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  1. #1
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    How safe is the Lefty fork it still boggles me

    Everytime I look at the lefty fork it still boggles my imagination. One Arm errrrrr

    It also makes me think how safe it is. I ride a klein that uses manitou forks and i get even distribution of my force going to the ground through 2 legs. With the lefty do you have to adjust your riding to compensate. If you push down too hard on the right handlebar wouldnt you come off??

    Am dubious about buying a cannondale with one.

    Please help.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by KleinAttitude
    Everytime I look at the lefty fork it still boggles my imagination. One Arm errrrrr

    It also makes me think how safe it is. I ride a klein that uses manitou forks and i get even distribution of my force going to the ground through 2 legs. With the lefty do you have to adjust your riding to compensate. If you push down too hard on the right handlebar wouldnt you come off??

    Am dubious about buying a cannondale with one.

    Please help.

    Thanks
    You're kidding right?

    It makes no difference how the forces are transmitted. Your weight is balanced over the wheels. I also know this from riding one for a year. And if it can land an F-16 on a carrier then it can land me and my bike off a 3 foot drop no problemo!


  3. #3
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    e-mono

    Stop thinking too much and ride

    While the mono fork is new to the MTB scene, the concept has been used in motorcycles for a while.

    Having said that, ridding with no hands can cause it to pull s l i g h t l y (due to the head angle). Since that counts for .03% of ones ridding, it ain't no big dillio.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaveOn
    Stop thinking too much and ride

    While the mono fork is new to the MTB scene, the concept has been used in motorcycles for a while.

    Having said that, ridding with no hands can cause it to pull s l i g h t l y (due to the head angle). Since that counts for .03% of ones ridding, it ain't no big dillio.
    Nope.. only real difference is the weight of the Lefty on the left side... head angle is the same as on my Fatty. The net forces from wheel to rider are the same. There are opposing (and balanced) tortional forces on the front axel and and "double clamps" but it nets out. Just like the ones on the left and right sides of a conventional fork. It just looks odd and the brain has a hard time thinking it through when it is not symetrical on all axis.

    It feels no different... except maybe more rigid and potentially lighter than what you have felt in the past.

  5. #5
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    Like RaveOn says though. I dont fancy doing no handed on it. I tend to lay back on the saddle of my attitude in 24th gear and cruise nohanded on the roads sometimes.

    With the lefty I,d be pooping my pants.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoloWithOthers
    Nope.. only real difference is the weight of the Lefty on the left side... head angle is the same as on my Fatty.
    I know the head angle is same...I brought that up because the geometry of anything angled with a bias to one side (ie. lefty) can have small opposing forces (ie. very slight pull when no handed). Increase the angle and the forces are greater. This is one reason you will never see a "Lefty" on a DH bike.

    KleinAttitude...doing no-handed ridding is not as bad as you think (or I made it out to be). Its easily compensated and at times not even noticeable.

    In any case, I think the "Lefty" in an amazing piece of engineering that has proved to be very functional and reliable. If I were buying a new Dale, I would make sure it had a Lefty.

  7. #7
    jcw
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    My advice...

    demo one. You'll be blown away at the improved control you have in the technical stuff. It has the stiffness advantage of an inverted, triple clamp fork without the wheel deflection issues caused by stantion rotation. This is due to the leftys square internals running on needle bearings. Try it, you'll like it.
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

  8. #8
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    You mentioned it's not good for DH?

    Would it be stable to do light freeriding up to 5-6 feet?

  9. #9
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    New question here.

    Is this fork good for light freeriding. Drops 5-6 feet?

  10. #10
    jcw
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    No problem...

    Cedric Gracia has been riding one for years in competition. If it can put up with his riding, I'm guessing that it can handle yours.
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoloWithOthers
    if it can land an F-16 on a carrier then it can land me and my bike off a 3 foot drop no problemo!
    Hate to burst your bubble, but F-16s don't land on carriers, they are not equipped with the proper landing gear and retrieval equippment.

    Anyways....

    Klien I am with you, every time I see one on the trail I wonder how strong they really are, it just looks so "unsafe", but I am sure they are fine, I have never heard of one snapping in two.

  12. #12
    MRC
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    Defintely, was just about to say the same thing. A mate of mine (who outrides all of my riding buddies) with his Lefty was watching a NWD video the other day and he's like "I think I've still got a bit of scope in my Lefty" after watching Gracia.

