edited by s570e; 06-11-2013 at 06:34 AM.

  8. #8
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    I know you said you want just a frame but Cannondale still has 2011 Jekyll 5s. My buddy just picked one up for 1700 plus tax. That's a complete bike! Take off all the parts and sell them or build a second bike and you may come out ahead.

    I have a Jekyll 5. Been riding and racing it a for just over a year. So far I have cracked the rear chain stay.(replaced under warranty). Replaced all the pivot bearings and shafts. I had one of the pinch bolts come loose on one of the suspension pivots and it wore out one of the little aluminum shims inside. That was replaced under warranty also. I also replaced the headset bearings.

    Now all that being said. I ride this bike hard. I am a little anal about fixing this kind of stuff. As far as the bearings go you could not feel any problems with them when they were in the bike. It wasn't until I striped the bike down and cleaned and inspected every part, that I decided to replace all those bearings. They probably would have been just fine to put back together. Since it was apart, I replaced them.

    I love this bike! It really is a Jekyll and hide kind of bike. Climbs well, and rips on the downhills. I couldn't be happier.

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