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  1. #1
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    Jekyll 800 as XC & FR?

    I am deciding between Jekyll 800 and Specialized Enduro CMP SFR and cannot come up with the decision ) Both have some plusses and minuses.

    What would you recommend and why?

    Want to do XC most of the time, however, sometimes combined with freeride. My biggest concern is related to single pivot vs. FSR technology and climbing capability. Today I ride Univega Alpina 700 hardtale, trails up to 30-40 miles of distance so also want to make sure the full suspension bike will not make me tired while doing so.

    How is climbing on Jekyll 800? Does it matter that there is no lock-out on Lefty?


    Thank you - Milan

  2. #2
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    First of all, I'll assume you are talking about the 2004 models.

    Both bikes are a well proven design. The Jekyll is going to be slightly lighter (around 1 -1.5lbs). The '04 Jekyll finally has the "Pro-Pedal" rear shock so this will help out a lot on the anti-bob factor. For that matter, so does the Enduro Comp (also has the travel switch 100/130).

    IMO: The C-Dale has a much better front fork. The Enduro Comp is a better "big hit" choice while the C-Dale is closer to the XC type of riding. The Enduro Comp has much better stand over hight if that matters to you... If I remember correctly, the Enduro Comp is about 30 pounds so be warned!

    FWIW: Personally, I think a better comparison would be the Jekyll 800 Vs. Stumpjumper FSR Elite Disc.

  3. #3
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    Thank you for your feedback. I also think that C-Dale's front fork is better that Manitou Black Elite, just does not have lock-out? Do you think it is a problem? 130mm travel - not sure in terms of climbing ...

    Please, can you be more specific regarding "stand over hight" issue? I am not sure what that is.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milan
    Please, can you be more specific regarding "stand over hight" issue? I am not sure what that is.
    “standover height issue”

    It’s all about the “crotch clearance” and the ever present danger of the top tube intruding into parts of your body that were not designed for that kind of abuse. As you straddle the bike with the saddle behind you, you should not be able to gauge the temperature of the frame material or in other words, there should be some space between the frame and “you” in case you have to suddenly or even casually dismount, which you will.

    I believe the standover height is measured about halfway between the seat tube and the head tube. Due to frame designs having many different shaped top tubes, you really should test ride any frame you intend to purchase and this is one of the things you need to assess.

    And from what I’ve heard “top tube intrusion” is an equal opportunity offender and does not discriminate based on gender.

    top tube: the somewhat horizontal tube that extends from the seat tube to the head tube, the head tube being the part of the frame that your front fork is attached to and if you need to know what the seat tube is, I’d like to suggest piano lessons (j/k).

    All in good fun, I hope you got what you’re looking for.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milan
    130mm travel - not sure in terms of climbing ...
    I would be more concerned about the weight than the longer travel for climbing. I don't like either of these 2 bikes for climbing -or- XC....but would rather have the Jekyll if I only had these to choose from.

  6. #6
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    Go with the Jekyll.

    I rode a Jekyll with the Lefty DLR (lockout) for 2 years. great bike, made better with the pro-pedal shock. I currently have a Gemini 1000 with a Lefty MAX TPC+. This is the fork you are asking about, right? It is way better in terms of the damping performance, and the smoothness of the fork. 130mm is a lot of travel for xc, but this is a great trailbike match. go for it.
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  7. #7
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    Jekyll 800

    Hi,

    I am a Jekyll 800 2004 owner (SOBE team replica color). Unfortunately in this part of the world (Slovenia, central Europe) it is still very early spring so I did not have many chances to ride it and test it properly. But I did some climbing and downhill. The bike climbs very very good. I only use rear lock-out for asphalt road climbing. Also the lefty will not give you hard time on climbing. The downhill rocks, the bike is stable in corners and if you are that kind of rider you will enjoy jumps. But first you must replace tires. I now have Continental vertical-pro tection and this tire is very good for both XC and FR biking. It is light and has little friction.
    So I think you can not miss if you buy C-Dale Jekyll 800 or if you have extra money Jekyll 1000, it climbs even better.

    I hope this helps.