  13. #13
    foo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidz
    Is this fork good for light freeriding. Drops 5-6 feet?
    Lefty Ti, 5+ foot drop to flat rock with Mavic 317 rims and XC tires. Not too much of a problem. The only thing I've found that the Lefty doesn't like is to be submersed in water (ie. creek crossings).



    (photo courtesy of Lidarman)

  14. #14
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    OK.. that's the "before" picture anyway <eom>

    Anything will fly if you throw it hard enough.

  15. #15
    foo
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoloWithOthers
    Anything will fly if you throw it hard enough.
    It's probably not an ideal fork for heavier riders, but for me (160lbs) it's the ultimate lightweight fork. I'd put a Lefty on all my bikes if their geometry/headtube allowed for it! Awesome fork for technical riding... and I ride my bikes pretty hard.








  16. #16
    jcw
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    And anyone who's into the freeride thing should be...

    looking at the Lefty Max anyway. BTW, awsome pic's Foo!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by foo


    Finally, a picture that is ASAIL (As Steep As It Looks)

  18. #18
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    Hey I only want mine to be able to cope with 80% road and 20% offroad.

    Not cliff jumping lol.

  19. #19
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    Go shave something :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by KleinAttitude
    Hey I only want mine to be able to cope with 80% road and 20% offroad.

    Not cliff jumping lol.
    I'm just in a bad mood since it is raining here in Dallas and I can't ride my Klein Attitude so I am taking our by riding you. :-)

    Last edited by SoloWithOthers; 01-16-2004 at 06:54 AM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by KleinAttitude
    Everytime I look at the lefty fork it still boggles my imagination. One Arm errrrrr

    It also makes me think how safe it is. I ride a klein that uses manitou forks and i get even distribution of my force going to the ground through 2 legs. With the lefty do you have to adjust your riding to compensate. If you push down too hard on the right handlebar wouldnt you come off??

    Am dubious about buying a cannondale with one.

    Please help.

    Thanks
    I echo what has been said before. The lefty is no fun to ride without your hands on the bars, starts to get a little wild. I have been riding my Scalpel for about a year now and have had no problems with it not being rigid or pushing to the right. The only difference you will find is if you look down at your fork while you are riding it. Just ride and you will not notice it only has one side.

  21. #21
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by smbabbitt
    The only difference you will find is if you look down at your fork while you are riding it.

    Yeah lol as you may ruin your underpants. Its a bit drop over those handlebars.

  22. #22
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    Another advantage of the Lefty is that there's no chance of the front wheel ejecting from the dropouts due to disc brakes and QR (currently there seems to be a stink going around in that regard).

  23. #23
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    First impressions

    When the lefty first rolled off the truck, thought it was crap. That was until we took it at a hard angle into a big curb in the parking lot and it sucked it up and rolled through it no problem. Next went to a local trail and road. At a part of the trail where it was always a little sketchy, the lefty tracked perfectly right through it. We didnt' believe it and road back up and came down again thinking we took a different line. nope, the lefty was just that much better.

    i have been riding a jekyll with lefty dlr for a few years now with no problems, only a big smile on my face. (and i am a larger rider who rides very agressive) There have been times that it has saved my butt from being lauched over the bar! In my experience the people that don't like the lefty are the people that have never really ridden it, and are basing their opinion of it on first impressions and everyday logic. everyone i have come accross has said it's the best fork they have used and i agree. (and this includes some anal engineers who hated it at first before they really looked at it and rode it)

    I was not a cannondale guy before my jekyll, but i am now for life

  24. #24
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    The lefty is an excellent shock. I rode one for 2 years with no issues. I weigh 230 pounds and often take 3-4 foot drops. The only problem I had was after a water crossing the bearings got screwed up. Sent it back to Cannondale to fix and they sent the shock back with the axel installed 180 degrees backwards so the wheel would have been on the wrong side. I had no tools so I had to send it back.

  25. #25
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    I agree with everyone about the performance of the Lefty. But I have to stress that the fork doesn't like water crossings. The fork boot has small breather holes that let the water in when crossing a creek that is over your front hub. I rode my Lefty for almost 3 years before it had to be completely rebuilt (cost=$200). Thank God they put it back together the right way the first time. The lateral stiffness and rigidity of the Lefty were very apparent after I rode my RS Judy for 3 weeks while I waited for the rebuild. Ride one. you'll like it alot. Also, if you're looking down at your Lefty while riding because it's tripping you out that you have a one-sided fork then get ready to meet the ground or some other object on the trail. You better be looking 20 feet down the trail with this fork!

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