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  1. #1
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    Jekyll attitude adjustment

    I have a 2000 Jekyll 3000SX with the attitude adjustment rear shock set up. By loosening a large jam nut I can move a threaded adjuster on the rear shock body that will change the angle of the whole bike.

    Since I don't know what that adjustment will do to handling, I chose to set the shock about midway on the adjustment and ride the bike.

    Question: if moving it one way raises the rear and increases the head angle and moving it the other lowers the rear and decreases the head angle (or did I get that backwards) the question I have is which way do I want to go on head angle to get more stability when riding?

    Right now it is fine on flat technical stuff and going up-hill there is a small tendency for the front tire to come off the ground hard peddling, but it is going downhill where its 'whoa stop-stop-stop' because it 'feels' rather twitchy.
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  2. #2
    No good in rock gardens..
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    Depends what you want the bike to be biased towards - XC bikes have steeper head angles (70 - 72 degrees) while downhill bikes have slacker (65 degrees or similar).

    Steeper will feel better at low twisty singlestrack speeds and climbing, and slacker will feel better when you are going down.

    Regarding the front wheel lifting on climbs, there are a few reasons this can happen - your bar height might be too high so the front wheel is unweighted (lower stem or bar) or your technique needs work.

    For really steep climbs you want to move forward on the nose of the saddle and weight the handlebar. You sometimes end up with the nose of the saddle up your backside as you try to balance rear wheel traction vs front wheel on the ground and steering. And you also need to pick the right gear of course.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideknob View Post
    Depends what you want the bike to be biased towards - XC bikes have steeper head angles (70 - 72 degrees) while downhill bikes have slacker (65 degrees or similar).

    Steeper will feel better at low twisty singlestrack speeds and climbing, and slacker will feel better when you are going down.

    Regarding the front wheel lifting on climbs, there are a few reasons this can happen - your bar height might be too high so the front wheel is unweighted (lower stem or bar) or your technique needs work.

    For really steep climbs you want to move forward on the nose of the saddle and weight the handlebar. You sometimes end up with the nose of the saddle up your backside as you try to balance rear wheel traction vs front wheel on the ground and steering. And you also need to pick the right gear of course.
    Thank you ... will give this a try.

    I would like some more stability going downhill even though I ride mainly xc ...
    I will try adjusting as you advised (bike and riding technique)

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