    Best regards

    Andrew


    [QUOTE=Milan]I am deciding between Jekyll 800 and Specialized Enduro CMP SFR and cannot come up with the decision ) Both have some plusses and minuses.

    What would you recommend and why?

  8. #8
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    Why didn't you ask this in the Specialized forum, too?

    Quote Originally Posted by Milan
    I am deciding between Jekyll 800 and Specialized Enduro CMP SFR and cannot come up with the decision ) Both have some plusses and minuses.

    What would you recommend and why?

    Want to do XC most of the time, however, sometimes combined with freeride. My biggest concern is related to single pivot vs. FSR technology and climbing capability. Today I ride Univega Alpina 700 hardtale, trails up to 30-40 miles of distance so also want to make sure the full suspension bike will not make me tired while doing so.

    How is climbing on Jekyll 800? Does it matter that there is no lock-out on Lefty?


    Thank you - Milan
    I've had both bikes. I'm currently riding an Enduro w/ a Marzocchi Z1 FR SL fork. The '03 C-dale is for sale on Ebay. I broke 3 of the frames, and 4(!) of the swingarms. Kudos to Cannondale and my LBS for warranteeing it every time.

    I like the handling much better on the Enduro. It seems to be a part of me more than the Cannondale was. The Jekyll I felt like I was on top of it- not really 'one' with the bike.

    What fork comes with the Enduro? My stock fork was the Marz MX Comp, while a good, inexpensive fork, will not be as nice (or maintenance-free) as the Lefty. That was the best thing about my C-dale- that Lefty. Not much damping, tho, for some reason.

    I'd go w/ the Enduro, and upgrade to a better fork sometime down the road. I think it will last longer, and it will ride better, imo, especially for the freeride stuff. The C-dale seemed to be more of a cross country bike. Both bikes climb equally well, and I never use(d) the lockout on either bike for climbs.

    My Enduro weighs 32-33 lbs, due to the 2.5 and 2.3 tires I'm running. I don't feel the weight at all.

    fp
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  9. #9
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    A Genini 900 or 1000 will be a better bet for you...With the stable platform shocks and the ability to switch between 7" & 6" of Travel it pedals great and it not incredably heavy. It can easilly take the abuse of drops, bridges and DH. I rode it for XC pretty much all last year with some FR. This year I'm making it more for DH but what a fun all around bike...it just feels good to ride. With the right components you can make the bike about 30lbs. I think they are about 35 stock.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milan
    How is climbing on Jekyll 800? Does it matter that there is no lock-out on Lefty?


    Thank you - Milan
    The rebound adjustement on the new Lefty Max with TCP+ damping is pretty amazing, and functions much like a lockout. Just turn the dial which is conveniently located between bar and stem, and that fork stiffens up considerably.
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcw
    The rebound adjustement on the new Lefty Max with TCP+ damping is pretty amazing, and functions much like a lockout. Just turn the dial which is conveniently located between bar and stem, and that fork stiffens up considerably.
    I just bought a 2004 Jekyl 800 and it does not come with the Lefty Max TCP+. I heard you can easily upgrade to the TCP+, Ti for an unkown cost. I think it would be a good investment and when I find the cost I will most likly do this. My Lefty might need some shims to adjust the compretion but I feel that it bounces a little too much

  12. #12
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    Jekyll 600 in Downhill??

    I have a 2004 Jekyll 600 and did not get a chance this season to try some downhill. Has anyone done any downhill riding with this bike?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sctrix1
    I have a 2004 Jekyll 600 and did not get a chance this season to try some downhill. Has anyone done any downhill riding with this bike?
    I have tried downhilling on a Jekyll- not the 600. I had the head angle as slack as possible, so the handling was very stable until the trail became VERY ruff. I didn't worry too much because I had full body armor on. It really depends on where you are going to go downhilling. In generall, I feel more confindent on a beefier bike with at least 7-8 inches of travel for the techinical courses we have out here in Nevada. For Black Diamond courses, stick with the bigger hit bikes (like the Gemini....). For smoother downhill courses, the Jekyll is a blast.

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